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Old 10-11-2010, 03:24 PM
 
688 posts, read 1,245,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
When settlers headed West they tended to go straight West.

The Southwest received many people from the Southeast, especially after the Civil War.

In rural AZ you hear some Southernish speech but it's definitely not a Southern accent.
In Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, etc., I haven't heard anything from locals (except what few I heard that transplanted there from Ky. or North Carolina or wherever) that sounded anything like a southern accent. Their accent sounds in a lot of cases like anouncers you hear on tv or radio. If I heard any accents at all from locals, some in Conrad and Shelby Montana areas had a little Canadian twang mixed in their speech, other than that, sounded like news reporters. However, in Texas, Oklahoma, some parts of New Mexico and maybe even a little in Arizona, maybe a little in extreme southern Kansas along Oklahoma border, I did hear southern accents (and being from Ky. myself, felt at home in those places, but I'll say this for Montana, some of kindest, gentlest people I've seen anywhere).
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Old 10-11-2010, 03:29 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 6,827,613 times
Reputation: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxpwas View Post
There is a group of people living in Brazil in and near Americana (in Sao Paulo region) that are called "Confederados", in that at least part of their ancestry is from Civil War area South. Over time, these Caucasian people from South have intermarried with locals, so person might have White Tennessean or Georgian, etc., mixed with Portuguese, South American rainforest Indian, Italian, possibly even black Afro-Brazilian. These people even have Confederate heritage events, rebel flags and all, often fly a Confederate along with a Brazilian flag. Anyway, have a great day!
Rita Lee!

Love her music.

Big colony of 'Confederados' live in Santarem in Para (?) Estado.

Mostly former South Carolinians and Georgians. All those families now very inbred.
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Old 10-11-2010, 04:14 PM
 
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A lot of people in the rural west have 'country' accents which sound kind of southern.
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Old 10-11-2010, 05:18 PM
 
688 posts, read 1,245,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
Rita Lee!

Love her music.

Big colony of 'Confederados' live in Santarem in Para (?) Estado.

Mostly former South Carolinians and Georgians. All those families now very inbred.
I'm not so sure. A lot of them intermarried into Brazilian families (pictures of them that I saw on another web site, this was several years ago, they didn't look too lilly white to me). By the way, what does the singer Rita Lee have to do with this? Is she part Confederado heritage, or what? Anyway, you are right, she is good performer (I wouldn't know who she was except at a bookstore in Lexington, Ky., I heard some of music being played on P.A. sytem, I asked worker who that was singing, he said Rita Lee from Brazil). Speaking of Geechie, I met some people in Savannah Georgia once that said (they sounded a little like Jamaicans or Haitians in the way they talked, very interesting people) they were Geechie, kinda like the Gullahs in the Hilton Head and Charleston areas of South Carolina (I'd seen some Gullahs in South Carolina south of Myrtle Beach and more down toward Charleston and islands south of there before that, but had never heard of Geechie til I met the ones in Savannah). Have a good day.
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Old 10-12-2010, 12:02 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 6,827,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxpwas View Post
I'm not so sure. A lot of them intermarried into Brazilian families (pictures of them that I saw on another web site, this was several years ago, they didn't look too lilly white to me). By the way, what does the singer Rita Lee have to do with this? Is she part Confederado heritage, or what? Anyway, you are right, she is good performer (I wouldn't know who she was except at a bookstore in Lexington, Ky., I heard some of music being played on P.A. sytem, I asked worker who that was singing, he said Rita Lee from Brazil). Speaking of Geechie, I met some people in Savannah Georgia once that said (they sounded a little like Jamaicans or Haitians in the way they talked, very interesting people) they were Geechie, kinda like the Gullahs in the Hilton Head and Charleston areas of South Carolina (I'd seen some Gullahs in South Carolina south of Myrtle Beach and more down toward Charleston and islands south of there before that, but had never heard of Geechie til I met the ones in Savannah). Have a good day.
Rita Lee indeed has Confederado heritage.

In fact many of the remaining families have dropped their original surnames and instead adopted the name of 'Lee' in honor of R. E. Lee.

The few families which moved to Brazil were very racist in nature, and only moved there because Brazil still had slavery.

Little did they know that:

A. The Portuguese interbred with both the African slaves they brought over and the indigenous tribes to a degree which would have nauseated the average anglo-American of that day.

B. Brazil would also outlaw slavery (circa 1880, I believe).

Therefore the original Southerners arrainged marriages among themselves. But with small numbers, and a majority of those who did come down, going back after about a decade or so, those left simply stayed in the same end of the gene pool, so to speak.

They were absorbed into the local populations and are now only an historical footnote.

Gullah is a language- a patois- of 18th-century peasant English and Scotch coupled with various African languages (Mandinka, Fulani). It was spoken by both whites and blacks, and mulattoes, in the rice growing regions of S.C. and Ga.

Geechie (also spelled 'Geechee') is a person who is from that (now extinct- or damn near so) culture.

Last edited by Geechie North; 10-12-2010 at 12:30 PM..
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Old 10-15-2010, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,359 posts, read 6,345,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
Not them..but Idaho n other corn fields probably have some sort of accent.
false...

Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
Idaho doesn't have corn fields ..... or Southern accents.
true...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rxpwas View Post
In Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, etc., I haven't heard anything from locals (except what few I heard that transplanted there from Ky. or North Carolina or wherever) that sounded anything like a southern accent. Their accent sounds in a lot of cases like anouncers you hear on tv or radio. If I heard any accents at all from locals, some in Conrad and Shelby Montana areas had a little Canadian twang mixed in their speech, other than that, sounded like news reporters. However, in Texas, Oklahoma, some parts of New Mexico and maybe even a little in Arizona, maybe a little in extreme southern Kansas along Oklahoma border, I did hear southern accents (and being from Ky. myself, felt at home in those places, but I'll say this for Montana, some of kindest, gentlest people I've seen anywhere).
true...

Quote:
Originally Posted by brzzz View Post
A lot of people in the rural west have 'country' accents which sound kind of southern.
false (If by West you mean Montana, WA state, Idaho, Oregon, Northern Cal, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado)

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
In Eastern WA/North ID, some people have a redneckish accent, I wouldn't call it southern, but I'd call it totally informal.
Up there, they call them 'hicks'...Hicks, at least when I was there, were like country boys, but without the southern connection...
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Old 10-15-2010, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
12,840 posts, read 23,199,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Time and Space View Post

Up there, they call them 'hicks'...Hicks, at least when I was there, were like country boys, but without the southern connection...
They sure do love that word "rig".
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:13 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
181 posts, read 229,632 times
Reputation: 103
I find this topic to be fascinating.

I grew up in the Mojave desert on it's western edge, 80 miles north and a world away from Los Angeles. The little towns of Boron and North Edwards to be exact. These little towns and others were largely populated by Dust Bowl Okies and Arkies looking for work during the Great Depression.

So, growing up was an interesting mix of cultures. A large portion of my generation's parents, and especially grandparents, were Okies/Arkies. So even though we were close to LA and even in the LA media market, we also heard southern/country accents and colloquilisms everyday, everywhere, from home to school to church and wherever! Made for an interesting mix, to say the least.

My dad was born and raised there, and due to the large family influence, actually had a bit of a southern twang that got very strong whenever he was talking to someone else with a southern accent. Always cracked me up. His sisters still have a bit of that too. Guess it's because Grandpa kept his thick Okie twang all his life, and Grandma too, although she was from just over the state line in Galena, KS, so didn't have as much of one.

Myself, I discovered as an adult that, despite my attempts to NOT have the accent, certain things slipped in. I used to say, and sometimes still do, that I was "fixin" to do something. The word "orange" came out "arnge". Lol. Now, I just see all that as part of my heritage and something unique to be proud of.
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:23 PM
 
2,739 posts, read 4,073,055 times
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Born and raised in California but, oddly, I think have a trace of a Southern accent. Not sure how I picked it up. Maybe from teachers? I liiike ta post on city daytuh, yes, ah do.
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Old 07-04-2012, 04:56 PM
 
3,280 posts, read 4,602,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Nothing I hate worse than a fake Southern accent. I love the movie 'Steel Magnolias', but I have to laugh when I hear Julia Roberts say "Mamaaaah, they put rubahs on my car", LOL.

The only one that even sound remotely Southern in that movie is Dolly Parton, and that's because she was the only Southerner in it.
You're wrong. Julia Roberts is a native of Marietta, Georgia. So her accent is genuine. Please check your facts before you spread misinformation.
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