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Old 07-01-2007, 11:00 AM
 
143 posts, read 789,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I agree to a point with ajf131; however, the Cleveland metro area has decreased in size as well. It is not true that all sunbelt cities are annexing their suburbs, either. Denver has not annexed in 30 yrs or so. An amendment to the Colorado constitution made it very difficult for Denver to annex.
Denver...Sunbelt?
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Old 07-01-2007, 11:18 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vader View Post
Denver...Sunbelt?
Yes. If you look at city-data's own stats, you will see partly cloudy to clear days range from 60% - 80% depending on the month. NWS says, I believe, 250 sunny days/yr; Chamber of Commerce says 300. I say, if you count all the days where the sun shines even a little, it's 360/yr (this was a topic on the Pittsburgh forum recently).
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Old 07-01-2007, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,286,835 times
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The Sunbelt isn't a place per se. It's a mystical magical state of mind, albeit one that you can't channel sitting on the couch in Akron or Scranton.
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:53 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,066,992 times
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When the term was coined in the late 70s/early 80s, it included the traditional Southern and Southwestern states, and the mountain states of NV, UT and CO. Denver was definitiely considered a Sunbelt city from Day 1.

Sunshine has as much to do with it as rust has to do with the old indiuctrial cities--it's just a way to characterize the area.
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Old 07-01-2007, 09:42 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Well, whatever definition you use, it sure is sunny here! That is something a lot of people from other parts of the country don't know. So it's not real smart to use the "sarcasm" smilie. And it does not snow in metro Denver in July or August.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 07-01-2007 at 09:44 PM.. Reason: addition
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Old 07-02-2007, 02:44 PM
 
143 posts, read 789,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Yes. If you look at city-data's own stats, you will see partly cloudy to clear days range from 60% - 80% depending on the month. NWS says, I believe, 250 sunny days/yr; Chamber of Commerce says 300. I say, if you count all the days where the sun shines even a little, it's 360/yr (this was a topic on the Pittsburgh forum recently).
"Sunbelt" (aka Biblebelt) has nothing to do with it being sunny is was made up for traditional southern cities thats growing (aka annexing) its population. Have you ever heard anyone call cities in California the Sunbelt?? No.

"Rustbelt" (aka Snowbelt) was meant to encompass cities with shrinking (aka sprawling) populations and deteriorating manufacturing industries not number of cloudy days.Have you ever heard anyone call New York rustbelt? No. Got it..

Never the less when people think of Denver they think of mountains and cold winters, NOT the sun..Sorry but Denver is not the sunbelt. Its just..well..Denver.
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Old 07-02-2007, 06:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Ben Around:
Quote:
When the term was coined in the late 70s/early 80s, it included the traditional Southern and Southwestern states, and the mountain states of NV, UT and CO. Denver was definitiely considered a Sunbelt city from Day 1.
I agree. People who think of Colorado think of the mountains (correct) and cold winters (wrong, in general). There are some exceptions, but even in the mtns, it's warm enough for people to enjoy the skiing most of the winter, and it is not winter year-round even if some people think that.
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Old 07-02-2007, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Midwest
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Midstate Illinois for me is sunbelt, at least cornbelt. It's the farthest I have lived away from the Great Lakes rustbelt. Get lots of sun, see fewer UAW goons. Word.

Dorothy: Toto, I don't think we're in Akron anymore!
Frank Lloyd Wright: Good, because I hate that place. (from Akron Beacon Journal story of 2005)
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Old 07-02-2007, 10:05 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,917,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M TYPE X View Post
Midstate Illinois for me is sunbelt, at least cornbelt. It's the farthest I have lived away from the Great Lakes rustbelt. Get lots of sun, see fewer UAW goons. Word.

Dorothy: Toto, I don't think we're in Akron anymore!
Frank Lloyd Wright: Good, because I hate that place. (from Akron Beacon Journal story of 2005)
Midstate Illinois? Sunbelt? LOL!!!! I'll buy cornbelt but as for sunbelt that's even further south than Kentucky possibly. Where I live is not considered the Sunbelt, so why is Central Illinois? Btw..just curious...why do you hate Northeast Ohio so much? You could pretty much call me a semi-Clevelander given my entire maternal side lives there and my mother grew up there. I find Cleveland to be VERY similar to St. Louis except with Detroit's weather, and St. Louis does not suck. These two Midwestern cities are close behind Detroit, Chicago, and Minneapolis/Saint Paul among the most defining cities of the Midwest.
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Old 07-02-2007, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,286,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Midstate Illinois? Sunbelt? LOL!!!! I'll buy cornbelt but as for sunbelt that's even further south than Kentucky possibly. Where I live is not considered the Sunbelt, so why is Central Illinois? Btw..just curious...why do you hate Northeast Ohio so much? You could pretty much call me a semi-Clevelander given my entire maternal side lives there and my mother grew up there. I find Cleveland to be VERY similar to St. Louis except with Detroit's weather, and St. Louis does not suck. These two Midwestern cities are close behind Detroit, Chicago, and Minneapolis/Saint Paul among the most defining cities of the Midwest.
I get a lot more sun in Champaign than I do in Ann Arbor or Lansing, ergo, it's the sunbelt no matter how better the tans are on the beaches of San Diego, or how high Blagojevich and Friends pump taxes and fees and union pay.

I would admit to secretly liking various aspects of the Cleveland area, but that would expose the man behind the curtain. For the meantime, "Northeast Ohio abused me as a child" works just as well. I find it interesting that Akron/Cleveland has about the same metro population as St Louis. St. Louis "feels" smaller, and considering how many hours it is from Champaign-Urbana, I really have to want to see the big river to go down there.

Cleveland is a smaller Chicago without the diversity and with a lot of obnoxious lake effect snow. The winter I lived in NE Ohio, I went skiing twice ... the snow otherwise made driving difficult, or it was just too damn cold to bother with Boston Mills/Brandywine.

The serious answer is that it's a cultural thing, Michigan vs. Ohio. Indiana, Missouri, and Wisconsin don't irk me as much as Ohio. I'd rather live in Iowa than Ohio! (Katie Couric is agnostic on the issue, because she still doesn't know the difference. )

I'd rather live in the Chicago area, but given the same pay for comparable jobs, I might consider Lakewood and commute into Cleveland on the Shoreway. Chicago is way too expensive, and the suburbs are boring prairie flat.

I'll make it up to Minneapolis probably next summer again for the first time in a decade. I have visited or lived on all Big Ten campuses (was a student at Michigan and now Illinois; I have family and professional ties with Penn State; visited Iowa and Wisconsin for the first time this summer), with the exception of U-Minnesota Twin Cities.
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