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Old 11-19-2010, 10:54 AM
 
Location: DC
529 posts, read 1,023,253 times
Reputation: 293

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reading the title of this thread made me think it was about DC's downtown vs. the National Mall! maybe talking about how the mall is technically downtown, but the urban part of downtown is a few blocks to the north and how that affects the liveliness of the city, or what section "defines" the city....that would make for an interesting thread!
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Old 11-19-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: GA-TX
442 posts, read 704,981 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
You should probably expand your horizons. "High end places" run sales, pretty much consistently these days. I can do as well at Banana Republic or JCrew price wise than I can at TjMaxx or Marshall's, and buy something of much better quality that's actually in-style.
Banana Republic is high end? What malls have TJMaxx and Marshalls inside them?
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Old 11-19-2010, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,378 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54025
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
The point being that regional malls are destinations...usually with multi-lane highways converging, massive sprawl surrounding them, enormous parking lots and long walks across asphalt to get in or out of them. Lifestyle Centers have smaller footprints. They don't cover as much acreage and getting to/from stores typically doesn't take as long. Lifestyle centers are typically closer to population centers and not a catalyst for more suburban sprawl.
You're still not getting it. Lifestyle centers are nothing more than outdoor malls -- with streets running between the stores instead of indoor concourses. They may have smaller footprint than malls, but they still have enormous parking lots or garages.

Also, they're being built in cornfields near major highways -- some even farther out from population centers than the existing malls.

And those existing malls? Half-empty, deteriorating, and bulldozed ... What a waste of resources all because retailers think shoppers want to have the latest bright shiny thing.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:14 PM
 
404 posts, read 951,187 times
Reputation: 361
Check out Charlottesville, VA. Their response to the centralized shopping mall was to brick over main street and turn it into a European style pedestrian mall. It took a while to warm over the populace (many of whom considered it to kill the main street businesses that relied on auto traffic, and an obstruction to the normal flow of downtown), but it has become an integral part of Charlottesville's unique vibe and one of its biggest assets. Granted, only yuppie type places exist (stupid art boutiques, cleverly named bars, etc), but the rival shopping mall never advanced beyond the early 1980s phase. In terms of shopping Malls, Charlottesville's is woefully inadequate compared to cities of similar sizes, and I think it may have something to do with the lack of demand for anything to replace it...
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Old 11-21-2010, 06:52 AM
 
21,195 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You're still not getting it. Lifestyle centers are nothing more than outdoor malls -- with streets running between the stores instead of indoor concourses. They may have smaller footprint than malls, but they still have enormous parking lots or garages.

Also, they're being built in cornfields near major highways -- some even farther out from population centers than the existing malls.

And those existing malls? Half-empty, deteriorating, and bulldozed ... What a waste of resources all because retailers think shoppers want to have the latest bright shiny thing.
A real Lifestyle Center doesn't have streets running through the center of it. That's a "strip center". An actual Lifestyle Center is built like an "island" with parking lots surrounding the stores and pedestrian thoroughfares through the center and of course along the frontage. The concept design is focused on pedestrian-friendly access versus a sea of asphalt. It makes people get out and walk, interact and slow down a bit, versus competitive driving competitions to get to the nearest entrance. Of course they're being built near highways, how else would they be accessed? And actually yes they're being built near population centers (not in cornfields unless it happens to the closest available land to a population center) as they rely on nearby resident traffic since they don't have the pull of a regional mall. It's common sense demographic planning. I'm guessing given your lack of knowledge on the subject you're a knee-jerk NIMBY, otherwise you'd get it.
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Old 11-21-2010, 06:57 AM
 
21,195 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by sk8t View Post
Banana Republic is high end? What malls have TJMaxx and Marshalls inside them?
Yes, Banana Republic is "high end". Not every mall has one. Please reread my initial post, I never mentioned TJMaxx or Marshalls being inside a mall. Does anyone else on this thread possess reading comprehension?
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Old 11-21-2010, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Area, Michigan
1,107 posts, read 2,707,950 times
Reputation: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
A real Lifestyle Center doesn't have streets running through the center of it. That's a "strip center". An actual Lifestyle Center is built like an "island" with parking lots surrounding the stores and pedestrian thoroughfares through the center and of course along the frontage. The concept design is focused on pedestrian-friendly access versus a sea of asphalt. It makes people get out and walk, interact and slow down a bit, versus competitive driving competitions to get to the nearest entrance. Of course they're being built near highways, how else would they be accessed? And actually yes they're being built near population centers (not in cornfields unless it happens to the closest available land to a population center) as they rely on nearby resident traffic since they don't have the pull of a regional mall. It's common sense demographic planning. I'm guessing given your lack of knowledge on the subject you're a knee-jerk NIMBY, otherwise you'd get it.

rochester hills - Google Maps
The Village of Rochester Hills - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Macomb, mi - Google Maps
The Mall at Partridge Creek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

All looks the same too me.
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Old 11-21-2010, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Northside Of Jacksonville
3,288 posts, read 6,108,569 times
Reputation: 3375
Lifestyle centers are basically outside malls, there's really no difference between the two. You can find the same in a mall as you can at a lifestyle center aka outside mall. I'll go to the mall twice a year, if that because there's a lifestyle center in close proximity to my home so I go there instead. Prior to its construction I'd have to drive across the city to go to the mall, which ate up gas.
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Old 11-22-2010, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,378 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54025
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
A real Lifestyle Center doesn't have streets running through the center of it. That's a "strip center".
Welcome to Easton Town Center in Columbus, Ohio

http://www.thegreene.com/DirectoryMap.aspx

Providence Town Center | Directory

Three cornfield lifestyle centers, three lifestyle centers with streets running through them -- streets that weren't there before the development was built, three regional shopping destinations. Whaddaya know about that.

Quote:
I'm guessing given your lack of knowledge on the subject you're a knee-jerk NIMBY, otherwise you'd get it.
And I'm guessing you don't get out much. Also, I'm guessing your head is stuck in the sand if you can't acknowledge that not all lifestyle centers are built the same way.
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:18 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
908 posts, read 1,566,995 times
Reputation: 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAm_FloridaBorn View Post
I would choose the Mall. Living in orlando has showed me how a lack of downtown shopping can be. Thats being said I think it would be great to have shopping downtown as opposed to always having to go to the mall in one of the suburbs.
That is horrible to not have to option to shop in your downtown.
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