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Old 07-08-2007, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Henderson NV
1,134 posts, read 914,825 times
Reputation: 82

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rd2007 View Post
speaking of crack, pass the pipe to the left please.. that made no sense at all. You obviously have never been to Chicago and/or read one thing about the city and its history..
and Senior Member is the default title change when a person passes 100 posts on a vBulletin board.. I just haven't got around to changing it to something quirky like LAla land fanboi...
I think everything here is accurate, uhh.. Mrs. O'Leary's cow, Daisy, kicked over a lantern in a barn or shed in 1871 and started the Great Chicago Fire. The cow winked and said, " There'll be a hot time in the old town tonight! " Other than my hometown, Chicago is my favorite big city and yes, I've never been. Now, how is that? Well, It seems to be the default setting for BIG AMERICAN CITY. It seems to be .. normal. Not boring, but normal. There's nothing glamourous or hoity-toity about it, like you would have with N.Y., or L. A., my hometown, or Las Vegas, where I now live. It's just a big city. Big rail yards, big hub location, big manufacturing location. Great people with character and stuff. A real inconvincing turnoff when Mike and the Bulls threatened to turn Chicago into a celebrity haven. Just doesn't fit. Chicago's too meat and potatoes..., and speaking of defaults, thanks for letting me know!! I'M A SENIOR MEMBER AND I DIDN'T EVEN KNOW IT!! Oh, now it's on!

 
Old 07-08-2007, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Wiesbaden, Germany
13,807 posts, read 26,355,404 times
Reputation: 3989
Pizza alone makes Chicago a great city.. there's also this little natural history museum, a great lake, the tallest building in the country (now), multi-cultural areas etc...
 
Old 07-17-2008, 01:43 PM
 
212 posts, read 831,671 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbagirl View Post
I have to stick with Detroit as it is the only one I know well enough to cast any kind of vote on. Depressed and crime ridden, dirty and scary... and the poor road condition of the surrounding highways don't make it any better.
Even though I have never been to Detroit, I would have to agree. There was a list of cities that are the worst for crime in the U.S. on AOL, and Detroit was one of the first few. Not to offend anyone who lives in Detroit. Every city has its positives and negatives. Detroit was number one on the list of most dangerous cities for 2007.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:11 PM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,362,165 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
I want to start out by saying I'm a big fan of Pittsburgh myself. But here's Pittsburgh's problem: its infrastructure and amenities were built to accommodate a city-proper population of nearly 700,000 people and a metro population of about 2.7 million, with the respective tax and philanthropic bases to support them. Today, the city population is about 300,000 and the metro population about 2.1 million. Furthermore the philanthropic fortunes that gave birth to and continue to support Pittsburgh's world-class institutions were made about a century ago.

There's still some old money floating around in Pittsburgh -- Theresa Heinz Kerry being the most visible example -- but a lot of that old money has already been invested in the arts and other projects and it is not being replaced; and some of it has fled for greener pastures where the return on the investment is better than what you'll get in Pittsburgh these days. Pittsburgh's cultural institutions are still very respectable, but as time passes they are having a harder and harder time shaking the money tree for foundation grants. The well is drying up.

Meanwhile, the tax-supported basic infrastructure is straining under a lethal combination age, cash-strapped coffers and a shrinking tax base. You may not know this, but the City of Pittsburgh essentially declared bankruptcy and its financial affairs are now managed by the state. That's how bad the fiscal situation is there, because there are only 300,000 people left to support an infrastructure designed to support over twice that population. City services are a mess. The schools are a mess. City departments are chronically overwhelmed and understaffed. Many streets have been reduced to strips of moon craters with almost no budget to repave them. The city's response to the loss of tax base has been to raise taxes on those who remain, further increasing the incentive to flee for the 'burbs, or leave the area altogether.

And that's exactly what is happening: When I lived there just 10 years ago, the city population was estimated at 350,000. Before that it was 500K, 600K, nearly 700K as far back as the 60s. Today, it's 300K and shrinking. Tomorrow it may be 275K, then 250K. I have to believe the city won't completely hollow out; eventually the population bleeding has to stop. But right now there appears to be no end in sight, and some day there may be nobody left to support that massive infrastructure and those erstwhile top-notch cultural institutions.

As surprisingly nice a city as Pittsburgh is, especially given its general reputation around the country, it's not always easy to tell on first impressions that the place is seriously white-knuckling it for survival. It won't take much more than a hard shove for Pittsburgh to become the next Detroit. What's truly disheartening is that a lot of its own residents have essentially given up and adopted a fatalistic attitude that the plunge is inevitable. Fortunately, they are currently being offset by other residents who have tremendous civic pride of an intensity that I have never witnessed anywhere else I've lived, and they are doing everything in their power to keep the city vital. The two sides are currently waged in an epic battle, and right now it's not entirely clear who is going to win. As for me, I'm cheering on the civic-pride crowd, but from a safe distance for now.

On a final note... again, as someone who likes Pittsburgh, take it from someone who has lived both in Pittsburgh and Chicago: there is not ANYTHING near the sheer diversity of people, places and things in Pittsburgh as there is in Chicago; not in terms of ethnic diversity, income diversity, ideological diversity, and sheer volume of cultural, dining, nightlife, and entertainment options. Pittsburgh is not a boring city by any stretch, but it's got absolutely nothing on Chicago.

Wow, it sounds like Pittsburgh is falling into the ocean................... WOw...........
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,243,749 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesomo.2000 View Post
Wow, it sounds like Pittsburgh is falling into the ocean................... WOw...........
Compared to what it was, and especially what it could be.... yeah, it pretty much is. With the willing support of a fair portion of its population no less, which makes it all the more frustrating.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:19 PM
 
Location: PacNW
12 posts, read 21,529 times
Reputation: 14
Philadelphia. Dirty, parochial and proud.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:24 PM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,362,165 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Compared to what it was, and especially what it could be.... yeah, it pretty much is. With the willing support of a fair portion of its population no less, which makes it all the more frustrating.
When Pittsburgh was 600,000, people were thrown in poverty, the town was very overcrowded, and living conditions were deplorable. It was a polluted smoggy mess.

Now, It is one of the most livable cities in the nation, living conditions are at the best it ever was in the city, and it is not nearly overcrowded.

You act like the city is falling into the ocean. It is just naturally sizing down from the steel days. Estimates already show the population is on a rebound again. The average age of it's citizens are back to the average with the rest of the nation. I don't understand where you are comming from.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,243,749 times
Reputation: 29451
Whereas you act like the place is now a flawless shining city on the hill that just happens to have the exact perfect population density now that its lost over half its population, with no deplorable living conditions or no poverty and decaying neighborhoods where vacant lots would be a vast improvement to the rows of abandoned houses that are there now. I don't understand where you're coming from either, so at least we have that in common.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:40 PM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,362,165 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Whereas you act like the place is now a flawless shining city on the hill that just happens to have the exact perfect population density now that its lost over half its population, with no deplorable living conditions or no poverty and decaying neighborhoods where vacant lots would be a vast improvement to the rows of abandoned houses that are there now. I don't understand where you're coming from either, so at least we have that in common.
The place is far from flawless, has problems, and it has problems that EVERY american city has. It is true with out a doubt, that the Pittsburgh with 310,000 is a much more livable city then the one with 600,000.

Everybody brings up the topic the Pittsburgh is going to keep lossing it's population and there is going to be two people left to repopulate the town. This is far from happening. The population estimates are levelling off from the collapse in the 80s. The average age finally is equall to the rest of the nation. You will see the population rebound here shortly. (everybody has a different estimate, pitt, cmu, etc).

EVERY city has its problems. Pittsburgh is far from falling into the ocean like you seem to suggest. Relax. Cities like Pheonix, Atlanta, Houston, Las Vegas, etc should have to also worry about their overgrowth.
 
Old 07-17-2008, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,243,749 times
Reputation: 29451
Relax? No skin off my nose whether Pittsburgh comes or goes, really. We simply disagree about Pittsburgh's state of affairs. I have nothing to "relax" about, and I'm not the one who's in reactionary "stop picking on my city! boo hoo!" mode.
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