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Old 07-07-2007, 09:39 PM
 
Location: IN
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Overland Park Kansas; otherwise known as "Corporate" Park, is a suburb of Kansas City with many taller office buildings that are often located in office "parks."
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Old 07-07-2007, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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The Denver tech center in south Denver/ Greenwood Village has a lot of tall office buildings, even some new high rise condos going up. They are sleek looking and state of the art. From a distance, like on the other side of the state park, it actually forms a skyline of its own. I actually like it better than downtown Denver itself.
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Old 07-08-2007, 12:19 AM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
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I'm too lazy to find pictures online but two of the suburbs with the most impressive skylines I've seen are Clayton, Missouri (St. Louis burb) and Bellevue, Washington (Seattle burb).

The cities of Jersey City and Newark have decent skylines but I'm not sure if they're considered by many people to be suburbs since they seem to be vibrant and sustainable cities in their own rights, albeit ones within a few miles of New York.

Some of suburban South Florida has impressively tall buildings, generally condos lining the beach. There's also a smattering of high-rises concentrated in Dunwoody, Georgia outside of Atlanta.
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Old 07-08-2007, 09:25 AM
 
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Southfield and Troy Michigan, both suburbs of Detroit have tall buildings, they were built to replace Detroit's downtown which was in ruins.
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Old 07-08-2007, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Bellevue (outside of Seattle), Tysons Corner, Schaumburg, and Southfield and Troy (both in Michigan, north of Detroit) certainly qualify. The closest thing that Cleveland has is Beachwood/Mayfield, but it's not notable in the sense of Schaumburg or Southfield.

Does Clayton, Missouri exhibit the attribute of discussion? The photos on C-D appear to be office towers.
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:46 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M TYPE X View Post
Bellevue (outside of Seattle), Tysons Corner, Schaumburg, and Southfield and Troy (both in Michigan, north of Detroit) certainly qualify. The closest thing that Cleveland has is Beachwood/Mayfield, but it's not notable in the sense of Schaumburg or Southfield.

Does Clayton, Missouri exhibit the attribute of discussion? The photos on C-D appear to be office towers.
Ummm...Clayton, Missouri dwarfs anything Cleveland has outside of its downtown and is one of the largest suburban skylines in the United States. It is not only known as St. Louis' second downtown, it also has about 16,000 people living in its suburbs. And this is just a tiny patch of St. Louis County. It is essentially the county seat of St. Louis County. So yes. It exhibits the attributes of discussion. You won't find many suburban skylines like Clayton in the United States, trust me. I grew up in Clayton and loved every second of it. Awesome to wake up to a large skyline. Downtown Clayton is about as large as Downtown Akron now. It has tall residential apartments in addition to its tall office towers. Some of them are over or about 100 meters tall. Downtown Clayton has been getting new buildings every year and is starting to become a major downtown.
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:52 PM
 
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"The cities of Jersey City and Newark have decent skylines but I'm not sure if they're considered by many people to be suburbs since they seem to be vibrant and sustainable cities in their own rights, albeit ones within a few miles of New York"

That's right, Jersey City and Newark are no more suburbs of NYC than Minneapolis is a suburb of St. Paul.
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:55 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
"The cities of Jersey City and Newark have decent skylines but I'm not sure if they're considered by many people to be suburbs since they seem to be vibrant and sustainable cities in their own rights, albeit ones within a few miles of New York"

That's right, Jersey City and Newark are no more suburbs of NYC than Minneapolis is a suburb of St. Paul.
Minneapolis a suburb of St. Paul? I always thought it was talked about the other way around
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Old 07-09-2007, 10:47 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
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Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Minneapolis a suburb of St. Paul? I always thought it was talked about the other way around
Not by me!

Actually, my point is that Mpls, St Paul, Newark, Jersey City and NYC are all cities in their own rights, with their own economic and social histories, none are suburbs (i.e., an offshoot of another city.) Though they are closely situated, they all developed independently of one another.

In your area, a strong case could be made that East St Louis is not a suburb. There are other Mississippi River towns with the same dynamic: Davenport, Rock Island, Moline, and eastern cities like Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, New Bedford, Fall River, Norfolk, Portsmouth to name a few.

Last edited by Ben Around; 07-09-2007 at 10:55 AM..
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Old 07-09-2007, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
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Yeah I wouldn't call Newark and Jersey City "suburbs," because they are probably more "urban" than most central cities throughout the country (if you consider population density an indicator). I've heard the term "urburb" used to describe these urban satellites.

All the same, there are 20-30 story buildings in many of the suburban areas around NYC. Places like White Plains, New Brunswick, and Stamford come to mind, although they're borderline urburbs themselves. There are office parks and apartments/condos throughout the Meadowlands, Metropark, The Palisades, along the parkways, and out on The Island that probably look more like what the OP is getting at.
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