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Old 07-07-2007, 08:08 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,915,658 times
Reputation: 660

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Well, I got the first digit right, anyway.
That you did You were close enough.
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Old 07-07-2007, 08:11 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,915,658 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by M TYPE X View Post
Both employment and the Central Time Zone are HIGHLY overrated. I suggest becoming a hobo in the shadows of the Fort Pitt Tunnel. That way, you can starve to death while admiring the Pittsburgh skyline.

I was in North Carolina recently. You won't die there, at least not physically. It's mentally challenging. Raleigh-Durham is not at all appealing, and Charlotte is basically a financial center with a bunch of sprawl. meh.

Have you considered Ann Arbor, Austin, Madison, etc the usual suspects?
Since when does a time zone matter to people? Well...I guess being in the central time zone does make it a bit easier to just to two different time zones, but as to the PAcific time zone a two hour adjustment can be ROUGH, I've gone there late at night. Time zones overrated hehehehe that made me chuckle
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Old 07-07-2007, 08:38 PM
 
22 posts, read 68,080 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadreamin' View Post
djphrenzy: One major bonus for both Raleigh and Charlotte, there both loaded
with nice looking young ladies, enough said.
Welp. I'm convinced.

One thing that really kind of hooked me immediately when you said North Carolina is the fact the NC has one of the most healthy and vibrant drum and bass scenes in the country from what I hear. So much so that they have a forum which I read quite often: ncdnb.com :: North Carolina Drum 'n' Bass (broken link) Being a drum and bass DJ and Producer, this is a really big plus for me.

If you're not familiar with drum and bass, more info can be found here: Drum and bass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-07-2007, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,237 posts, read 67,405,932 times
Reputation: 15881
Thanks for the kind words, CarolinaDreamin'! I also didn't mean to sound as cold-hearted as I did about North Carolina. In fact, my father was preparing to move us to Charlotte back in 2004 or so for a job offer in the I/T field before an opportunity opened up locally, which points to just how HOT the job market is in NC!

I'll admit that I've also never been to NC in person. I was bored one day and spent 2-3 hours just zooming in and around Lake Norman, Charlotte, and Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill via Google Earth, and while I did find some very attractive-looking in-town neighborhoods (the types with the sidewalks, tree lawns, front porches, etc.), at least half seemed to be those ugly, forboding, "cookie-cutter" sprawl types I alluded to earlier. I realize that most people in America love cul-de-sac living, but it's just not for me; I'd prefer to be able to walk to a grocery store, church, school, or bank if I so chose. You can't do that in suburbia, where mixed-use zoning seems to be strictly-prohibited.

Other than the sprawl issue, I don't really have any "beef" with the Tarheel State. Hell, if my good friend "I LOVE NC" is so head over heels for your state, then it must be doing something right. LOL! I also realize that Raleigh/Durham is growing more quickly than Charlotte, and I didn't mean to make it sound the other way around. Sorry!

I'll admit that Google Earth might not always be a good way to get to know an area from afar (especially when SCRANTON, with an MSA of 600,000, still isn't included in its database! GRRRR!!! ME WANNA SEE MY HOUSE!!!) In the future, I'll be sure to give an area a more fair shot before I come to conclusions.

Have a great night!
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Old 07-08-2007, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Raleigh,NC
351 posts, read 975,778 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Welp. I'm convinced.

One thing that really kind of hooked me immediately when you said North Carolina is the fact the NC has one of the most healthy and vibrant drum and bass scenes in the country from what I hear. So much so that they have a forum which I read quite often: ncdnb.com :: North Carolina Drum 'n' Bass Being a drum and bass DJ and Producer, this is a really big plus for me.

If you're not familiar with drum and bass, more info can be found here: Drum and bass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sounds like one more good reason to check out NC. I'm old school when it comes to music....Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers Band, Traffic, The Who,
Pink Floyd....ect. Most clubs around here cater to the young crowd and there
are plenty with DJ's. Glenwood South and the Warehouse district are full of
them and there all packed, especially on the weekends.

Last edited by carolinadreamin'; 07-08-2007 at 07:35 AM..
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,286,310 times
Reputation: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
What are you talking about? Were you sober?
It was a joke. I like Pittsburgh, but it does not exude economic vibrance and would not move there for private sector work. It's been in decline for so many years that you don't even think about it anymore, but people still go to visit, because they have kept up their attraction to tourists.
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,286,310 times
Reputation: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Correction...you'd have to get on I-74E from Bloomington to Indianapolis, then take I-465 south to get on I-70 to go to Dayton
You don't even have to stop in Champaign on your way through. I know I wouldn't! oops, but I did. Drat. Now I'm parked here for a few years.

I-39 from Bloomington to Madison is a straight shot ... a really nice stretch of road. Don't go through Chicago if you don't have to do so. It will tire you on a long drive.
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Old 07-09-2007, 12:24 PM
 
6,563 posts, read 13,774,697 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicolepsy View Post
do not choose cincinnati or louisville as they are way too similar to dayton.
Can't disagree more. Louisville is bigger than Dayton and Cincinnati is SUBSTANTIALLY bigger. There is more nice restaurants and fine dining in one neighborhood of Louisville or Cincy than all of metro Dayton. There are more young professionals in those cities and much more active downtowns, especially in Louisville. For someone who does not want a big city but just a "bigger" one, Louisville and Cincinnati would be fine choices, along with KC.

For Louisville, there are some amazing things going on. Here are some of the cooler projects underway downtown alone:

Museum Plaza - Creating A Place In Louisville's Architectural Character.

RiverPark Louisville Kentucky, Lofts and Luxury Condos

Louisville Arena Authority

Iron Quarter | Louisville, KY

The Highlands (Louisville) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Highlands is a substantially larger, more professional, upscale, Oregon District. There is just a lot mroe to do, and an increasing number of young profesionals in Crescent Hill and St Matthews as well. I speak about Louisville because I know it best, so if you have any questions, send them my way.
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Old 07-09-2007, 03:01 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,915,658 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
Can't disagree more. Louisville is bigger than Dayton and Cincinnati is SUBSTANTIALLY bigger. There is more nice restaurants and fine dining in one neighborhood of Louisville or Cincy than all of metro Dayton. There are more young professionals in those cities and much more active downtowns, especially in Louisville. For someone who does not want a big city but just a "bigger" one, Louisville and Cincinnati would be fine choices, along with KC.

For Louisville, there are some amazing things going on. Here are some of the cooler projects underway downtown alone:

Museum Plaza - Creating A Place In Louisville's Architectural Character.

RiverPark Louisville Kentucky, Lofts and Luxury Condos

Louisville Arena Authority

Iron Quarter | Louisville, KY

The Highlands (Louisville) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Highlands is a substantially larger, more professional, upscale, Oregon District. There is just a lot mroe to do, and an increasing number of young profesionals in Crescent Hill and St Matthews as well. I speak about Louisville because I know it best, so if you have any questions, send them my way.
In addition, Louisville is culturally a Southern city unlike the rest of the cities listed, which are culturally Midwestern like Dayton. While temperature-wise it is not much better than the Lower Midwest, it gets noticeably less snow although temperature-wise it's around the same. So it's weather is overall slightly better than the other Lower Midwestern cities. I guess if you want a change in culture and different type of atmosphere and attitude, Louisville would be your best choice as technically it is not a Midwestern city.
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Old 07-09-2007, 08:06 PM
 
6,563 posts, read 13,774,697 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
In addition, Louisville is culturally a Southern city unlike the rest of the cities listed, which are culturally Midwestern like Dayton. While temperature-wise it is not much better than the Lower Midwest, it gets noticeably less snow although temperature-wise it's around the same. So it's weather is overall slightly better than the other Lower Midwestern cities. I guess if you want a change in culture and different type of atmosphere and attitude, Louisville would be your best choice as technically it is not a Midwestern city.
True....but Louisville is no Nashville. It has southern elements, but it is comfortable to many Midwesterners. It has a very Midwest look and feel to it, but yes there is a distinct southern culture, although nowhere near somewhere like Nashville, Charlotte, or other midsized southern metros doing well.
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