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Old 10-28-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,196 posts, read 20,739,481 times
Reputation: 7664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Places like ND, SD, KS, etc, are definitely Midwestern in look and feel compared to the mountain west.
The climate in those areas has nothing in common with the Midwest, though. Semi-arid climates support short grass prairie (sagebrush, yucca) and do not support Midwest style agriculture without irrigation. Also, population densities are about 1/5 as much in the Plains compared to the Midwest core and Great Lakes rural areas.
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:28 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,591,782 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I just posted it, you took my quote right out of the post, are you trying to say that you didnt post that?
Have evil gnomes taken over your account, and are posting things for you?


"there are NO significant German communities in the South."



Does not say 'no'.

It says 'no significant'.

And in truth, I am more right than wrong, but not 100% either (see: Texas)
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:28 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,295,553 times
Reputation: 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
This German thing is way overblown.

As posted earlier, Germans are all over.

Means little, except for the extremes.
all over, except in the south. for the reasons stated earlier. missouri having received German immigration is a Midwestern trait, not exclusively midwestern, but a midwestern trait. More specifically it differs the state from the south. you really are quite selective with what you choose to notice.

on a related note, you inquired about roman catholicism. saying
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
data which says RC and Southern are mutually exclusive.
they are necessarily mutually exclusive, but bible belt and roman catholic are. southern Louisiana has never really been considered part of the bible belt. missouri along the Mississippi river, detroit, and southern louisiana were the three main french settlements in what today is the US. we can see this evidenced today by a presence of the Roman catholic church in those areas.

another wave of roman catholics came with the large wave of german and irish immigrants across the midwest. you also see the presence of the catholic chuch in missouri due to that, as ive eluded to earlier.

much of missouri was settled by southerners initially. but they were overwhelmed by the wave of european immigration that defined much of the midwest. they mostly bypassed southern MO, and the cultural traits of the upland south live on there. for the rest of the state, varying degrees of that influence still live in, generally getting milder and milder the further north you go. in places like St Louis, the southern influence is completely gone, and was never really there to begin with.

thats why ive brought on these maps. missouri certainly has a different history than most midwestern states. but when it must be categorized into a region as a whole, it fits best with the midwest.

hopefully that clears everything up.

heres a map of catholics in the USA for reference.
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,196 posts, read 20,739,481 times
Reputation: 7664
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
All the link shows is a map of Missouri.
Yes, you CLICK on the counties to get the statistical data.
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,444 posts, read 17,191,310 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
"there are NO significant German communities in the South."



Does not say 'no'.

It says 'no significant'.

And in truth, I am more right than wrong, but not 100% either (see: Texas)
All I see is an ego the size of Texas, and nothing to back it up.
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,444 posts, read 17,191,310 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Yes, you CLICK on the counties to get the statistical data.
Yeah, I get that, but when I click, it does nothing.
CD has been acting strangely on Firefox again, so who knows.....-shrugs-
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,444 posts, read 17,191,310 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
all over, except in the south. for the reasons stated earlier. missouri having received German immigration is a Midwestern trait, not exclusively midwestern, but a midwestern trait. More specifically it differs the state from the south. you really are quite selective with what you choose to notice.

on a related note, you inquired about roman catholicism. saying

they are necessarily mutually exclusive, but bible belt and roman catholic are. southern Louisiana has never really been considered part of the bible belt. missouri along the Mississippi river, detroit, and southern louisiana were the three main french settlements in what today is the US. we can see this evidenced today by a presence of the Roman catholic church in those areas.

another wave of roman catholics came with the large wave of german and irish immigrants across the midwest. you also see the presence of the catholic chuch in missouri due to that, as ive eluded to earlier.

much of missouri was settled by southerners initially. but they were overwhelmed by the wave of european immigration that defined much of the midwest. they mostly bypassed southern MO, and the cultural traits of the upland south live on there. for the rest of the state, varying degrees of that influence still live in, generally getting milder and milder the further north you go. in places like St Louis, the southern influence is completely gone, and was never really there to begin with.

thats why ive brought on these maps. missouri certainly has a different history than most midwestern states. but when it must be categorized into a region as a whole, it fits best with the midwest.

hopefully that clears everything up.

heres a map of catholics in the USA for reference.
Great, informative post, and love the maps!
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:35 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,591,782 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
all over, except in the south. for the reasons stated earlier. missouri having received German immigration is a Midwestern trait, not exclusively midwestern, but a midwestern trait. More specifically it differs the state from the south. you really are quite selective with what you choose to notice.

on a related note, you inquired about roman catholicism. saying

they are necessarily mutually exclusive, but bible belt and roman catholic are.

heres a map of catholics in the USA for reference.
So parts of N.C. (piedmont/mtns) is not Bible Belt?

Sorry, no sale.

And you and I (re: Germans) both forgot about Texas.

But rthen Germans are allover the joint, so they are not exclusive to the Midwest, either, so moot meet point.
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:36 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,591,782 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
All I see is an ego the size of Texas, and nothing to back it up.
All I see is another insult from someone who takes this way too seriously.

And why is that?
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:38 PM
 
4,465 posts, read 4,591,782 times
Reputation: 766
Bible Belt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


"Geography
The name "Bible Belt" has been applied historically to the South and parts of the Midwest, but is more commonly identified with the South. In a 1961 study, Wilbur Zielinkski delineated the region as the area in which Baptist denominations are the predominant religious affiliation. The region thus defined included most of the Southern United States, including most of Texas and Oklahoma in the southwest, and in the states south of the Ohio River, and extending east to include central West Virginia, Virginia south of Northern Virginia, and parts of Maryland. In addition, the Bible Belt covers parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. A 1978 study by Charles Heatwole identified the Bible Belt as the region dominated by 24 fundamentalist Protestant denominations, corresponding to essentially the same area mapped by Zielinski.[3]
Tweedie (1978)[4] defines the Bible Belt in terms of the audience for religious television. He finds two belts: one more eastern that stretches from central Florida through Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and into Virginia; and another that is more western, moving from central Texas to the Dakotas, and concentrated in Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, and Mississippi.

Notably absent from this belt are the areas of:[citation needed]And I'd love to see the missing cite for those cities mentioned.

And please note, I was NOT speaking of Asheville when not buying parts of NC are not Bible Belt. (see your map, Mr. Wilson)
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