U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-06-2007, 07:20 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,408 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

Hello!
I'm 19, and I just finished high school.
I would like to move to either US or Canada.
I've read that it's harder (don't quote me on this one) to get American citizenship, than Canadian - is it true?
Can someone name +'s & -'s of these two countries?
I would prefer warm weather all year long, but I can live even with 14F in the winter.
Is it hard to get in at universities for an international student? My grades were pretty good, I guess.. 6/10, 7/10 etc.
How long do I have to be living in the US or Canada, before I can apply for a citizenship?
Um, and one more thing - which country has cheaper cost-of-living, and higher wages?
That's it for now, thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-06-2007, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,511,280 times
Reputation: 975
Unless you are a skilled tradesman in a skill that's necessary, neither country will be easy to live in or get into. Do you have any ability to go to college in the US or Canada or at home before you move? What country are you from? What languages do you speak fluently? The US has quotas depending on where you are from. I don't know if Canada does.

Here are links for you: US Citizenship and Immigration Services

and

Citzenship and Immigration Canada

Are there US or Canadian embassies or consulates near you? They could tell you what the situation is for people from your country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 07:54 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,408 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks for your answer!
After you have finished high school - you can go to college almost anywhere in the world, no? (if you can get in, and have the cash)
But I want to go to college in either US or Canada, since I wanna live there.
I am from Eastern Europe, Latvia.
I speak Latvian, Russian and English.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
Are there US or Canadian embassies or consulates near you? They could tell you what the situation is for people from your country.
In fact, there are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,511,280 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumbsUP View Post
Thanks for your answer!
After you have finished high school - you can go to college almost anywhere in the world, no? (if you can get in, and have the cash)
Very welcome! Many colleges try to get international students from different areas to create a diverse campus. The first thing to do is to check with the US embassy about taking a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) test. Everyone will want to know how well you speak English before considering admission. Being fluent in English will help your chances of admission. The TOEIC English test isn't as widely accepted in the US as it is in Europe or elsewhere. As usual, we do things differently!

You will also need to take the Standardized Admission Test (SAT) for college admissions. You can take the test six times a year, also in Riga.

There are some websites that can point you in the right directions.

eduPASS
Education USA
TOEFL testing dates in Riga
SAT information for Latvians
I don't know much about them, but you may find help at The American Latvian Association
Student visa information (http://www.unitedstatesvisas.gov/studying.html - broken link)
Studying in the USA for foreign students (http://www.studyusa.com/default.asp - broken link)
A very widely used guide to US and Canada colleges
Study and Visa information for Canada
Latvian Canadian Cultural Center
Canada Education

I would check these out. They should be helpful.

It is usually easier to get into Canada as a permanent resident but not always. Education is key to making you more desirable not just to immigration services, but to employers. You'll want a good job when you get out of school!

Keep in mind that some people from former eastern bloc countries have a difficult time getting their degrees recognized here in the US. I've met cab drivers in New York who were very well educated but couldn't find work because their degrees weren't recognized by US accretitation organizations. US degrees are good in Canada and Canadian degrees are good in the US but be aware that not all colleges are accredited. You will defintiely want to attend an accredited school.

Here's a FAQ on accreditation. The website is good too!

What course of study were considering? That choice will help tell you which country may be better for you to live in and where you will study. I can point you to job forecasts for various different jobs if I know what you're interested in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 08:55 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,408 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
What course of study were considering? That choice will help tell you which country may be better for you to live in and where you will study. I can point you to job forecasts for various different jobs if I know what you're interested in.
I want to finish 4-year course at some college (or university?), in business & entrepreneurship major. I don't really know the difference between universities and college's in US. It's a bit different in Europe.
After you finish primary school here, you can go to college. And after that to university, or something like that.
Or if you finish high school - you can go straight to university.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
Keep in mind that some people from former eastern bloc countries have a difficult time getting their degrees recognized here in the US.
But if they'll be OK with my degree, and I'll finish 4-year course at some college (or university?) - will I be able to get a normal-paying job?

Oh, and BTW - is it worth trying to win a green card?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,511,280 times
Reputation: 975
We use different terms, but the concept is the same.

Here in the US, colleges are 2 or 4 year post-secondary (high school) institutions that offer undergraduate degrees. Universities are any institutions that offer graduate degrees (Masters and Doctorates) beyond undergraduate degrees. Since nearly all universities have colleges, people use the terms interchangably even though it is not strictly correct to do so. To confuse issues even more, many universities do not differentiate their colleges from their universities so you could get an undergraduate degree with the name of a university on it.

Here's the US system:
  • Kindergarten (beginning ages 4 or 5)
  • Elementary School also known as Primary (years 1-8)
  • High School or Secondary (years 9-12 and confers a high school diploma)
  • College or Undergraduate (2 or 4 years ranging from 13-16 and confers AS, AA, BA or BS)
  • University or Post-graduate (number of years vary but would confer MA, MS, PhD, MD, PsyD, JD, etc.)

Canada uses the same system Europe does so no trouble there. Again, Americans are different (we also don't use the metric system but Canada does).

Degrees in entrepreneurial studies are gaining in popularity and a great way to go. I would combine it with a Masters in Business Administration (MA) if possible, to assure you a way to stay in the US or Canada. What most professionals do is get a job offer after graduation and then the employer helps you get your green card before you start the job. The other way to stay is to prove you've got a working business that employs other people or that you're an investor (you're rich) and prepared to invest money in the country. Right now, however, I wouldn't worry about that until you get to it.

The U.S. News and World Reports puts out a list of the best colleges and universities in the US and Canada based on various criteria.

An excellent magazine, Entrepreneur, puts out a list of the top colleges for entrepreneurial studies. This is the top entrepreneurial magazine in the country.

Another list from CNN.

A decent website focusing on entrepreneurs in school is Young Money.

I don't know about the green card business at all. I'd talk to immigration assistance places or consult an immigration lawyer here in the US.

Hope these help!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 09:54 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,408 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks for your help, I really appreciate it!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
What most professionals do is get a job offer after graduation and then the employer helps you get your green card before you start the job.
After graduating from what? College? If so, how will I be able to get 'Masters in Business Administration', if I will have a job?
One last question - what's the difference between 2 and 4-year college course? With 4-year course you get a better education? (diploma or something?)
From all I've seen - almost all US universities have that 'undergraduate' thing. Is that what I need? (aka college?)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,511,280 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumbsUP View Post
Thanks for your help, I really appreciate it!

After graduating from what? College? If so, how will I be able to get 'Masters in Business Administration', if I will have a job?
Yes, college. Now, if you can get in to a post-graduate program at a university, then you're still on a student visa so that's ok. Whether you must or can work while pursuing an MBA is dependent on your finances and visa permissions. Lot of people work full time and go to college or university at the same time. Schools here are very good about offering evening, weekend, and distance learning courses. A bonus with having a job at the same time is that many employers will either pay part or all of your tuition for a university degree that's important to their business. The MBA is the most commonly reimbursed graduate degree.

Quote:
One last question - what's the difference between 2 and 4-year college course? With 4-year course you get a better education? (diploma or something?)
From all I've seen - almost all US universities have that 'undergraduate' thing. Is that what I need? (aka college?)
A two year college course results in an Assoicate's Degree, which is a step below a Bachelor's Degree (usually 4 years). If you can afford it, you want a Bachelorate to get a good job in business. An advanced degree such as a Master of Business Administration (MBA) will usually put you in the lower tier of middle management in a company right after graduation but will also serve you well as an entrepreneur.

An Associate Degree will sometimes get you a supervisory position in most companies, one step above the regular non-management workers, but not always. To enter lower management usually requires a Bachelor's Degree without prior experience.

Degrees are divided into arts and sciences and while they're commonly divided into years involved, what they're really counting are credits. Schools differ on the number of credits you receive for various degrees, but on average:

To qualify for your degree, you must complete a minimum number of credits. Your course of study and college will determine what number of credits are required to receive a degree. In general, an Associate in Arts (AA) or Associates in Science (AS) is about 60 credits. Bachelor in Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) is about double that at 120 credits. Your course of study determines which type of degree you receive. Associate and Bachelor degrees are undergraduate degrees.

Full-time students take about 12 credits per semester. Some semesters you take more, others you take less. Some colleges use different term systems like quarters or blocks. Each college you look into will tell you what system they use and what they consider full-time and how many credits you will need to graduate with the degree you desire.

Yes, right now you need an undergraduate program.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,511,280 times
Reputation: 975
Even though you're on an entrepreneurial track and, I assume, you have no desire to work for another business (good idea), to get a green card you'll need to do so unless you can get your company off the ground and financed right away. Both Canada and the US want entrepreneurs but generally want to see you employing at least 5 or 6 people in the process. You can get around this with hearings and applications for special consideration, etc.

Nothing says you can't create your own company here in the US and employ yourself! Many people do this but both governments are sensitive to people who do that just to stay here. They will want proof that you're a real business, engaging in commerce. An immigration lawyer will be able to help you in either country because you wouldn't be the typical immigrant.

The reality is that if you have a clean criminal record, a graduate or postgraduate degree from an American or Canadian school, speak fluent English, have an employer who will sponsor you OR you have a viable working business, staying in either country won't be a problem. They will pretty much welcome you with open arms.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2007, 11:04 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,408 times
Reputation: 11
OK, this is a bit confusing.
But I know one thing for sure - I will take the 4-year course.
So, that 4-year course gives you a bachelor's degree?
And after that I can try to get an advanced degree?
Is it worth it to get an advanced degree?
Wage is going to be slightly higher? Or what...
Thanks again!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top