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Old 11-17-2010, 10:24 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,906,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
I dislike Malls myself and prefer downtowns/center cities. The OP should have added a poll!
Lol I think we know that city data is usually against the mall. I am glad people at least prefer malls over strip malls. I will ALWAYS love the mall. It is something I wasn't raised with and wish that I was. Most urban centers or major cities/towns have one. My area has an outlet mall, but those are tourist orientated and you can't really get the community gathering feel there. My area used to have a mall. They also are trying to build an open-air mall in San Luis Obispo on Dalidio Ranch. Due to bad economic times and so much of the clothing stores have located downtown the poor man can not develop his land now.

Most downtowns I see these days have higher-end retail stores, cafes, coffee shops, ethnic restaurants, and high-end shops period.

Malls have more middle-class clothing stores and other speciality stores. Since open-air malls were orientated that way. Open-air malls are leaning to more mid-upper middle class end.

And another problem with malls is that if the dynamics of a city change like they have a shift of demographics to a "certain" race, then you will see the stores in a middle class mall go down to being all locally owned un-interesting stores. Look at the Santa Maria Town Center Mall or County Fair Mall in Woodland. County Fair Mall does not even have a website anymore.

I like the suburbs and the strip mall and open-air/enclosed mall feel. I think most areas have a mall or at least an outlet mall.

The cities with high-end stores in their downtowns are very few. San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, and Berkeley are some that come to mind.
Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I don't like malls. I sometimes go to them, and I find them kind of interesting at times, but I much, much, much prefer to do my shopping in a "real" shopping district. I don't like that almost all malls are so auto-oriented, even the ones that have decent public transportation and walking connections. (and yes, there are the downtown malls, but in that case why bother?) I don't like that, for the most part, mall stores are dominated by national chains. I don't like that malls are so artificial in feeling; I think that saps some of the vitality that you find on a more traditional outside downtown or commercial district street. In malls most of the businesses are retail, with a few services or food options thrown in; in a downtown or neighborhood commercial district you're more likely to get a broader mix of uses in the same area. And while I agree that malls get a good mix of people, I still generally think the street life is more interesting and the people watching better in a more traditional shopping street. I do sometimes enjoy going to malls because they are such a part of American life (although I've been to malls in other countries, too), but since in general I try to spend my money at locally-owned, non-chain stores, malls just don't have as much to offer me.

I live in Minnesota, birthplace of Southdale, the first enclosed American mall, and it wasn't always that way. Even when I was a kid Southdale actually felt more like a true community gathering place. Steadily over the years the more public gathering places were eliminated and filled in with kiosks, while the benches reduced in number or made less pleasant. There even used to be a grocery store there -- long gone. Most malls don't seem to have much of a feeling of connection to the community, or a sense of place; you can set foot in malls in one city or town and it usually doesn't have anything so memorable to distinguish it from a mall in another town or region.

I would take a mall any day over a strip mall, though. I dislike malls, but I hate strip malls. They seem to be a concept designed to make shopping as unpleasant as possible. There's not even the attempts at being a (privately managed) community gathering place that there is at malls.
If you can afford to shop downtown then more power to ya. Also, you have to pay for parking in our downtown. So again, if you can afford it then more power to ya.
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Old 11-18-2010, 06:01 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
908 posts, read 1,568,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS2010 View Post
I don't know if you know this, but you don't have to be in an official shopping district in order to shop. There is shopping throughout downtown Orlando plus park ave.
So you agree with me that DT Orlando has no shopping district. So when you make statements that you prefer malls it is basically because you have no choice. And BTW Park Ave is in another town and consider a suburb and not city shopping.
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Old 11-18-2010, 06:24 AM
 
Location: GA-TX
442 posts, read 705,991 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJPhilliesPhan View Post
So you agree with me that DT Orlando has no shopping district. So when you make statements that you prefer malls it is basically because you have no choice. And BTW Park Ave is in another town and consider a suburb and not city shopping.
It has to be call a shopping district to have shopping? Sounds like semantics to me.
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Old 11-18-2010, 06:25 AM
 
Location: GA-TX
442 posts, read 705,991 times
Reputation: 217
I guess most people on city-data are well off. I and most people can't afford to shop at high end places everytime they need a new shirt.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:17 AM
 
Location: GA-TX
442 posts, read 705,991 times
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Quote:
Downtown Vs. The Mall 11-18-2010 10:12 AM True, but if you move out of the South and to the North more money would be available for you. Southern salaries are just so low.
Some one just sent ne that. I guess they don't realize the COL and taxes is also much higher up north too.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:26 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 4,999,775 times
Reputation: 1192
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJPhilliesPhan View Post
So you agree with me that DT Orlando has no shopping district. So when you make statements that you prefer malls it is basically because you have no choice. And BTW Park Ave is in another town and consider a suburb and not city shopping.
No shopping district means no shopping at all? Your anti Orlando agenda continues to perplex. How can one hate something when the reasons they hate it turn out to be lies and exaggerations? Do you secretly love Orlando?
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Orlandooooooo
2,363 posts, read 4,426,435 times
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I would choose the Mall. Living in orlando has showed me how a lack of downtown shopping can be. Thats being said I think it would be great to have shopping downtown as opposed to always having to go to the mall in one of the suburbs.
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Old 11-19-2010, 01:58 AM
 
28 posts, read 49,211 times
Reputation: 46
Default For me, Downtown > Mall > Lifestyle center

When I go on shopping trips at places like these, it becomes an all-day event. Meet up with your friends, eat out, shop, sit on a bench/hang out, shop more, eat again, etc.

Lifestyle centers revolve around the parking lot. I LOVE to "people watch". It is most annoying to people watch at Lifestyle centers / strip malls / etc because people walk by on the narrow paths /sidewalks more quickly or disappear into the parking lot. Plus, I always feel like I'm in a desert or something at a Lifestyle center when outside; it's blandsville (the colors especially) and not part of the community. The best part about Lifestyle centers is the actual stores. For my age group they are perfect (20s). But Starbucks, Barnes and Noble, and Banana Republic can be found everywhere. "Lifestyle center" is defined as upscale, so $$$ is often needed.

Once inside a Mall, it does not revolve around the parking lot. Which means you do not feel pressure to hurry up and go. And it means the setting is slightly more intimate. People watching is better here since the floors are wide and benches are everywhere. My friends and I have met a lot of people through the mall in every imaginable way. Prices at middle class malls are low. However, malls don't offer me as many stores as they used to since I am not a teen anymore, and many malls are tween-dominated or hood (but not all).

I like Downtown shopping the most. Uniquely designed. Independent stores. Stores for all ages. Walkable (usually) to and from and to even more activities around town. Exciting community atmosphere. Tons of people watching opportunities. More diverse and trendy people, than the pants-on-the-ground or cargo shorts/jean skirt suburbanites. Minus the kids everywhere. Downside is the shops are often expensive(!) compared to most Malls. Be careful where you wander off to in a city. Though that shouldn't be an issue with sites like this and an observant eye.


People who want to get all shopping done with quickly will have drastically different outlooks. Oddly enough I think Lifestyle centers are best for people who want to get in and get out.
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Old 11-19-2010, 08:10 AM
 
21,228 posts, read 30,461,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
A "non-pedestrian indoor center"?

How do you get around in malls? Scooter? Trolley? Skateboard?

Stroller?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sk8t View Post
So, how do you get around? I don't get it?

The point being that regional malls are destinations...usually with multi-lane highways converging, massive sprawl surrounding them, enormous parking lots and long walks across asphalt to get in or out of them. Lifestyle Centers have smaller footprints. They don't cover as much acreage and getting to/from stores typically doesn't take as long. Lifestyle centers are typically closer to population centers and not a catalyst for more suburban sprawl. When one walks from store to store in a Lifestyle Center, one walks outside on nice sidewalks with landscaping and fresh air. There is also less congestion typically and once can easily cut through to go to a desired store versus weaving through lumbering packs of people to reach them. I'm happy for those that love the culture of a regional mall, but there are many who do not. For many, the Lifestyle Center is a more attractive option and one that will continue to increase in popularity due to economics for the builders and more attractive store selection for the consumer.
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Old 11-19-2010, 08:13 AM
 
21,228 posts, read 30,461,228 times
Reputation: 19701
Quote:
Originally Posted by sk8t View Post
I guess most people on city-data are well off. I and most people can't afford to shop at high end places everytime they need a new shirt.
You should probably expand your horizons. "High end places" run sales, pretty much consistently these days. I can do as well at Banana Republic or JCrew price wise than I can at TjMaxx or Marshall's, and buy something of much better quality that's actually in-style.
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