U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-07-2007, 10:15 AM
 
151 posts, read 658,946 times
Reputation: 87

Advertisements

I'm just wondering what things the Northeast and South have in common that the Midwest doesn't have, there are many things that Northeast and Midwest have in common.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-07-2007, 10:41 AM
 
333 posts, read 1,331,735 times
Reputation: 88
better winters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Warwick
100 posts, read 425,427 times
Reputation: 61
decent seafood..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 11:08 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,900,535 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2NYC? View Post
better winters.
Better winters? I beg to differ. Upstate New York, Massachusetts, VErmont, Maine...you call those better winters than the Midwest? Also, the other thing that the Northeast and South have are that their dialect is closely related to a form of British dialect. Both the Northeast and South have a lot of English ancestry. They also both existed before the Midwest ever did. The Northeast and South speak with heavier accents than the Midwest generally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,389,357 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2NYC? View Post
better winters.
Hardly.

The tradeoff? We get better summers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 11:57 AM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,755,794 times
Reputation: 828
Colonial history for one. Also, cities developed differently. The Northeast and South have some big cities, but there are many more medium-sized towns inbetween them. Southern cities, however, developed later than did the north and they sprawl more. Savannah, Mobile and Charleston SHOULD (as far as history goes) be bigger than Atlanta and Charlotte. This is much more European than the Midwest. Up here, we have cities with huge hinterlands wherein you would be hardstruck to find a city with more than 100,000 people. For instance, Minneapolis' realm of "control" extends from the UP of Mich. to the Dakotas and Montana. Think of the largest city in the Dakotas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 12:35 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Better winters? I beg to differ. Upstate New York, Massachusetts, VErmont, Maine...you call those better winters than the Midwest? Also, the other thing that the Northeast and South have are that their dialect is closely related to a form of British dialect. Both the Northeast and South have a lot of English ancestry. They also both existed before the Midwest ever did. The Northeast and South speak with heavier accents than the Midwest generally.
Except for Maine, I would say the winters in the NE are "better" than the winters in the upper midwest. Some of the midwestern accents drive me crazy, so nasally and whiny sounding.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,122,019 times
Reputation: 698
Frankly, I think the South has a lot more in common with the Midwest. Both tend to be more rural and laid back and have a lot more agriculture. There's also more warmth and next door neighbor like qualities. As a Virginian, I would feel more at home with someone from Kansas than I would someone from Connetticut or New Jersey.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 05:11 PM
 
333 posts, read 1,331,735 times
Reputation: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Except for Maine, I would say the winters in the NE are "better" than the winters in the upper midwest.
and i'd agree.

but don't take our word for it:

MONEY Magazine: Best places to live 2006: Top 25 Coldest
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 05:59 PM
 
2,133 posts, read 5,251,940 times
Reputation: 1398
The only thing I can think of that the NE and the SE have in common would be the same names on the mail boxes. NE in the summer; SE in the winter.

As for the NE and the midwest...except for snow, I can't think of a thing the two have in common. Give me the northeast everytime.

Maine has very mild winters now, certainly compared to how they were when I was a child back in the 60's and early 70's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top