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Old 07-08-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,727 posts, read 6,023,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Lots of Scots settled in Canada, and some of them or their descendants moved to the US, so they show up on the records as Canadian immigrants.
All of my dadís grandparents were Canadian but can trace their ancestry to Scotland, my great-great grandfather was the founder of the Wilson Beach Baptist Church on Campobello Island N.B. which I could see from my grandparents kitchen window in Eastport Maine.

There are still July 12th celebrations in the Maritime Provinces.
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Old 07-08-2018, 11:59 AM
 
28 posts, read 6,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Right. At least 100 years ago, my Scots-Irish ancestors in America became Methodists and have been ever since.
You should just say Scottish, not Scots-Irish. Like I said, they weren't called Scots-Irish by the original American Colonists as a derogatory term. Also, Scots-Irish also indicates that these Scots had Irish blood also, which they didn't. Before your (Scots-Irish) ancestors came here to the U.S., they were known as Ulster Scots.
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Old 07-08-2018, 03:45 PM
Status: "The best view is after the hardest climb." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
42,417 posts, read 33,875,589 times
Reputation: 59374
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoAngelo View Post
You should just say Scottish, not Scots-Irish. Like I said, they weren't called Scots-Irish by the original American Colonists as a derogatory term. Also, Scots-Irish also indicates that these Scots had Irish blood also, which they didn't. Before your (Scots-Irish) ancestors came here to the U.S., they were known as Ulster Scots.
Who knows - I also have Irish ancestry (had my DNA tested) so they may have been truly "Scot-Irish" - in fact, the last names of women who married into the Scottish line sound English and Irish, so who knows?

I don't really care since I actually AM Scottish and Irish as well as English, with a smattering of Scandinavian and Finnish, and German and French. My ancestors were Vikings and "north men" and I think that's cool. I also think it's cool that my current last name, via my husband, is an Irish last name. So I can wear a "Kiss Me, I'm Irish" T-shirt on St Paddy's Day with impunity. But I also think some men look fabulous in kilts, and I love me some Outlander! LOL
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:30 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,061 posts, read 2,796,352 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoAngelo View Post
You should just say Scottish, not Scots-Irish. Like I said, they weren't called Scots-Irish by the original American Colonists as a derogatory term. Also, Scots-Irish also indicates that these Scots had Irish blood also, which they didn't. Before your (Scots-Irish) ancestors came here to the U.S., they were known as Ulster Scots.
Only thing you get into here is Scottish doesn't necessarily mean the same thing as Scots-Irish or Ulster Scots. There is a Lowland/Highland split in Scotland, and as far as I know very few of the Highland Scots were involved with the plantation of Ulster. Someone can have Scottish ancestry & not be Scots-Irish.

I think that there were also "Scots-Irish" that were simply from the northern border of England before they moved to Ulster. Scots-Irish is a misnomer for sure, but it is the description typically used in America for those who lived along the Anglo-Scottish border & moved to Ulster.
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Old 07-09-2018, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Brew City
3,443 posts, read 2,109,083 times
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It's hard to hide with a Mc- surname. Although it's my married name. German for life!
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Old 07-09-2018, 01:08 PM
Status: ""I yam what I yam, and that's all what I yam." -- Popeye" (set 7 hours ago)
 
Location: New Mexico
5,534 posts, read 3,137,546 times
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My 'Mc' name is Irish. They probably went back and forth to Scotland 1000 years ago but they are Irish and many dropped the 'Mc' around 1900.
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Old 07-09-2018, 03:53 PM
Status: "The best view is after the hardest climb." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
42,417 posts, read 33,875,589 times
Reputation: 59374
My Irish surname is an Anglicized version of a Gaelic word, which I think is pretty cool, though most people don't realize that's the root of it. In fact, though it's Anglicized, they often assume that it's an Eastern European name and I say, "Yes, I know it sounds Eastern European but it's actually Irish." Put my husband in a newsboy hat and he looks like he was cast in some sort of movie about The Troubles!

I like it though. And my grandmother was Scottish and Irish through and through (with the red hair and milky white skin to attest to it!) on both sides of her family and her maiden name was Kirkpatrick. Her family was mostly from the Scottish Lowlands, Ireland, and then most of my other British ancestors hailed from Northumberland so all I can really say is that for centuries, I've had ancestors fighting on both sides of various borders - from England, to Ireland, even to the American Revolution where I had both Tories and Revolutionary soldiers fighting each other.

No wonder I sometimes feel like I'm my own worst enemy! LOL
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:10 PM
 
28 posts, read 6,413 times
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There are too many famous Scottish Americans to name, so I am only posting some of the more well-known ones.

SOME FAMOUS SCOTTISH AMERICANS

Pioneers
Sam Houston
Daniel Boone
Presidents
Andrew Jackson
James Buchanan
Ulysses S. Grant
Woodrow Wilson
Grover Cleveland
Harry Truman
Lyndon B. Johnson
Richard Nixon
Jimmy Carter
George H. W. Bush
George W. Bush
Bill Clinton
Military
George S. Patton
Douglas McArthur
John McCain
Singers
Johnny Cash
Dolly Parton
Reba McEntire
Loretta Lynn
Elvis Presley
Axle Rose
Hank Williams
Crystal Gayle
Charlie Daniels
Actors
John Wayne
Mel Gibson
Burt Lancaster
Steve Martin
Debbie Reynolds
Brad Pitt
Shirley MacLaine
Clint Eastwood
Entrepreneurs
Arthur Davidson (One of the founders of Harley-Davidson Motorcycles)
Jack Daniels
Bill Gates
John D. Rockefeller
Astronauts
John Glenn
Neil Armstrong
Buzz Aldrin
Others
Edgar Allen Poe
Stephen King
Mark Twain
Wyatt Earp
Billy The Kid
Joseph A. Campbell (Founder of Campbell soups)
W.K Kellogg (Breakfast Cereals)
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Old 01-10-2019, 10:20 AM
 
1,058 posts, read 686,109 times
Reputation: 999
Daniel Boone was 50% English from Devon and 50 % Welsh.?? His home village is Bradninch in Devon, I know because I've been there. You just cant blurt out waffle
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Old 01-10-2019, 11:31 AM
 
28 posts, read 6,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
Daniel Boone was 50% English from Devon and 50 % Welsh.?? His home village is Bradninch in Devon, I know because I've been there. You just cant blurt out waffle
The Scots-Irish (Ulster Scots) were mostly Scottish, but there were a small amount of English settlers mixed in there with them. You are correct England Dan. I have gotten that information from here...https://www.amazon.com/Born-Fighting.../dp/0767916891, without verifying that he was indeed of Scottish ancestry and not one of the few of English ancestry.

Unfortunately, I can't edit it. Time for me to do so has obviously run out. But, I am not wrong in that he was considered of being descended from the Scots-Irish (Ulster Scots), because he was. My point here was to name famous "Scottish" Americans, without carefully excluding the Ulster Scots (Scots-Irish) that were of English decent.
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