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Old 06-07-2011, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,528 posts, read 5,715,838 times
Reputation: 640

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Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
I do not like malls. The stores are usually filled with cheaply made clothing that everybody wears. At smaller boutiques, I can get clothing that is better made that is more "exclusive" in that it does not have the production levels as places like the gap or banana republic. Also, in a downtown area, I can pick to eat at a variety of unique places ranging from street vendors to high end food. Malls do not offer that. Not to mention being around an atmosphere with cool architecture.
1) You obviously know nothing of the clothing industry. Your comment is elitist. I'm glad you have the money to go blow on some small boutique which imports things from China just like the mall does (which does have High quality things). And having someone make your dress doesn't count, because I highly doubt your wardrobe is filled with custom-made clothes. Your comment is not only elitist but also ignorant.

2) The mall doesn't?... I've been to malls where you can buy a pretzel for a buck and a $100 plate 200 feet away. Litterally, people actually GO TO THE MALL for the HIGH END restaurant.

3) I'll give you that... tee hee.

It's not that I LOVE malls, but many people are unfairly "hating on" malls. Yeah... they're ugly and suburban. That's the only real thing I dislike.
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Old 06-08-2011, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,183 posts, read 21,034,786 times
Reputation: 4263
I like both and think if a city does it right it can have a thriving mall and downtown shopping area.
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Old 06-08-2011, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,305 posts, read 1,256,634 times
Reputation: 1427
If the malls can be incorporated into the downtown through public transit, parking lots and large population density, they can help make an area more vibrant. Prudential Center Mall in Boston is a good example. There's a "T" stop on one end of the mall, and shops outside. Maybe a few too many chains and a bit upscale, it still helps to keep the neighborhood vibrant. Plus, it doesn't take away from the major outdoor shopping districts like Downtown Crossing and Quincy Market.

On the other hand, I see how both strip malls and large shopping malls in both Burlington, MA and Nashua, NH have killed any chances Lowell has of ever having a decent downtown. Same comparisons can be made with Hartford, New Haven and Bridgeport, CT.
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Old 06-08-2011, 04:01 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,897,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bolehboleh View Post
If the malls can be incorporated into the downtown through public transit, parking lots and large population density, they can help make an area more vibrant. Prudential Center Mall in Boston is a good example. There's a "T" stop on one end of the mall, and shops outside. Maybe a few too many chains and a bit upscale, it still helps to keep the neighborhood vibrant. Plus, it doesn't take away from the major outdoor shopping districts like Downtown Crossing and Quincy Market.

On the other hand, I see how both strip malls and large shopping malls in both Burlington, MA and Nashua, NH have killed any chances Lowell has of ever having a decent downtown. Same comparisons can be made with Hartford, New Haven and Bridgeport, CT.
I agree public transportation for a mall in downtown helps.

The lifestyle center in our downtown is right next to a bus stop. And is a main stopping point in the city.
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Old 06-09-2011, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
915 posts, read 1,497,526 times
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There are a lot of malls in walkable and transit-accessible areas. Westfield San Francisco Centre is probably the most popular of these. Other notable examples include Westfield Downtown Plaza in Sacramento, the Westlake Center in Seattle, Manhattan Mall in Manhattan, The Gallery at Market East in Philadelphia, and all of the vertical malls along Michigan Avenue in Chicago. In the DC and Toronto areas there are areas that are otherwise not walkable, but contain a mall adjacent to a transit station; notable examples of these include the Yorkdale Center and Scarborough Town Centre in GTA, and Westfield Wheaton Mall and Fashion Centre at Pentagon City in the DC metro area.
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Old 06-09-2011, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
420 posts, read 675,416 times
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How about a thriving Mall downtown?

Last edited by JMT; 06-13-2011 at 11:16 AM.. Reason: Removed copyrighted image
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:37 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,972,432 times
Reputation: 14673
The big difference between downtown and the mall is that Yung Joc never told anybody to meet him downtown.
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Old 06-13-2011, 06:30 AM
 
21,202 posts, read 30,404,475 times
Reputation: 19645
Quote:
Originally Posted by durf View Post
The main shopping area in Philly is King of Prussia, while many Dt Philly/Center City stores on Chestnut and Walnut Streets have closed. Check out the Liberty tower galleria on Chestnut/Market. Alot of stores have closed. The mall is struggling. I'm not talking about the Galleria on E. Market St. That's a black eye on Philly. The suburban malls have hurt the city proper since most of the upscale stores are not even in the city. That's ashame. I was disappointed.

When Center City is mostly restaurants and some bars with mediocre shopping, that's not a downtown. That's a office park with revelers roaming the town. The historical attractions help Philly tourism, and that is its saving grace.
I actually used to be the manager of a store in the Shops at Liberty Place which you refer to. My store was closed by the company due to "under-performing" in July 2009. Currently 3/4 of the usable retail space is now empty due primarily to large firms bailing out of the buildings above the mall to new properties in University City and Society Hill. The demographics have unfortunately changed in downtown Philly (Center City). It used to feature an upscale demographic that would actually shop but now has been for whatever reason replaced by a more downmarket clientele that is comfortable with shopping the "black eye" on Market Street, The Gallery and the "urban stores" along Market Street. Walnut Street is the only venue remaining for upscale shopping and it too is riddled with vacancies and stores content to maintain a zero or low profit margin for a presence there. It's fascinating that a city the size of Philadelphia can't support a more vibrant shopping scene and that residents seem content with 30 minute or more drives (if in fact as a city dweller one has a car) to either King of Prussia or Cherry Hill Mall. In my opinion one can't crow about a downtown renaissance as Philly has with such a sad state of affairs for the retail sector.
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Old 06-13-2011, 11:37 AM
 
Location: The City
22,339 posts, read 32,182,008 times
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Will see if any the Market East plans come to fruition but at least there are funds secured to rehab the gallery and open the stores up to street level.

http://www.centercityphila.org/docs/...EastMarket.pdf
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Old 06-13-2011, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,865 posts, read 7,811,377 times
Reputation: 9492
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It's fascinating that a city the size of Philadelphia can't support a more vibrant shopping scene and that residents seem content with 30 minute or more drives (if in fact as a city dweller one has a car) to either King of Prussia or Cherry Hill Mall. In my opinion one can't crow about a downtown renaissance as Philly has with such a sad state of affairs for the retail sector.
Just returned from some errands:
shops on chestnut street philadelphia - Google Maps

Yea, it's a ghost town out there.
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