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Old 11-22-2010, 05:03 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Especially North/South, but also smaller regional identities like New England, Appalachian, Gulf country, Californian. Big indicators include the dialect/accent, local culinary tradition, musical tradition, folk tradition. Within the States I think the coalescence of the region probably reached a critical diversity in the early to mid 20th Century: perhaps the 1940s or 1950s. After which, globalization took over. Before which, America was still a culturally new nation, and was more compressed.
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Old 11-22-2010, 06:33 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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I suppose 1783-1788 as it was after Britain acknowledged our independence, but before the Articles of Confederation were replaced by the US Constitution.

If you want to speak of the period when the US had its present boundaries maybe regional differences were most pronounced from 1899 to 1912. By 1899 I think we had most of what now makes up US territory, Hawaii and Puerto Rico were colonies although we did not yet have the Virgin Islands and American Samoa was just ours on paper, but commercial radio was apparently not too widespread by 1912 and the anti-German effects of US entry in WWI had not yet occurred. Also Wilson's election, and it reconciling the South a bit, did not occur until the end of 1912. Besides that it doesn't look like radio was that widespread in 1912. Also interesting is that in the early portion of this period Geronimo and Chief Joseph were still alive. American Indians had been "conquered", therefore part of the US, but it was recent enough of a conquest many of them likely retained more of their old customs than they do now.
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Old 11-22-2010, 06:42 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I suppose 1783-1788 as it was after Britain acknowledged our independence, but before the Articles of Confederation were replaced by the US Constitution.

If you want to speak of the period when the US had its present boundaries maybe regional differences were most pronounced from 1899 to 1912. By 1899 I think we had most of what now makes up US territory, Hawaii and Puerto Rico were colonies although we did not yet have the Virgin Islands and American Samoa was just ours on paper, but commercial radio was apparently not too widespread by 1912 and the anti-German effects of US entry in WWI had not yet occurred. Also Wilson's election, and it reconciling the South a bit, did not occur until the end of 1912. Besides that it doesn't look like radio was that widespread in 1912. Also interesting is that in the early portion of this period Geronimo and Chief Joseph were still alive. American Indians had been "conquered", therefore part of the US, but it was recent enough of a conquest many of them likely retained more of their old customs than they do now.
Was there any southern culture back in 1788 though?
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: The City
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I would probably say leading up to the Civil war - today the differances are becoming less and less pronounced every year
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:44 AM
 
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Yes, there definitely was a "southern culture" in the 18th century, or at least very pronounced differences between regions. New England and the Southern states had very distinct cultural differences. Not to mention other areas of the country (or what would become the country eventually, in some cases).
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:51 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Yes. Elements of Southern culture dates to about the 1690s or earlier. The College of William and Mary goes back to 1693, a member of the Lee family (Robert E. Lee's people) was in Virginia's House of Burgess by the 1640s, by 1670 the House of Burgess had at least one Cavalier/Royalist as member (George Mason the First), and in the 1690s "miscegenation" started being outlawed in some Southern colonies. In the 1770s Charleston was one of the largest ports in the colonies and the Scots-Irish had arrived in some number.

Note: I had not seen the post above when I typed.
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