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Old 08-17-2010, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,082 posts, read 2,489,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
I think Henry's point was that the trails in the East are often older and cut through dense forests, meaning that most hikes in the Appalachians are a constant battle with tree roots, large rocks, often poorly maintained or poorly constructed trail surfaces, and very uneven slopes. Many of the original trails in the Appalachians were cut out to go directly to the summit of the mountain, whereas trailblazers in the West were more careful to use switchbacks, particularly considering the ruggedness and harsh conditions of the higher elevations.
Yep, that was precisely my point. Trail conditions are not necessarily dictated by the ruggedness of the mountain. I'm glad to see at least some people understand the distinction. Very nice pictures, by the way. I've enjoyed some of the same real estate.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:57 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,628 posts, read 13,885,151 times
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Old post, but a good time to kick off again. I always said, when looking up at the towering peaks/ ranges of the Canadian Rockies was that's what you do, look up. The difference with the Blue Ridges you lived IN them and on them.
An other observation was a few years ago I spent a full week or more in Colorado above 9,000 ft. Moving across this high world with a different destination every night. By the end , I sure was glad to get back to earth. Just too long, too high for anything but Mountain goats and big horn sheep. We all were in vintage cars, there were a lot of engine fires because of the elevation.Our cars had less power also.
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Old 02-22-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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The link seems to be dead now.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:07 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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This is a good map of classifying the US by terrain:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/natio...0/ca000048.jpg

The big mountains in the US are labelled with "D6". Smaller ones D5. More isolated mountainous areas get a C instead of a D.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
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Thats a great map ! There are some errors, however understanding how the numbering system works , it does not identify Ranges , only mean elevations I guess for a given area of the country. More like a Topo map on a giant scale.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:40 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Thats a great map ! There are some errors, however understanding how the numbering system works , it does not identify Ranges , only mean elevations I guess for a given area of the country. More like a Topo map on a giant scale.
It's actually not mean elevation, but local relief the mean difference between mountaintops and valleys for a given area. So the Colorado Rockies don't get any benefit of extra elevation over the North Cascades.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:57 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
It's actually not mean elevation, but local relief the mean difference between mountaintops and valleys for a given area. So the Colorado Rockies don't get any benefit of extra elevation over the North Cascades.
I see the difference now, by using a number/grade system. This goes right along with my statement " in the west people live in the valleys, in the east we live in the mountains" There are a few exceptions, like Mt Mitchel and Mt Washington but those are not addressed in the relief. You can ask any truck driver which roads he would rather travel on, western mountain areas or eastern highways in, say West Virgina.. its always the western mts. hands down !
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,129 posts, read 9,899,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This is a good map of classifying the US by terrain:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/natio...0/ca000048.jpg

The big mountains in the US are labelled with "D6". Smaller ones D5. More isolated mountainous areas get a C instead of a D.
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Thats a great map ! There are some errors, however understanding how the numbering system works , it does not identify Ranges , only mean elevations I guess for a given area of the country. More like a Topo map on a giant scale.
This really is a good map!

You can see the huge Central Valley of California where much of our food comes from. In the East, you can see the Great Valley which runs from the Deep South way into the Northeast.
Great Appalachian Valley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You also can see the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys in the Northeast which provides a mostly clear path through the mountains.
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