U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-08-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,594,083 times
Reputation: 1934

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
No. New Orleans is culturally southern (more like Memphis, Atlanta, etc.), Montreal is culturally northern. That's like saying Anchorage and Houston have a lot in common because they both speak English. Montreal much more like Michigan than New Orleans / anywhere in Louisiana. Louisiana French speakers speak Cajun French, which is derived from Acadian -- different from what's spoken in Quebec.
uh hello, the acadians are from canada (including quebec)

and what is "culturally northern"? just because they get cold in the winter and are dense, european-style cities??? that makes no sense

fact is, both montreal and new orleans have that strong french influence that is a part of their culture
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-09-2010, 08:27 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,875,010 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
the official language of quebec is french. not a bit like michigan

i love the way some northerners proudly suggest that they are more like canada, as if being related to the south in anyway is such an insult. whether you like us or not, we're still your fellow countrymen....now kiss our backwards butts

Who said anything about insults? From my own experience visiting Canada and visiting the south, this Chicagoan whose extended family is mostly from New England felt that my visits to the Toronto area were much more culturally similar to my experiences in my region of the country than my visits to the south. This has nothing to do with who our fellow countrymen are, but simply a statement about how regional cultural similarity and/or differences often transcends national borders. If you you've ever traveled in Europe, where the countries are the size of some of our states, you will can easily experience how regional similarities often transcend national borders (Alsace region of France anyone?)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,403,107 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
and what is "culturally northern"? just because they get cold in the winter and are dense, european-style cities??? that makes no sense
There is something that could be called "culturally northern". It affects the way people dress, the activities they partake in (skiing, skating, etc.), what they eat, and a whole bunch of other stuff.

None of these comparisons are seamless and perfect, but there are things that places with northern climates tend to have in common. I am from Quebec and found a surprising number of commonalities with people in Scandinavia, for example.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,403,107 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
Louisiana French speakers speak Cajun French, which is derived from Acadian -- different from what's spoken in Quebec.
While it is true that Cajun French has its roots in Canada's Acadia, today's Acadian French (in Canada) and Quebec French are a lot closer to each other than either of them are to Cajun French. Cajun French is very, very different because of a few centuries of isolation, local influences that do not exist in Canada and an almost total lack of formal teaching in their language for Cajuns.

I say all of this as a native speaker of French.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,403,107 times
Reputation: 8613
I've never really agreed with all the talk of similarities between Montreal/Quebec City and New Orleans, based simply on their distant French colonial past. About the only things would be street and neighbourhood names and perhaps a passion for interesting cuisine. Even the architecture of the French Quarter is more Spanish colonial than French I'd say.

Plus, virtually no one speaks French in New Orleans, and the majority of the population is made up of African-Americans (not that I have anything against African-Americans). But when Canadian francophones go to Louisiana to find "distant cousins", they generally go to bayou country and places like Lafayette.

Now, I thought New Orleans was great and fun, but I didn't really feel at "home" there as a Canadian francophone (nor did I expect to). Bayou country didn't really feel that much like "home" either, but there was certainly something interesting and vaguely familiar there that doesn't exist in almost any other part of the U.S.

That said, the part of the U.S. that likely feels most like "home" for Canadian francophones is probably not Louisiana Cajun country, but rather northern Aroostook County in Maine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:28 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 21 days ago)
 
48,288 posts, read 45,576,705 times
Reputation: 15366
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
hey! my folks were slaves back then. we had nothing to do with that
Neither did mine. Most of them were slaves too. Actually, my father's parents left Mississippi in the 1940's and moved to Wisconsin. My father was born in Wisconsin. He moved to the South because of a job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:44 AM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,594,083 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
There is something that could be called "culturally northern". It affects the way people dress, the activities they partake in (skiing, skating, etc.), what they eat, and a whole bunch of other stuff.

None of these comparisons are seamless and perfect, but there are things that places with northern climates tend to have in common. I am from Quebec and found a surprising number of commonalities with people in Scandinavia, for example.
okay, but how does that translate into say philadelphia and montreal having a similar culture? i mean, southerners do travel up north to ski. we ice skate down here, as well

and i can't really think of any "northern" foods, unless they're items that are specific to one small region

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
While it is true that Cajun French has its roots in Canada's Acadia, today's Acadian French (in Canada) and Quebec French are a lot closer to each other than either of them are to Cajun French. Cajun French is very, very different because of a few centuries of isolation, local influences that do not exist in Canada and an almost total lack of formal teaching in their language for Cajuns.

I say all of this as a native speaker of French.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I've never really agreed with all the talk of similarities between Montreal/Quebec City and New Orleans, based simply on their distant French colonial past. About the only things would be street and neighbourhood names and perhaps a passion for interesting cuisine. Even the architecture of the French Quarter is more Spanish colonial than French I'd say.

Plus, virtually no one speaks French in New Orleans, and the majority of the population is made up of African-Americans (not that I have anything against African-Americans). But when Canadian francophones go to Louisiana to find "distant cousins", they generally go to bayou country and places like Lafayette.

Now, I thought New Orleans was great and fun, but I didn't really feel at "home" there as a Canadian francophone (nor did I expect to). Bayou country didn't really feel that much like "home" either, but there was certainly something interesting and vaguely familiar there that doesn't exist in almost any other part of the U.S.

That said, the part of the U.S. that likely feels most like "home" for Canadian francophones is probably not Louisiana Cajun country, but rather northern Aroostook County in Maine.
you state your point very well. +1
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,329,578 times
Reputation: 4270
I think Canada feels more like the North than the South does. If you crossed the border of Minnesota, Michigan/Ohio, North Dakota or New York, people dress, talk and act very similar to Northerners. I can't say the same is true at all when you cross the Mason-Dixon line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,403,107 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
okay, but how does that translate into say philadelphia and montreal having a similar culture? i mean, southerners do travel up north to ski. we ice skate down here, as well
It is hard for me to answer because I don't really consider Philadelphia to be "northern". It is sort of in that "middling" part of the U.S. which is neither truly northern or southern. When I think of northern places in the U.S. I think Minnesota, Vermont... places like that. Detroit is just about the southern limit of the "north", though most of Michigan is north of Detroit. Places where the average high in winter is at or below freezing. Philly is quite a bit above freezing.

Now, I don't think that Vermont is exactly the same culturally as Quebec just because it is cold and it snows on either side of the border. Obviously not. But the similarities in our climatological and geographic settings (and even human proximity) does provide us with some common points and interests for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
and i can't really think of any "northern" foods, unless they're items that are specific to one small region
Well, cuisine has gone global, so no one really eats their region's typical cuisine all the time anymore. But when I think of traditional Quebec cuisine, it tends to be hearty and lumberjack-ish, designed to help you survive the elements. I have found that the traditional cuisine of places with colder climates (Scandinavia, Russia, etc.) tends to be like this as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 10:19 AM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,594,083 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I think Canada feels more like the North than the South does. If you crossed the border of Minnesota, Michigan/Ohio, North Dakota or New York, people dress, talk and act very similar to Northerners. I can't say the same is true at all when you cross the Mason-Dixon line.
so new jersey and connecticut are more like canada than maryland and virginia? that's quite a bit of a stretch
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top