U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Halloween!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 10-07-2010, 04:30 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,601,876 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Wisconsin was included in the Corn Belt by proxy; I was using east/west and north/south extremes, and Wisconsin was included without mentioning it..

I would say that the Dairy Belt extends from northern New England all the way to Minnesota, and at the peak of its influence in the state of Wisconsin..

I use "belts" as continuous areas; you can't have any separation of land if you're calling it a belt...

The real hybrid state is Minnesota: part Corn Belt, part Wheat Belt, and part Dairy Belt..
How about the state of Misery (aka, Missouri)?

Part Cotton Belt, part Corn Belt, part Wheat Belt?

Then there's where I live:

'The Snowmobile Trails For Flatlanders Belt'.

Extends from about Bemidji, Mn. to about Marquette, Mi.

 
Old 10-07-2010, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Chicago
36,147 posts, read 56,171,616 times
Reputation: 24854
I'm always amused at the term "flatlanders" as if upper Wisconsin were the Alps or something.
 
Old 10-08-2010, 07:06 AM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,601,876 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
I'm always amused at the term "flatlanders" as if upper Wisconsin were the Alps or something.
Compared to Illinois it is the Rockies.

In Southern Ill. you do get the 'Shawnee Foothills', but most of our weekend snowmobilers come out of Chi-town or Springfield, which are as flat as SC's Lowcountry.
 
Old 10-08-2010, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Upper Midwest
1,804 posts, read 1,855,341 times
Reputation: 1563
On the outset, some people would look at that map and think "Montana... WTH?" I can see the arguement though. I have lived in Montana for years and I've been through that part of the state depicted in that yellow shading multiple times. Overall, I have to respectfully disagree. The terrain IS part of the plains, but it is also rocky.
I think it is more accurate to place it in with the Mountain States/Northwest.

And I also agree with a previous comment - Montanans would scoff. They should be honored... but they wouldn't be.

Last edited by MSPLove; 10-08-2010 at 07:22 AM..
 
Old 10-08-2010, 11:24 PM
 
2,482 posts, read 2,026,580 times
Reputation: 1310
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
State lines don't mean anything when it comes to regional boundaries (Census Bureau definitions aside). There's nothing Midwestern about Cairo, Illinois. Nothing. It's not only the South, but the Deep South. It's part of the Mississippi Delta. The city is closer to Mississippi than Chicago, and St. Louis (a border city) is the same distance away as Mississippi. It's an accident of geography that it's in the same state as Chicago.
Southern Illinois is the Deep South now? I guess that makes Georgia downright Caribbean. Steel drums and drinks with umbrellas in valdosta.

Some people will stretch to any limit to distance themselves from areas they don't want their precious city to be associated with. Geesh
 
Old 10-08-2010, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
974 posts, read 1,526,507 times
Reputation: 751
The OP's map is drawn too large. The Great Plains begin at the 100th meridian and end at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The Midwest is the area east and north of the Missouri River and west of Columbus, Ohio as shown on this map:

Midwest and Great Plains States Map/Quiz Printout - EnchantedLearning.com
 
Old 10-09-2010, 09:31 AM
Status: "Semi-retired. working some, taking off some." (set 5 days ago)
 
9,801 posts, read 10,991,471 times
Reputation: 4999
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
State lines don't mean anything when it comes to regional boundaries (Census Bureau definitions aside). There's nothing Midwestern about Cairo, Illinois. Nothing. It's not only the South, but the Deep South. It's part of the Mississippi Delta. The city is closer to Mississippi than Chicago, and St. Louis (a border city) is the same distance away as Mississippi. It's an accident of geography that it's in the same state as Chicago.
Oh c'mon Kazoopilot!

You are usually as asute and in the ballpark as anyone when it comes to deliniating major regions and sub-regions of the same. But that ANY part of Illiniois is "Deep South" stretches things to the Outer Limits!

Sure, southern parts of the state have some Southern characteristics...most of us agree. And yes, on a color-shaded map which trancends absolute state boundary lines, that small area might be properly classified as "South".

But Deep South? No way. Hell, even the states that part of Illiniois borders are not considered Deep South. Southern, yes, but not Deep South Southern. Tell someone in the Mississippi Delta area -- or anywhere else in the heart of Dixie -- that Cairo, Illinois, is part of the Deep South and you would likely not get an answer as they would be hysterical with laughter! LOL

I am not trying to be a smart-a$$, nor patronizing, in the least...but this contention of yours is absolutely mind-boggling!

At its broadest definition, the Deep South starts starts in eastern North Carolina, stretches as a crecent west along the Gulf South states to end in East Texas. And up along the Mississippi River to take in delta areas of Arkansas and Tennessee. It doesn't go any further west or north.

Of course, I can't prove this, but I would be willing to bet that even most residents of Cairo do not consider themselves to live in the Deep South!
 
Old 10-17-2010, 10:18 PM
 
27 posts, read 34,744 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
I'd say Minnesota and Wisconsin make up the "Midwest Core." Iowa is a Lower Midwest state with some Southern influence in the southern 1/3 of the state (I'm not saying Iowa is in the South, just that it has Southern influence typical of the Lower Midwest). Parts of Illinois are in the South.
Partly right, partly wrong. Right about southern Iowa. Wrong about Iowa being lower midwest. It is, in fact, central midwest.

Parts of Iowa (NE, for example) are geographically and ethnically very much "upper midwest." For example, NE Iowa has ice caves in summer in its bluffs, and fir stands which you'll only find in the Canadian Rockies, surviving since the last ice age. Ethnically, this area is very Norwegian or very German Catholic, similar to the ethnic makeup of, say, great swaths of Minnesota.

Finally, look at the map. Parts of Iowa lie north of parts of Canada, not to mention upper midwestern cities like Madison, Milwaukee, and Chicago.

I know that from MN, everything looks lower....
 
Old 10-18-2010, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 4,169,216 times
Reputation: 1244
I can go with this definition of the Midwest.
 
Old 10-18-2010, 02:35 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,601,876 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by fattigmann View Post
Partly right, partly wrong. Right about southern Iowa. Wrong about Iowa being lower midwest. It is, in fact, central midwest.

Parts of Iowa (NE, for example) are geographically and ethnically very much "upper midwest." For example, NE Iowa has ice caves in summer in its bluffs, and fir stands which you'll only find in the Canadian Rockies, surviving since the last ice age. Ethnically, this area is very Norwegian or very German Catholic, similar to the ethnic makeup of, say, great swaths of Minnesota.

Finally, look at the map. Parts of Iowa lie north of parts of Canada, not to mention upper midwestern cities like Madison, Milwaukee, and Chicago.

I know that from MN, everything looks lower....
Really?

Isle Royale, which state owns that?

And is there much of a difference between 47' 20"N, and 49' 05"N (approximations) as far as ecology/human culture goes?

We have a name for the area which contains Madison and Milwaukee, fyi:

'Illinois Lite.'

There is something called a 'Mississippi River Culture' that starts around LaCrosse, and extends down to at least Galena, Ill., if not lower

It makes that entire region different than areas North and East.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top