U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-25-2010, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,530,828 times
Reputation: 1440

Advertisements

A Kansas–or “Toto”–strategy would provide the economic focus or bringing the country out of the recession. Illinois teeters on the edge bankruptcy, but Kansas and most Plains states remain fiscally healthy states. Although hardly a high flier, Kansas’ unemployment rate — a mere 6.6% — stands well below the national average; of the ten states with the lowest unemployment rates, five are in the Plains, including Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota and the Dakotas. Over the past decade, the region between Texas and the Dakotas has created more jobs per capita than the Northeast, the West Coast, the Great Lakes or the Southeast. Kansas and the rest of Great Plains also represent the part of America best positioned to benefit from changes in the global economy. Much is made about the “new economy” based on high-end intellectual products like software and biotechnology, venture capital and tech companies. Kansas is widely seen as falling way beyond coastal states like Massachusetts, Washington and Maryland, according to a recent survey by the Kansas City-based Kaufmann Foundation.


The Toto Strategy: How Kansas Can Save Barack Obama
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-25-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: IN
21,209 posts, read 36,824,530 times
Reputation: 13759
The statement you pasted contradicts what the premise of the article stated. The knowledge based 21st century types of jobs that rely more on technology, creativity, and innovation will further concentrate in mainly coastal states while "fly over country" states will further fall behind. I grew up in Kansas and I have no interest in moving back there, not even the Kansas City metro.
Right now, I am concentrating on saving my money at my current job so I can move to a more desirable part of the country that has a greater percentage of the population with similar ideals, skills, and outlook as myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2010, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,530,828 times
Reputation: 1440
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The statement you pasted contradicts what the premise of the article stated. The knowledge based 21st century types of jobs that rely more on technology, creativity, and innovation will further concentrate in mainly coastal states while "fly over country" states will further fall behind. I grew up in Kansas and I have no interest in moving back there, not even the Kansas City metro.
Right now, I am concentrating on saving my money at my current job so I can move to a more desirable part of the country that has a greater percentage of the population with similar ideals, skills, and outlook as myself.
I don't think you red the article don't you ?

Quote:
Kansas and the rest of Great Plains also represent the part of America best positioned to benefit from changes in the global economy. Much is made about the “new economy” based on high-end intellectual products like software and biotechnology, venture capital and tech companies. Moderator cut: remainder of copyrighted excerpt
China,India,Indonesia,Vietnam will need more and more agricultural products from the US, producted by Great Plain states.
And more high-skilled jobs will come to these states.Microsoft is in Fargo now, Utah in the West is become a great destination for California's high tech companies (at the beginning Utah was like Kansas economically no ? ).
These states have a great future.Money from Agriculture and exports products will be invested in infrastructure and diversity of jobs, as in North Dakota and Nebraska.And a wind power boom would help them more !

Last edited by Bo; 11-26-2010 at 10:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2010, 03:38 PM
 
Location: IN
21,209 posts, read 36,824,530 times
Reputation: 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
I don't think you red the article don't you ?

[/b]

China,India,Indonesia,Vietnam will need more and more agricultural products from the US, producted by Great Plain states.
And more high-skilled jobs will come to these states.Microsoft is in Fargo now, Utah in the West is become a great destination for California's high tech companies (at the beginning Utah was like Kansas economically no ? ).
These states have a great future.Money from Agriculture and exports products will be invested in infrastructure and diversity of jobs, as in North Dakota and Nebraska.And a wind power boom would help them more !


Of course those states have a core agriculture, manufacturing, and service based economy. Living in those states, however, DOES NOT APPEAL to the vast majority of younger people or single people. If you have ever lived there you would not the social culture is very strange, and having a differing opinion other than what is generally "accepted" is not looked kindly upon.

These Plains states are also benefited ENORMOUSLY by massive amounts of agriculture subsidies for commodity crop farmers. The biggest recipients of this ag welfare are those that own the largest amounts of land. Farmers with small parcels of land do not benefit from this ridiculous system, and are eventually bought out by the huge family farmers or "coporate farms."

Another big factor at play in this area is out-migration. Nearly every single rural county has lost population as no younger person with any career prospects generally stay there unless they come back to take over the family farm or ranch. Some singles or younger people move to smaller metros in the Plains while others leave entirely. Isolation, a horribly harsh climate, and an odd social culture are just a few of the many negatives of the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2010, 09:30 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,871,785 times
Reputation: 699
Here are some facts to clear up the Great Plains states situation:
1) Farming is more efficient now and prices are dropping because of it. Farms have to buy out neighboring farms and let go of workers to stay ahead of the curve.
2) These workers that are let go migrate where they may find jobs. Because these states have less large cities than a lot of states, there has been a net-outward migration (not necessarily a population decline) over the last 60 years.
3) Because these workers leave the surrounding cities lose customers. Businesses within the small communities close and lose even more people due to migration to where work is.

Good News:
1) During this time, the cities of the plains states have grown quite rapidly.
2) As these cities grow, they have learned to be competitive for jobs (to capture the rural decline).
3) While the percentage of out-migration has increased in percentage in the rural areas, it has decreased in numbers (limited amount of people remaining in small populated counties are much smaller than they use to be).
4) State population growth rates have been increasing more every decade (less out migration and more in net migration, but still an overall net out-migration).

Even Better news:
1) The plains states (and close to it) cities like Omaha/Lincoln, Kansas City, Wichita, Sioux Falls, Oklahoma City, Tulsa are all getting sizable enough to be self sustaining in high-paying jobs, entertainment, amendities, transportation etc which have seen more and more net in migration from other states than they lose to other states.
2) They have grown quite a large business luring edge over the last couple of decades which is going to serve these places well into the future.

My Final Word:
Don't expect the rural decline to stop, but don't also consider it as a bad thing either. Rural decline is a sign of present day efficiency with resources. We should be happy about it. These states are also seeing booming cities with top flight jobs and a buzzing entertainment scene. The cities in this area tend to grow above the national rate and in cases up to twice or more.

We are all doing very well overall and have some newer big cities for you all to talk about (some cases now, some in the near future).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2010, 06:07 PM
 
Location: IN
21,209 posts, read 36,824,530 times
Reputation: 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
Here are some facts to clear up the Great Plains states situation:
1) Farming is more efficient now and prices are dropping because of it. Farms have to buy out neighboring farms and let go of workers to stay ahead of the curve.
2) These workers that are let go migrate where they may find jobs. Because these states have less large cities than a lot of states, there has been a net-outward migration (not necessarily a population decline) over the last 60 years.
3) Because these workers leave the surrounding cities lose customers. Businesses within the small communities close and lose even more people due to migration to where work is.

Good News:
1) During this time, the cities of the plains states have grown quite rapidly.
2) As these cities grow, they have learned to be competitive for jobs (to capture the rural decline).
3) While the percentage of out-migration has increased in percentage in the rural areas, it has decreased in numbers (limited amount of people remaining in small populated counties are much smaller than they use to be).
4) State population growth rates have been increasing more every decade (less out migration and more in net migration, but still an overall net out-migration).

Even Better news:
1) The plains states (and close to it) cities like Omaha/Lincoln, Kansas City, Wichita, Sioux Falls, Oklahoma City, Tulsa are all getting sizable enough to be self sustaining in high-paying jobs, entertainment, amendities, transportation etc which have seen more and more net in migration from other states than they lose to other states.
2) They have grown quite a large business luring edge over the last couple of decades which is going to serve these places well into the future.

My Final Word:
Don't expect the rural decline to stop, but don't also consider it as a bad thing either. Rural decline is a sign of present day efficiency with resources. We should be happy about it. These states are also seeing booming cities with top flight jobs and a buzzing entertainment scene. The cities in this area tend to grow above the national rate and in cases up to twice or more.

We are all doing very well overall and have some newer big cities for you all to talk about (some cases now, some in the near future).

The major problem is we have only the big players left (both family and corporate farms). Both take in massive amounts of subsidies- taxpayer incurred money to support ridiculous endeavors like corn-based ethanol, completely unsustainable irrigation agriculture in semi-arid places, and dependency on corporate seed companies, fertilizer monopolies, and petrol reliance.

Only a few counties are doing well at the expense of an enormous area. That is not a good balance even if solid levels of "urban growth" are realized. The issue is merely that one can only choose a large city or a very isolated rural area with very few choices in between in the core Plains region.
Kansas City is not doing well economically at all compared to the smaller metros like Des Moines, Omaha, Cedar Rapids, Rochester, Madison, Sioux Falls, Fargo, etc. Kansas puts all of its corporate welfare eggs in the basket of one county, Johnson County (suburban KC) while any economic progress is minimal at best in 98% of the rest of the state. I would call that severely unbalanced, even if favoring a metropolitan county.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2010, 06:37 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,871,785 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The major problem is we have only the big players left (both family and corporate farms). Both take in massive amounts of subsidies- taxpayer incurred money to support ridiculous endeavors like corn-based ethanol, completely unsustainable irrigation agriculture in semi-arid places, and dependency on corporate seed companies, fertilizer monopolies, and petrol reliance.

Only a few counties are doing well at the expense of an enormous area. That is not a good balance even if solid levels of "urban growth" are realized. The issue is merely that one can only choose a large city or a very isolated rural area with very few choices in between in the core Plains region.
Kansas City is not doing well economically at all compared to the smaller metros like Des Moines, Omaha, Cedar Rapids, Rochester, Madison, Sioux Falls, Fargo, etc. Kansas puts all of its corporate welfare eggs in the basket of one county, Johnson County (suburban KC) while any economic progress is minimal at best in 98% of the rest of the state. I would call that severely unbalanced, even if favoring a metropolitan county.
Kansas City isn't doing too terribly bad overall. Again, forget the rural decline, because that has been happening for six decades with the core of it being farming resource efficiency. It will continue because it there is no turning it around. What you have to do is work around it and that is what we are doing.

Back to KC, it is doing better than most cities across the country; even if it isn't doing well respective to it's neighboring cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2010, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 2,651,672 times
Reputation: 573
the 10s are the Canadian decade IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2010, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,530,828 times
Reputation: 1440
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
the 10s are the Canadian decade IMO.
Idiot ! they are the RenauFRian decade
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2010, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,766,011 times
Reputation: 3251
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Only a few counties are doing well at the expense of an enormous area. That is not a good balance even if solid levels of "urban growth" are realized. The issue is merely that one can only choose a large city or a very isolated rural area with very few choices in between in the core Plains region.
Kansas City is not doing well economically at all compared to the smaller metros like Des Moines, Omaha, Cedar Rapids, Rochester, Madison, Sioux Falls, Fargo, etc. Kansas puts all of its corporate welfare eggs in the basket of one county, Johnson County (suburban KC) while any economic progress is minimal at best in 98% of the rest of the state. I would call that severely unbalanced, even if favoring a metropolitan county.
Actually, this isn't true. The Plains area has plenty of smaller metros like Rapid City, Bismarck, Grand Forks, Mankato, Lincoln, Wichita and Mason City, not to mention the other Plains small cities you mentioned in your post (the Northern Plains are still very much part of the Plains region). If you consider OK and TX part of the Plains, you can throw in Oklahoma City, Amarillo, Lubbock and Austin. Eastern Colorado is geographically in the Plains, and it has Greeley, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs and Pueblo in addition to Denver. All of these cities are growing and have expanding economies.

As for the area's "odd social culture," why is it odd? Just because it's different from New Hampshire doesn't make it odd. Also, young, single people are moving here. I'm at least somewhat "young" and single. I didn't grow up here in the Northern Plains, I moved here from the eastern Midwest (Michigan) of my own volition. I know others here from Michigan, Illinois, etc. No, it's not NYC, LA, Boston or Chicago, but this area still has a lot to offer and plenty of things to do, without the high cost of living common to the coasts. It's a hidden gem.

Personally, I hope the coastal residents don't discover this part of the country -- I think it would ruin it in some ways.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top