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Old 08-09-2010, 05:42 PM
 
Location: QUEENS
447 posts, read 1,371,194 times
Reputation: 130

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RussianIvanov View Post
Those numbers do not look that bad. Did you only do the math for up to this point? For example 50 murders halfway through the year for a city of 100,000 will make the murder rate 50 per 100,000 only through the halfway mark not the year. By the end of the year that city has 100 murders and per 100,000 it would be 100 per 100,000. Is that how you did it? Because the decrease looks dramatic for some of those cities.
Thats only halfway through the year.
ALMOST double the numbers and you got the final total.
New Orleans murder rate in particular has spike since Katrina. I think the murder rate in N.O. was 67 per 100,000 in 2008.
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:43 PM
 
Location: QUEENS
447 posts, read 1,371,194 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
2010 Murder Rates:

36.1 - New Orleans
35.5 - Flint
30.5 - Gary
27.5 - Camden
27.1 - Baton Rouge
22.9 - Youngstown
21.4 - Wilmington
20.3 - St. Louis
20.0 - Compton
19.5 - Baltimore
---
63.3 - East St. Louis
50.0 - Chester
36.7 - East Chicago
20.0 - Harrisburg

As of now.
Thats as of now?
Imagine what E. ST.Louis will be at the end of the year.
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:13 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,491 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by slengel View Post
what do most of these cities have in common? very small physical city limits. crime rankings are misleading and fail to tell the whole story. they do not account for crime distribution. most of these cities' violent crimes are concentrated in a few select zip codes, not throughout the entire city. they just happen to have some really bad neighborhoods. furthermore, random crime is extremely rare in all cities; most are gang or drug related. to call the entire city "dangerous" is unfair and patently false.

it's also worthwhile to mention that chicago does not report its crimes to the fbi, so it will never appear on a list like this.
That might be a better way to tell crime rates is to go by zip codes. It would be interesting to see what the distribution of crime rates in each city by its zip code (or in the case of larger zip codes some other division) and see what a typical area in any city is.

Also one factor that could skew crime statistics is places that have more foot traffic and people visiting than residents.
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Old 08-09-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,235,465 times
Reputation: 1802
The Bay Area should be ashamed that it has 2 cities in the top 15 most dangerous cities [Oakland and Richmond].
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,133 posts, read 8,333,737 times
Reputation: 1085
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussianIvanov View Post
Those numbers do not look that bad. Did you only do the math for up to this point? For example 50 murders halfway through the year for a city of 100,000 will make the murder rate 50 per 100,000 only through the halfway mark not the year. By the end of the year that city has 100 murders and per 100,000 it would be 100 per 100,000. Is that how you did it? Because the decrease looks dramatic for some of those cities.
Yes, that's how I did the math.

In this list the first number is murders YTD and the second number is the total for 2009:

New Orleans - 122/174
Flint - 39/36
Gary - 29/49
Camden - 22/34
Baton Rouge - 61/95
Youngstown - 16/23
Wilmington - 16/18
St. Louis - 71/143
Compton - 19/38
Baltimore - 129/238
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
And? What makes, for example, Madawaska, Maine less french than Cabano Quebec?
Cabano is way more French than Madawaska.

Kids in Cabano learn the three Rs in school in French. Kids in Madawaska learn the three Rs in English.

Town council in Cabano meets in French. Town council in Madawaska meets in English.

All store signs in Cabano are in French. Almost all store signs in Madawaska are only in English.

When a stranger approaches you in Cabano, he will do so in French. When a stranger approaches you in Madawaska, he will do so in English.

If you go to McDonald's or a gas station in Cabano, the little print out from the cash register will be in French. In Madawaska it will be in English.

Cabano is in the province of Quebec (official language: French) in a country called Canada (official languages: French and English). Madawaska is in the United States of America, where French has no official status, and English is the only de facto official language.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
Um... Canada?

Quebec (city) went a year without a murder (maybe more than once, I'm not sure)- That's amazing for a city of near 500K.
It was actually 18 months without a single murder.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
And? What makes, for example, Madawaska, Maine less french than Cabano Quebec?

Your claim was that "Canada is more French than anything in America". Well, that to me says you don't believe there are any french areas of the country that are as french as french areas of Canada.

As for your statement about towns verse a whole province, what are you trying to prove? Im aware of this irrelevant fact. You said nothing in America is as french as in Canada. Now that deserves a smack

Do they have more french speakers? ...Yes. But that has nothing to do with your claim

I think i would know more about Canada than you, as i have spent portions of my life there
There isn't anywhere in the U.S. that would be "more French" than the "most French" places in Canada would be. The most French places in Canada (which is almost every single place in Quebec, and even quite a few in New Brunswick) operate entirely in French much the same way a town in France would. There isn't anywhere in the U.S. where this is the case.

I've been to all of the so-called "very French" places in the U.S. (northern Maine, Louisiana Cajun Country, etc.) and there isn't anywhere that comes close to the Frenchness of francophone areas in Canada.

Sure, you can compare Madawaska, ME or Breaux Bridge, LA (where French is somewhat present) to a Canadian place where there are no francophones at all like Seaforth, Ontario, or Pincher Creek, Alberta, but you are comparing the absolute maximum in the U.S. to the absolute minimum in Canada.

Though it is a nice surprise for people to find that French still has some life in northern Maine, the Frenchness of Madawaska cannot compare even to the pervasiveness of that language just across the Saint John River in New Brunswick towns all along the border.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
Louisiana, the most french state in the US is also the most dangerous and one of the poorest
Statistically speaking, I think that Maine is probably the most "French" state in the U.S. It has a higher percentage of its population that is francophone than Louisiana does.

New Hampshire is also quite close to Louisiana in terms of percentage of French speakers.
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Old 08-10-2010, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,491 posts, read 6,473,944 times
Reputation: 10927
It would be an interesting doctorial thesis to examine these cities' histories in comparison to those on the opposite end of the list, and see what the differences were.

We need to start examining how we got to this mess, and see what others are doing to fix it.

Stop bemoaning our problems and start fixing them.
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