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Old 06-28-2007, 06:57 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,326,863 times
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no mention of Bmore? the pop in 1950 was close to 1mil, now its 600,000 some. Now the population is stable though
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Old 06-28-2007, 07:21 PM
 
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I can't say for certain why they are shrinking. But Mpls. has lost 150,000 people from its apex. Neighborhoods weren't demoed. More jobs were created in the metro. The simple answer up here was that there were fewer residents per unit. Now thats unfortunate, but not the death of the city. Couple that with suburbanization and I bet that accounts for a bigger decline than some percieved economic apocalypse. Sure, they got hurt, and they are still hurting, but half the metro didn't move to Fla.
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Old 06-29-2007, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,753,447 times
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Yeah, I think when a city loses population it is very overstated. Its amazing how people cheerlead when a city gains population but what demographic is it gaining is the question is that economic demographic going to increasing the quality of life for the city?

None the less, its suprising how these cities just keep having such a population loss after all the decades one would think they would be somewhat stable. I was looking at the Census and it seems like while Pittsburgh recently though has sort of not been losing population as fast, Cleveland is now shrinking at the same percentage as Detroit which is amazing.

Pittsburgh even though they have lost so much population I think will do fine. The one thing about Pittsburgh is because of its very low household sizes one cant expect it to gain people. When a city has so many senior-citizens and college students its just not going to increase in population like a suburb of huge brand-new wood framed homes.

I think the cities that are in real big trouble and have major, major issues are Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo. Cleveland especially now that its population decline seems to have escalated to about the same percentage per year as Detroit's should really try to get its act together but then Ohio isnt known for strong-regionalism to improve its inner-cities.

Its amazing Cleveland that was built to be a city of a million people now has about 440,000 while Omaha, Nebraska is just slightly smaller and if current trends continue will be bigger then Cleveland by the 2010 census.

Last edited by MattDen; 06-29-2007 at 04:34 AM..
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Old 06-29-2007, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Raleigh,NC
351 posts, read 975,411 times
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New stats on Cities losing population.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2007/cb07-91table4.xls (broken link)
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Old 06-29-2007, 10:58 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,055,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
It is not true that all sunbelt cities are annexing their suburbs, either. Denver has not annexed in 30 yrs or so. An amendment to the Colorado constitution made it very difficult for Denver to annex.
I'm not talking about the last 30 years, I'm talking the last 100. I believe the cities in question (St Louis, Buffalo, et al.) have not annexed during that period, whereas Phoenix, Jax, Nashville, Memphis and many others in the Sunbelt have. Probably Denver, too.
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Old 06-29-2007, 11:14 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,055,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
I can't say for certain why they are shrinking. But Mpls. has lost 150,000 people from its apex. Neighborhoods weren't demoed. More jobs were created in the metro. The simple answer up here was that there were fewer residents per unit. Now thats unfortunate, but not the death of the city. Couple that with suburbanization and I bet that accounts for a bigger decline than some percieved economic apocalypse. Sure, they got hurt, and they are still hurting, but half the metro didn't move to Fla.
Well, since its apex (1950), Mpls lost lots of housing through demo due to the construction of interstates 94, 35E and 390, as well as the Hiawatha Corridor which alone was responsible for the loss of hundreds of homes in the 1960s for the freeway that was planned but never built (now occupied by light rail & bikepath). Also urban "renewal", decimated lots of residences in and around downtown. The Gateway distict (bounded roughly by Henn., the River, Portland and 4th St) alone was home to something like 10k people (don't quote me!) before it was razed in the early 60s. Now it's parking lots, some parkland and a few office buidlings.

Good point about effects of suburbanization vs loss of jobs. Metro areas that lost large numbers of jobs when their industries collapsed (e.g., Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Cleveland) are in the population loss or slow growth rate categories; metro areas with growing economies have higher population gains even when their central cities have declined in population since their apexes (e.g., Minneapolis, Boston, Milwaukee, Cincinnati)
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Old 06-29-2007, 12:16 PM
 
2,153 posts, read 5,003,125 times
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I didn't click links or anything so this might be covered already.

Do they take into account the suburbs? I live outside of St. Louis and EVERYONE lives in suburbs here. STL the city might be losing people but the suburbs are definitely gaining people.
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Old 06-29-2007, 07:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,015 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I'm not talking about the last 30 years, I'm talking the last 100. I believe the cities in question (St Louis, Buffalo, et al.) have not annexed during that period, whereas Phoenix, Jax, Nashville, Memphis and many others in the Sunbelt have. Probably Denver, too.
Over 100 yrs ago, Denver annexed a bunch of suburbs on the west side. In 1902 the city and county of Denver was formed with boundaries roughly as at present. Since the Poundstone Amendment to the constitution was passed in 1974, virtually nothing has been annexed.
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Old 06-30-2007, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,283,783 times
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Detroit metro is stable or growing, while Cleveland and Pittsburgh have kept falling. However, the falling in Cleveland and Pittsburgh has prompted this cities to spice up their downtowns, in order to retain a regional focal point.
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Old 06-30-2007, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Raleigh,NC
351 posts, read 975,411 times
Reputation: 178
This might be part of the problem:

The Sky Is Not Falling On Cities | Planetizen
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