U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-04-2008, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,228,890 times
Reputation: 3346

Advertisements

Practically all of the large rust belt cities (save for some parts of Minneapolis, Chicago, and Indy)

Also, Louisville, KY for sure! Whoa!

Lastly, to some extent, Lexington, KY, Memphis, and (in a kind of good way) Galveston, TX.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-04-2008, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,722,899 times
Reputation: 15560
Sainte Genevieve, Missouri







this is just a taste. The entire downtown is full of 18th and 19th century houses and commercial establishments, its just gorgeous!
Like Galena, most of it is on the National Register, and quite a few are on the Trust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 07:50 PM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,749,392 times
Reputation: 1967
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Sainte Genevieve, Missouri

this is just a taste. The entire downtown is full of 18th and 19th century houses and commercial establishments, its just gorgeous!
Like Galena, most of it is on the National Register, and quite a few are on the Trust.
Nice pics...

There's lots of places in Missouri that are like that. They have a way of building something, and then not messing with it. Some more that I can think of are Lexington, downtown St. Joseph, and of course, Arrow Rock. North Kansas City (a little industrial suburb) has to look much like it did 60-70 years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 08:00 PM
 
208 posts, read 540,473 times
Reputation: 141
Driving through parts of western PA, eastern OH, and northern WV is like going back to the 1930's or earlier. Alot of the original houses and buildings still dot the small towns and countryside. Some specific towns and surrounding countryside I remember fitting that description are Zanesville, OH, Wheeling, WV, Washington, PA, Altoona, PA, and Fairmont, WV.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,497,326 times
Reputation: 207
Port Arthur/Beaumont/Vidor, Texas seems very stuck in the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 09:20 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,322,815 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Ah, I know the PERFECT town: Galena, IL. I think its actually billed as "the town that time forgot." Seriously. I believe that 95% of the town is on the National Register of Historic Places or something like that. Most of the town is pristine old Victorians, Italianates, Georgians, Union, Greek Revivals, etc, etc. The floors creek, the places smell old, the doors squeak and moan, etc. Its like an instant time warp back to the late 1800s or early 1900s. Ulysses S. Grants home is in town as well as 8 other Civil War generals. Abraham Lincoln gave several speaches in town, some sites are marked. Its just a town that is completely frozen in time.

Some shots I took of the Galena area:







What A gem! where is it located?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,196 posts, read 67,339,144 times
Reputation: 15835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
What A gem! where is it located?
Galena is in extreme northwestern Illinois in Jo Daviess County, not far from Dubuque, IA. It is west of Rockford, IL and north of the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River. I myself ordered travel brochures from Galena last year, as I hope to make a pit stop there during my eventual Upper Midwest road trip after graduation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,992,957 times
Reputation: 2364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapin2212 View Post
Philadelphia, Detroit, and Oakland still have that 70s and 80s ghetto feel. Baltimore does to a lesser extent. These cities will never improve, especially Detroit which has to deal not only with the auto industry but also with its miserable weather keeping people away. Yeah I don't now much about Buffalo but I image the same thing.
I think you have to switch Baltimore and Philadelphia around. Philadelphia is in better shape than Baltimore. Baltimore looks ghetto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2008, 10:07 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,372,703 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWB View Post
Galena is in extreme northwestern Illinois in Jo Daviess County, not far from Dubuque, IA. It is west of Rockford, IL and north of the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River. I myself ordered travel brochures from Galena last year, as I hope to make a pit stop there during my eventual Upper Midwest road trip after graduation.
Yeah, most people don't realize that Iowa and Illinois also look like this:






found on flickr

Those were Eastern Iowa, and even in western Iowa:

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2008, 07:37 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
48,102 posts, read 45,475,380 times
Reputation: 15330
Quote:
Originally Posted by quijote View Post
What cities do you know of that seem to have a "provincial" or "retro" feel to them, as if they never really left the '50s or some other past era? Of course, this applies even to cities that have acquired Starbucks, wi-fi fever, and other hallmarks of contemporary culture.... yet, in spite of it all, the city just seems so stuck in time, in a certain way.

An example could be Buffalo, NY (and the metro area), where either unemployment, underemployment, or low-paying service jobs have stepped in where decent factory jobs used to exist. Many people have left the city and the metro in general, but there are those who hang on there--some people do quite well there, but for most, the decline is palpable. Buffalo has pretty much missed out on the economic revivals of the past three decades, and the dot.com boom was barely noticeable there. Though a few retail/commercial zones show attempts to bring in new things, it seems that most of the residents continue to love things from the past: the traditional fish fry, football and hockey, clannish neighborhoods, generations-old taverns. Some sections of town look like they haven't changed in decades, and the same beer is gushing from their taps. Most people still think of prime rib and lobster as being the pinnacle of innovative high-class cuisine, and new fashions rarely ever take root, even among the well-heeled there.

Any other such places?
Buffalo does need some new things going on. Fish fry, lobster, hockey, beer, very good. I can do without the clannish neighborhoods though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top