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Old 07-04-2007, 01:47 AM
 
Location: New York
2,003 posts, read 4,394,805 times
Reputation: 1990

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Didn't pick up on your sarcasm, thats how far gone I am.


More time? I spent 6 years living in various place around the country. Its just not for me. Master planned communities are like hanging out with wax dummies, it this a real place? Then you drive around in these places and they are all the same, stocked with big box mall after big box mall.

The only places I found that suited me were Lake Tahoe NV, Saratoga Springs NY and Aspen CO, but then again I was on holiday so of course I loved it in those places.


When I have spent considerable time in places like Denver, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Atlanta, Dallas, SOCAL, NOCAL, and Florida and all of these places are like the same place. They all have the same Wal-Marts, 7-11s and McDonalds and I do not care for these places.
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Old 07-04-2007, 07:23 AM
 
Location: New York
2,744 posts, read 2,839,623 times
Reputation: 854
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettea1 View Post
So we bring bagels back on the 1.5 hour plane ride. Makes everyone happy!
H&H ships.
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Old 07-04-2007, 07:28 AM
 
Location: New York
2,744 posts, read 2,839,623 times
Reputation: 854
Quote:
Originally Posted by samyn on the green View Post
When I have spent considerable time in places like Denver, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Atlanta, Dallas, SOCAL, NOCAL, and Florida and all of these places are like the same place. They all have the same Wal-Marts, 7-11s and McDonalds and I do not care for these places.

Yeah but you aren't living the NYC lifestyle living in the outer boroughs, except for the rent you pay.

And owning property means having a backyard where you can actually bbq.... and having a space big enough that you can have more than 3 friends over without your place being filled over capacity.

(Having dinner parties is something we really enjoy doing.)

I've been to places elsewhere that have cultural activities. After all, you don't need a choice of 5,000 Italian restaraunts. You only need 10. You don't need a choice of 200 activities, half of which will cost you over $100 to participate in. (The whole family). You just need a choice of 5.
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Old 07-04-2007, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 15,202,266 times
Reputation: 1076
First off, I'd say don't move. The city is already loosing a lot of good middle class people.

If you do have to move though, look into Philadelphia. Its almost the same dynamic as NYC with the Northeast culture, albeit slightly different. They eat cheesesteaks all the time, which are rare up here, and there's more black people & less random immigrants from Asia & Latin America. There is however also more white people in Philadelphia, lots of Italians & Irish.

The weather is slightly warmer, which during the winter can make a difference. I lived outside of Philly for a couple ofyears and sometimes when it would be snowing in NYC, it would only be raining in Philly. Philly isn't Washington DC with their one snow storm a year, but it is definitely better than NYC when it comes to winter.

Also the best thinga bout Philly is the cheap housing. You can buy a 3br/4br row house in a nice middle class neighborhood (think Southern Brooklyn) for $200k or less. If you look around you can find some row homes going for closer to $150k.

As SAMYN said, most of the rest of the USA is pretty dull. Maybe this will change in the next couple of decades, but I doubt it. Living in a random housing development that is a 10-20 minute drive from anything seems really boring to me. Personally I love to walk to a lot to places, and it is hard to do something like that in anywhere else besides the Northeast (and Chicago & San Fran I suppose). Where I currently live I can walk down the street to the corner store and pick up a newspaper & get something to eat. You can't do something very basic like that in the rest of the country. You have to hop in your car and drive for 10 minutes. The rest of the country has a very different lifestyle than this area I suppose, its definitely something to think about.
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Old 07-04-2007, 10:25 AM
 
1,516 posts, read 6,152,468 times
Reputation: 521
Quote:
Originally Posted by roseba View Post
H&H ships.
Um, yeah, have you tried the frozen version vs. the live fresh hot smell from 80th street? I'm so picky I won't even go to the East Side H&H, let alone have them ship them here! But if you're up for the shipping, you'll be happy to know that there's a kosher butcher in the Emory/Toco Hills area that bakes H&H bagels every day. Gets the dough sent in.
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Old 07-04-2007, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,367 posts, read 12,976,945 times
Reputation: 5348
Why not be bold like I did and leave the east coast all together? I moved to Seattle and never looked back. Sometimes change is good. New York is great but sometimes people get tired of the same old thing. You can hike, ski and swim. I love Seattle weather. Not too hot and not too cold. Its such a cool laid back city. Semi dense but very walkable and very bike friendly. Fantastic downtown with major shopping and entertainment. The Seattle economy is great and getting a job here in you and your husbands fields would not be a problem.
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:04 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,767,418 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
GOD's hometown, if you ask me.
Ha!! Yeah, right.
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Old 07-04-2007, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Palm Springs, CA
74 posts, read 238,509 times
Reputation: 44
We are kind of in the same situation. We are looking to find an area where we have some urban amenities; decent restaurants, being able to walk down the street to get whatever you need, parks for the dog, etcetera. We do not want to have to drive everywhere or have a 2 hour commute to work. We also want to be able to have a house with a small yard for the dog and BBQ's etcetera. San Francisco is great but totally unaffordable!

We are looking at Providence RI (reasonably affordable), and you are still in an urban area (2 hours to NYC), 1 hour to Boston downtown (by train or car).
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Old 07-04-2007, 02:54 PM
 
Location: New York
2,003 posts, read 4,394,805 times
Reputation: 1990
Default Other East Coast options

You may be on to something with Providence or Philly. I did live in Philly in the late 90's and thought it was OK. Similar dynamic to NYC but much cheaper. Food was excellent and the working class everyday type of food was even better than NY. The city is mostly Italian/Irish/Black while the suburbs are suburbs are strait up white/black. The people there were friendly.

Like Mead said I need to walk out my door and be able to pick up a paper or a bite, do not want to be marooned out in palookaville surrounded by nothing but momo's.
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 15,202,266 times
Reputation: 1076
Are there any walkable/high-density parts of the USA that I'm missing? I think all of them are either in the Northeast, Chicago, or San Francisco.

Most of the older mid-west cities and rust-belt cities in upstate NY & PA seemed to have emptied out over the past couple of decades.

All of the newly developed cities in the Sun-belt seem to be built with this housing-development mentality. Of course there are some older cities in the South that are the exception to this rule, New Orleans and Charleston come to mind, but just about every other city that I can think of in this country are designed in the same low-density, strip malls, big box store, bad public transportation and lots of freeways design.

Apparently a lot of people enjoy this design, otherwise 70% of America wouldn't be living in rural or suburban areas. However, its definitely not for me.
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