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Old 12-02-2010, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Northridge, Los Angeles, CA
2,685 posts, read 6,356,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbergen View Post

my bolded statement above - about the chicago CSA being #4 and bay area CSA #5 with respect to their korean populations - refers to the 2000 census data, but i think your numbers refer to the 2009 census estimates, if i'm not mistaken? in other words, i think we're referring to two different sets (and timeframes) of data, nearly 10 years apart.

immediately following the bolded statement, i then transitioned into my 2010 census predictions about the korean community; sorry for the confusion.
It's alright man. I thought that there was something a BIT off about your numbers, but if its from 10 years ago, that would make a lot of sense.

I don't want to set anything in stone until the census results for this year come out (we gotta wait for another 6 months for that one)

Quote:
for what it's worth, my 2010 census predictions about the korean community were not at all based on the 2009 census estimates. my projected rankings were educated guesses based on what i've heard from korean community leaders and read in korean publications rather than hard census data. so that's why i forgot about seattle's korean population, which i'd been hearing is still slightly behind chicago's (although the census data obviously suggest otherwise). also, the estimates of the korean community leaders - which are obviously highly unscientific - have atlanta's korean population ranking as much higher than 7th, and certainly ahead of seattle and chicago, if not the bay area as well. for several years now, i've been hearing that atlanta's korean population is now at least the fifth largest in the nation, if not #4, so it's interesting to note the large discrepancy between the korean community's estimates and those of the census bureau.

needless to say, i'm very anxious to see the official 2010 data when they're finally released.
It wouldn't be fair for me to estimate the size of Atlanta's Korean population, seeing about how I've never been there. I don't know if its more of an East Coast Korean thing though, but the ones here on the West Coast rarely, if ever, talk about Atlanta. I've heard a lot more about people moving to Dallas or Houston when it comes to the south.

I would say this though: there are more and more Koreans that are moving from the central cities in LA and toward the suburbs. This is why places like Cerritos and Irvine have so many Korean people.

In addition, I tend to notice that when it comes to Seattle, people are wary about making any ethnic estimates on the place because it sort of has a reputation for being extremely White (it is, but not as overwhelming as Salt Lake City or Portland). The Seattle Area has an extremely diverse Asian population that tends to get overlooked from time to time. However, the closer one gets to the University of Washington or Bellevue, the more and more Koreans there are. Weird, but true.


Quote:
i think when people say that "LA has more koreans than any place outside of korea", they're only comparing cities or metropolitan areas. in other words, there isn't a single metro area outside of korea which has more koreans than the greater LA area. but as you noted, there are certainly entire nations with larger korean populations than the LA area - most notably china (~2 million ethnic koreans) and japan (~600K ethnic koreans).

if i'm not mistaken (and i'm too lazy to look it up - i'm not the stathead that you are, lifeshadower), the u.s. has the third largest ethnic korean population in the world after the korean peninsula (south + north korea) and china (mainly northeast china near the korean border). i don't know which metro area outside of korea has the second largest korean population, but i'm 99% sure that the LA area is still #1 in that regard.
Hmm, I know its out of the scope for this thread, but the Koreans in China basically have their own autonomous ethnic zone (Yaniban) in Northeastern China. However, it seems that the Koreans there assimilate pretty quickly to Chinese society, while American society kind of favors keeping distinct cultures apart (except if you're European, that's a different story). No one really knows HOW many Koreans live in China, or Japan for that matter.

When it comes to cities, at least with people who identify themselves as Korean or partially Korean, I agree that LA is probably the city/metro with the most outside of Korea. If I only knew how to read Chinese and could decipher their own census....

Quote:
i agree 100%. every bay area korean i've ever met has told me how the korean community there is not nearly as concentrated or unified as LA or nyc. seems that the largest population of koreans in the bay area these days is in the santa clara/silicon valley area, followed by the east bay. the city of sf really doesn't have much of a korean population at all, which largely explains why the korean food there is so awful.
The Bay Area is sort of weird when it comes to any Asian population. There's really an apparent 'Pan-Asian' theme going on there to a much larger extent than LA or NYC (for reasons I can't quite figure out). There are ethnic cliques for sure, but every Asian group seemed to have little problems with dating each other when it came down to it.

Koreans are probably the only Asian group in the Bay Area that doesn't really have a 'central city' to call their own (IE: SF for the Chinese, Daly City/Vallejo for Filipinos, Fremont for Indians/Pakistanis, San Jose for Vietnamese, Cambodians/Laotians with Oakland)


Quote:
if you ever need suggestions for korean restaurants in LA, send me a DM. i've got plenty of ktown recommendations, but unfortunately i don't know anything about the valley's korean food scene. i do know that most of the authentic places are in the northridge area, but i haven't been to any of them.
I'm actually quite that way pretty often (I sometimes train at this boxing gym in Hollywood, and hang out with friends there). I used to hang out on Alexandria and 6th when I was a teenager, so I'm pretty familiar with that part of K-Town. Plus, sometimes work takes me to that area. In the Valley, the best Korean restaurant I ate at was this place on Reseda and Roscoe, across the street from the Northridge Hospital, next to the 7/11. There is also this concentration of Korean restaurants on Saticoy and White Oak, but I only ate at one of those places (it was alright).

The only problem I have with eating Korean food is that its too freakin' expensive. It's hard to find things that are less than $10 in most Korean places. However, when friends home make stuff for me, that stuff is too good. I still need to try Kogi's taco truck just to see what the hubbub is all about.

BTW: How come most of the Japanese restaurants in the LA area are owned by Koreans? Unlike non-Asians, I can tell
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Old 12-02-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,909 posts, read 12,164,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
lol, do all jokes just completely fly over your head???
Yes. I have no sense of humor...
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Old 12-02-2010, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,435,180 times
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Koreans in Japan are second-range citizens, they're so much better in the US.
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Old 12-02-2010, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,160,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Yes. I have no sense of humor...
okay, I will keep that in mind
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Old 12-03-2010, 10:51 AM
 
1,538 posts, read 5,278,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifeshadower View Post
I don't know if its more of an East Coast Korean thing though, but the ones here on the West Coast rarely, if ever, talk about Atlanta. I've heard a lot more about people moving to Dallas or Houston when it comes to the south.
i've heard that a very large number of the koreans who've piled into atlanta over the past 10-12 years are transplants from the bos-wash corridor, esp. nyc/nj and dc/nova. i'm sure some of the transplants are from the west coast, but anecdotally at least, their numbers are greatly outnumbered by the east coast koreans. so this pretty much confirms your personal observations.

makes sense, too - lots of northerners of all backgrounds have moved down to atlanta in recent years, while texas seems to be a huge destination for transplanted californians. i guess all these different people are motivated by the same factors (cheaper housing, job opportunities) - but at least with the koreans, atlanta, dallas, and houston became much more attractive once those cities' korean communities became large enough to support a decent restaurant and supermarket district.

Quote:
I would say this though: there are more and more Koreans that are moving from the central cities in LA and toward the suburbs. This is why places like Cerritos and Irvine have so many Korean people.
agree 100%. fullerton is probably considered the heart of OC's korean community nowadays (with irvine a strong #2), and cerritos is basically part of that same east-west corridor straddling the LA/OC county border (cerritos-la palma-buena park-fullerton). la canada has apparently become a major destination, too, for those who can afford it and want to move up from glendale.

Quote:
Hmm, I know its out of the scope for this thread, but the Koreans in China basically have their own autonomous ethnic zone (Yaniban) in Northeastern China. However, it seems that the Koreans there assimilate pretty quickly to Chinese society, while American society kind of favors keeping distinct cultures apart (except if you're European, that's a different story).
yes, yanbian (or "yeonbyeon" in korean) is that autonomous korean area right near the north korea border. historically it was part of korea, but my ancestors lost that land a few hundred years ago due to some shoddy surveying and cartography skills.

nowadays, koreans from china comprise a fairly high percentage of the ethnic koreans who are moving to LA and NYC (not sure about other u.s. cities). a lot of them work as waitresses at the restaurants in ktown or as cashiers at the korean supermarkets. it's really weird, but these people speak totally fluent korean and mandarin, which is great for chinese folks who love going out to eat korean food.

in any event, it seems that these ethnic koreans in china are well-integrated into mainstream chinese society but also have a stronger connection to their korean heritage than korean-americans - at least compared with the KAs i know. then again, i'm basing my opinion on firsthand experience only, which is hardly representative.

Quote:
The Bay Area is sort of weird when it comes to any Asian population. There's really an apparent 'Pan-Asian' theme going on there to a much larger extent than LA or NYC (for reasons I can't quite figure out). There are ethnic cliques for sure, but every Asian group seemed to have little problems with dating each other when it came down to it.
i wonder if the stronger pan-asian identity in the bay area has to do with the longer history of asian-american activism compared to other cities. even for newer asian immigrant groups, to arrive in an area that has an entrenched, unified asian-american identity with decades of history to back it up might make it easier for the second generation to become a part of that "asian-american mainstream", so to speak. whereas in other cities that lack that dynamic, each asian group kind of has to fend for itself in trying to find its own identity, which may explain the stronger ethnic cliques and weaker pan-asian identity.

Quote:
Koreans are probably the only Asian group in the Bay Area that doesn't really have a 'central city' to call their own (IE: SF for the Chinese, Daly City/Vallejo for Filipinos, Fremont for Indians/Pakistanis, San Jose for Vietnamese, Cambodians/Laotians with Oakland)
i've noticed this, and find it really weird. the bay area koreans i've met can't explain how this happened, and just go down to LA for weekend trips when they want to get their "korean fix". santa clara and the east bay hold them over as far as local korean restaurant and bar options, but they all seem to agree that the overall korean scene in the bay area is pretty lacking compared to LA.

Quote:
The only problem I have with eating Korean food is that its too freakin' expensive. It's hard to find things that are less than $10 in most Korean places. However, when friends home make stuff for me, that stuff is too good. I still need to try Kogi's taco truck just to see what the hubbub is all about.
yeah, the only things that are (sometimes) cheaper than $10 are stews, soups, some stir-fry dishes, noodles, dumplings, korean-style japanese curry, etc. i think you'd be better off checking out the "specialized restaurants" that focus more on comfort food (i.e. the stuff koreans actually eat at home on a daily basis) rather than the places with large, all-encompassing menus, which not only tend to be expensive but also not as good for these "core" dishes, since they're focused on the big ticket items like barbecue.

there are a lot of good specialist restaurants in ktown, but it's a matter of whether you can (or already have) acquired a taste for these dishes. you might want to check out the food court in koreatown plaza on western ave, which has some good, cheap take-out stalls and a central seating area. here's an example of a good, cheap, comfort food eatery that you might like. if you want to go to a real restaurant with waiter service, here's a good, cheap option with a variety of authentic comfort food dishes. or you can get $1 hot, deep-fried rice cakes from a streetcart; incidentally, this is one of many korean foods whose only u.s. availability is in LA.

as for kogi, it's pretty decent i guess, but i wouldn't wait more than 15 minutes for it. some people think it's amazing, but i wouldn't go that far. worth a try if you're near one of their trucks.

Quote:
BTW: How come most of the Japanese restaurants in the LA area are owned by Koreans? Unlike non-Asians, I can tell
when korean immigrants started arriving to the u.s. a few decades ago, the ones who entered the restaurant industry figured that it was smarter to advertise themselves as japanese restaurants, since that was considered more familiar to the average american. these older restaurants served mainstream, stereotypical japanese dishes but hid a few korean items on the menu for those in the know. it didn't hurt that japanese and korean cuisines utilize a pretty fair amount of the same ingredients, and that japanese cooking techniques aren't that hard to pick up for those who have experience preparing korean food. it's analogous to some of the older "greek" restaurants in LA actually being owned and operated by armenians.

then as the korean community grew in certain large metros - especially LA and NYC - these places started to advertise themselves as "korean/japanese" and made korean food the focal point of their menus while keeping japanese food on the side for those who still wanted it. finally, super specialized, hardcore korean spots with no japanese pretensions began to open up and flourish in LA and the NYC metro.

in areas of the country where the korean community remains small, the first two types of japanese or pseudo-japanese restaurants are the norm. but in LA, the first type - the japanese restaurant with korean owners - became kind of a niche within the korean restaurant industry. whereas the first generation of korean-owned japanese restaurants in LA were labeled as japanese out of necessity, the newer wave that have opened in recent years were born out of pure business interests, fueled by the knowledge that the average american can't tell the difference anyway, not to mention the fact that japanese dishes like sushi and sashimi have a very high profit margin.

in other words, that first wave of korean-owned japanese restaurants from the '70s and '80s allowed the korean restaurant community to gain a foothold in that particular niche, while the second wave used that prior market infiltration to their advantage. the chinese have done the same thing as well, to equally mediocre culinary results.

btw, have you noticed how most of the korean-owned japanese restaurants are located in areas where the japanese don't reside in large numbers? that's not a coincidence; these places are meant to cater to everyone except the japanese. on the other hand, heavily japanese areas like torrance don't seem to have too many of these spots since authentic japanese owned-and-operated restaurants are abundant.

needless to say, i only like going to the japanese-owned-and-operated spots for my japanese fix. little tokyo and sawtelle are the most centrally located, but torrance/gardena is pretty much the epicenter of really great and authentic japanese eats in LA.

Last edited by pbergen; 12-03-2010 at 11:13 AM..
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Old 12-04-2010, 05:26 PM
 
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Well I'm not from the East or West Coast so my experience is very different from the rest. My state has a decent amount of Asians and I'm okay with it. I do wish that we have more Japanese, Chinese, and Korean but it's probably never going to happen since most of the Asians are either here for U of M or are adopted. I rarely see any other Asians besides Hmong people and it's normal to see them in certain areas of the city. IMO, sometimes I think that Hmong people are so ethnocentric but you also see Hmong people that are not that ethnocentric as well. I have to say though, the Hmong community is well establish over here. I grew up in a black neighborhood and now I'm living in a very diverse community (which I love) but am attending to a white Christian school where I'm surrounded by white people. So I got a little taste of everything. I'm actually more comfortable with the diversity than just all Asians or all white or all black.

When I went to California I was kind of excited but nervous. Why? I've never been to a city (besides Sac) that was populated with Vietnamese, Thai, Laotians, and Chinese. I went to San Jose, if anyone wants to know. I heard that Koreans and Japanese are mostly located in the L.A area and Hmong people are located in the Sac area. I think it's kind of true because I've got some friends from L.A and they are Koreans. At first, I was kind of uncomfortable because I've never been around with so much different ethnicity before. TBH, I'm not jealous at Asians who live in the West Coast because I think I am more comfortable in my own environment now. I used to be extremely nervous but not anymore. If I move there (anywhere in the West), I'll move there for the culture (not just Asian culture), education, or work.

How do I feel about them? TBH, I'm not so sure. Sometimes I find them kind of closed-minded or prideful, in a sense, that they believe California is better than anywhere else. Ok, MN is probably nothing compare to California but be at least open minded about it. I ask a couple of friends if they would ever move to MN and they said no. I ask why? And they said it's the population. Really? Or is it just that you want to live in this spoil (yes, some of the are extremely spoil) rich life where everything is about you? Yes, I am from a low-class family. I kind of have some strong bias view towards Asians who live in West Coast but maybe it's just towards my friends over there? Idk. Sometimes I just don't know what's worse, a fob who wants to fit in or an Americanized Asians who think they're too good. I find it really interesting that I'm from a low class but I am more culturally aware than most of my Asian friends in California. I also realize that my other low class friend is also more culturally aware than some of her other friends. My rich and spoil friends are less culturally aware. They're from middle to high class.
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Old 12-15-2010, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
61 posts, read 189,997 times
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I was raised in Vancouver.

I moved to Houston for a few years (2002-2004) and was surprised at how big the Asian population was there.

Once I got settled in, it actually felt like Vancouver.

Many Asian restaurants, shops, etc. and even the Asian nightlife was similar to Vancouver.

In the end I moved back to Vancouver cause it's home but I wouldn't hesitate to move back to Houston if I got offered a better job there.
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