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Old 11-24-2010, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,609,319 times
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When most people hear the word 'suburb', they think spacious homes, malls, good schools, and low crime.

Thats not the case for a good amount of the Detroit Metro Area, anymore, and probably for many other metro areas throughout the country. Some are stereotypical suburbs with qualities I listed below, however.

Recently, I made a series of trips to one of the 'less desirable' suburbs. This always wasn't the case. Not very long ago, this was a prosperous, but relatively blue collar, city. It had an economy based on manufacturing, with some areas of the city being dominated by light industrial buildings. Years of gradual decline, both population and job-wise, have led to what you're about to see.

I drove around the city for a little while, before my camera died on me. But, I managed to get the best of the best, and I'll try to go back for more. Keep in mind, this is not a big city. Its a suburb.

Just to show how hard some cities have been hit by the recession.
Oh, and to be fair, I've mixed some of the nicer homes of the city.

















































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Old 11-24-2010, 07:34 PM
 
1,728 posts, read 4,138,247 times
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Same with parts of suburban Chicago. Chicago has regional cities like Waukegan, Elgin, Aurora, and Joliet. All have around 100K population, with Aurora at about 140K. For the most part, these suburbs are somewhat depressed.

A whole swath of the near south suburbs of the city also is quite impoverished.
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Old 11-24-2010, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Murika
2,526 posts, read 2,608,055 times
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You know, it's quite a sobering sight. I have no idea how it is where others live, but I currently (and temporarily) reside in South Beach Miami and here, you wouldn't know that there is a recession. People seems to throw money around as though they have their own printing presses at home.

For a while now, my experience here has been in complete contrast to what is said on the news. Don't get me wrong, I know that there are problems all around me, but if you mainly stay within a given area, you have no idea just how severe it can be.
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Old 11-24-2010, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,609,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chitown85 View Post
Same with parts of suburban Chicago. Chicago has regional cities like Waukegan, Elgin, Aurora, and Joliet. All have around 100K population, with Aurora at about 140K. For the most part, these suburbs are somewhat depressed.

A whole swath of the near south suburbs of the city also is quite impoverished.
Thanks for that information. But, the thing is, those suburbs are quite large. These pictures were taken all in the same city, with a population of about 16-18k. other. So, there is a bit of a difference.

Last edited by Remisc; 11-24-2010 at 11:52 PM..
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Old 11-25-2010, 07:24 AM
 
56,995 posts, read 81,385,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
Thanks for that information. But, the thing is, those suburbs are quite large. These pictures were taken all in the same city, with a population of about 16-18k. other. So, there is a bit of a difference.
Good point, as those suburban cities listed near Chicago could be cities that are the center of their own metro if they weren't close to Chicago. So, you can see why they vary in terms of neighborhoods.

You can see similar situations in other metros across the country too.
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Old 11-25-2010, 07:51 AM
 
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Look at Dolton, Dixmoor, and Robbins in the south suburbs of Chicagoland.
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Old 11-25-2010, 11:58 AM
 
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I do not think it is just the Mid-West. For example, here in New Jersey there are some really crumby suburban communities. Though it is usually our smaller sized cities that are the hotbeds of deterioration, some of that decay has spread to suburban communities as well. Just outside our largest city of Newark, we have East Orange, Orange and Irvington. These used to be prosperous suburban communities that people fled to when Newark first declined. Now, they off-limits to outsiders. Also, Plainfield can also be described as a suburb rather than a minor city and has declined a lot in recent years. Otherwise, the communities just outside the crime-infested smaller NJ cities are usually OK, though noticeably more blue-collar than in years past. Outside of Paterson, we have Haledon. Haledon is a noticeably working class suburb that is not as nice as the affluent exosuburbs. On the other hand, it is still a safe place to walk around and raise a family. Here in NJ you have to go at least two towns outside our cities to find the really nice and proserpous "exosuburbs" that are idealized so much.

"Exosuburbs" are suburbs further out from the main urban core, opposed to inner-ring suburbs which are the next town over. I am sure that people will see this all over the country. The inner-ring suburbs are often extensions of the urban core, whether it is good or not so good. The exosuburbs are usually more desirable and a safe distance from the urban problems of our cities.

Is it safe to assume that the OP has visited "inner-ring" suburbs? Though I am sure there are exceptions to this rule.
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Old 11-25-2010, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
4,196 posts, read 5,267,958 times
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I hear ya, there are houses within walking distance of me that have been vacent for years, have fallen into disrepair and a few new homes that the builders Just quit building. They now sit in overgrown lots one is what would have been a beautifull corner house.. With the mold and everything else I cant see it being livable.. It's a shame.
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Old 11-25-2010, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,609,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
Is it safe to assume that the OP has visited "inner-ring" suburbs? Though I am sure there are exceptions to this rule.
Actually, Mount Clemens, which is the city where I took all of these pictures, is 11 miles north of Detroit. Its an outer-ring suburb, but it appears to be a run-down inner city in many areas.
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Old 11-26-2010, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,818,849 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
When most people hear the word 'suburb', they think spacious homes, malls, good schools, and low crime.

Thats not the case for a good amount of the Detroit Metro Area, anymore, and probably for many other metro areas throughout the country. Some are stereotypical suburbs with qualities I listed below, however.

Recently, I made a series of trips to one of the 'less desirable' suburbs. This always wasn't the case. Not very long ago, this was a prosperous, but relatively blue collar, city. It had an economy based on manufacturing, with some areas of the city being dominated by light industrial buildings. Years of gradual decline, both population and job-wise, have led to what you're about to see.

I drove around the city for a little while, before my camera died on me. But, I managed to get the best of the best, and I'll try to go back for more. Keep in mind, this is not a big city. Its a suburb.

Just to show how hard some cities have been hit by the recession.
Oh, and to be fair, I've mixed some of the nicer homes of the city.

















































FINALLY! I'm not trying to be negative but this shows that Detroit's Metro is not some paradise like most of the people on this site makes it out to be. Many people love to make the city look like a hell hole and the burbs like heaven. The city isn't the only area in Metro that was negatively affected by population loss and unemployment
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