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Old 08-11-2010, 06:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Don't forget the Porcupine Mountains in the U.P. of Michigan!

They're very worn down and can barely be considered mountains, but they are some of the oldest mountains in the world, which makes them cool.




For some really good pics of the area, check out this page from the picture thread on the Michigan forum:

In that case, don't forget the Uwharrie Mountains of Central North Carolina.

From Morrow Mountain State Park just east of Albemarle, NC


The majestic peaks of the Uwharrie Mountains rise above beautiful Lake Tillery.
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Old 08-11-2010, 10:44 PM
 
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the last poster obviously has no idea what they're talking about in colorado alone there are 53 14ers and about 730 13er's. Anyone who's done any hiking/mountain climbing would know not to compare the East with the West. Yes there's some pretty hikes but nothing like what you find in the west.
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Old 08-11-2010, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Rural Northern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I could be way off on this... but I think the Rockies generally rise up from a plateau that is 5,000-6,000 feet above sea level, while the Appalachians rise from land that is 500-1,000 feet above sea level.

So... a peak of 6,000 feet in the Appalachians is actually similar to a peak of 11,000 feet in the Rockies if you are only looking at how high the peak rises from the surrounding valleys.

I'm sure I butchered the explanation, but my point is that comparing elevations isn't totally fair when you're comparing the mountain ranges.
This is true in some cases, and not true in others. It's generally true for the Rockies, but really not true with regards to the Sierra Nevada or Cascade ranges, and there are ranges in the Basin and Range province that also rise significantly above their surroundings. Telescope Peak, for example, rises 11,300 feet in about 15 miles one side, and about 10,000 feet in 15-20 miles in the other. In Eastern California, the highest and lowest points in the lower 48 states are just 76 miles apart. It's very mountainous terrain.

Here's a shot of Shasta from Dunsmuir, which is at an elevation of 2,280 feet. Shasta's 14,179 ft, so that's quite a bit of elevation gain in a short distance.


That's not the greatest picture, but I've stood at the base of Shasta, and you have to crane your neck to see the top. It's pretty impressive.
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Old 08-12-2010, 05:37 PM
 
Location: IN
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Anyone who has been to the top of Mt. Washington, NH knows that the climate there is more extreme than just about any mountain in the world. Home to the highest sustained wind gust ever recorded at 231mph.
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Old 08-12-2010, 06:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
In that case, don't forget the Uwharrie Mountains of Central North Carolina.

From Morrow Mountain State Park just east of Albemarle, NC


The majestic peaks of the Uwharrie Mountains rise above beautiful Lake Tillery.
Are those majestic peaks hidden in the fog behind those hills?
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Old 08-14-2010, 12:54 AM
 
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I live to hike, and backpack, and have done some mountain climbing. I must admit that I prefer the rugged mountains of the west. But, there are beautiful areas with topography in other areas, ie the pics from Michigan. I don't consider them mountains, more like hills or foothills, but they have their own beauty. I appreciate the lushness of the Appalachians. But it is hard to match the lushness of the Cascades and especially the Olympics Mountains. But there the lushness comes at the price of being sopping wet...

The terrain in the west definitely requires some work to conquer. I must admit as I get older, it gets harder and harder to get into some of my favorite spots simply due to the steepness and altitude of the terrain. Above 11000, I really notice a huge decrease in my performance. Above 12000 I will get hypoxic after a couple hours. At times I wish the terrain were more rolling and gentle

But I really appreciate most of all just how isolated one can get in the western mountains. I've have literally gone days and not seen a single soul in both the Uintas and the Wind Rivers. No towns in sight, no human in sight...it really makes one feel truly alone and vulnerable. It makes me feel as if I've gone back in time. I love that feeling.

I took this from the top of Wilson Peak, Uintas, 13060 ft.
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Old 08-14-2010, 05:41 AM
 
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Maybe someone can help with a mountain related question. I was flying out west and flew over a long rocky escarpment that stretched as far as the eye could see. I would guesstimate 1,000- 2000 ' high, fairly straight in a north/ south line. Very sparsely populated area, fairly dry. Any ideas where this might be?
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Old 08-14-2010, 11:34 AM
 
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maybe if you posted where you flying to/from and also how long into the flight it would be easier to narrow down. Were you still east of the Rockies?
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Old 08-14-2010, 12:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
As someone has said, most of the mountains out west aren't all that much taller than what can be find in the high elevations of the Appalachians. There isn't much in the way of 14,000 feet tall mountains out west. Mt. Whitney is in the 14,000-15,000 ELEVATION range, and it is the tallest mountain in the "lower 48". Most of these mountains rise from an elevation of anywhere from 3,000-5,000 feet, with the exception of the Cascades, Sierras, Olympic, and other coastal ranges. Of these, only the Sierras have an overall much larger increase in elevation from base to summit. In this regard, I suppose one could say that the Sierra Mountains is the true tallest mountain chain in the lower 48. Of the Rockies, With a few exceptions, they aren't much taller than the Appalachians in true elevation.
Not really though. You could compare unknown mountains in the Coast Ranges of the West Coast with the true elevation of the highest mountains in the East. There are mountains just outside the suburbs of the San Francisco Bay Area or along the Central Coast that are comparable to the Appalachians. There are mountains directly outside Los Angeles that are higher than anything east of the Rockies. I'm not even going to try to mention all the ranges and sub-ranges of the Rocky Mountains stretching from Montana to New Mexico.

As far as hiking, true elevation doesn't mean much if you have a road to the summit like on Mt. Mitchell in North Carolina or Mt. Washington in New Hampshire(and a know Mt. Washington can be a challenge depending when and where you go up). And I love the mountains of the East--but in comparison--hiking up 3,000 feet on a steep wooded trail to a 5,000 foot summit or hiking up 3,000 feet on loose scree and snowpack to a 13,000 foot summit are very different experiences.
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Old 08-14-2010, 12:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Maybe someone can help with a mountain related question. I was flying out west and flew over a long rocky escarpment that stretched as far as the eye could see. I would guesstimate 1,000- 2000 ' high, fairly straight in a north/ south line. Very sparsely populated area, fairly dry. Any ideas where this might be?
Do you have any idea what state(or states) you were flying over? That could be a lot of places in the West...
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