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Old 12-05-2010, 07:32 PM
 
130 posts, read 483,956 times
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I love the extremely specific, original question!

I live in Oklahoma (spend a good amount of time in Texas/Missouri/Kansas), and their are a lot of Cedar trees and Junipers (I believe). From what I understand, these were planted after the 1930's in massive numbers, especially on the perimeter of fields and along roads. I see the same thing in Southwestern Missouri and in North Texas.
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Old 12-05-2010, 07:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seanm83 View Post
I would say the south in general has more pine/evergreen and the north has more deciduous overall.
I wouldn't say that any southern state has more pines than deciduous trees, though it's fairly close in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida (most of Florida south of Orlando/Tampa and north of Lake City is pine), and perhaps Mississippi or Alabama.

My own best estimates, based on my extensive travel, as well as information seen:

Kentucky: 99% Deciduous, 1% Evergreen
Tennessee: 93% Deciduous, 7% Evergreen
Virginia: 81% Deciduous, 19% Evergreen
North Carolina: 64% Deciduous, 36% Evergreen
South Carolina: 56% Deciduous, 44% Evergreen
Georgia: 52% Deciduous, 48% Evergreen
Florida: 54% Deciduous, 46% Evergreen
Alabama: 60% Deciduous, 40% Evergreen
Mississippi: 62% Deciduous, 38% Evergreen
Louisiana: 80% Deciduous, 20% Evergreen
Arkansas: 94% Deciduous, 6% Evergreen


Quote:
Also the North has different types of evergreen such as spruce, hemlock, fir i think and white pine, while down south is loblolly, long-leaf, short-leaf, slash, etc.
Northern evergreens are more diverse in number, in general. However, many of those same evergreens can be found in the higher elevations of the Appalachians throughout the South.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:23 PM
 
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Long leaf pines grow in abundance in Florida.

Pinus palustris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,573 posts, read 5,653,507 times
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In addition to the prevalence of pine trees in southern states, I also note that pine straw (brown, fallen pine needles sold by the bundle) is one of the preferred items for landscaping mulch. I used to use pine straw as mulch when I lived in Atlanta, as did many of my neighbors. It was cheap, looked good, and did a good job of containing weeds. Now I live in Northern Virginia and I can't seem to find pine straw anywhere. I guess it might be due to the lack of abundant pine trees that make it such a cheap landscaping option down south.
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Old 12-06-2010, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,186 posts, read 10,305,280 times
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Around metro Orlando/Central FL:

orlando - Google Maps

orlando - Google Maps

orlando - Google Maps

orlando - Google Maps

orlando - Google Maps

orlando - Google Maps
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Old 12-06-2010, 12:00 PM
 
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Thanks for the replies, i'd love to hear more opinions about northern states, and how they compare to canadian areas at similar latitudes.

When i visitede Minneapolis, i was shocked, because my pre-conception was that in Minnesota, 95 percent of trees were evergreens....
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Old 12-06-2010, 12:50 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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I've noticed that the Appalachian Mountains are a pretty stark dividing line between coniferous and deciduous. I think trees in general grow taller in the South because there's more warmth, more sunshine and more rainfall. I also think that different trees grow well in different soils. Pine trees seem to grow well in sandy soil, but poorly in rocky soil. That might explain why the Appalachian Mountains are more deciduous.
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Old 12-06-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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The Pitch Pine is pretty common for the inland areas of Southern NJ.
The Pine Barrens in general is predominately pine trees.
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Old 12-07-2010, 10:20 AM
 
116 posts, read 181,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I wouldn't say that any southern state has more pines than deciduous trees, though it's fairly close in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida (most of Florida south of Orlando/Tampa and north of Lake City is pine), and perhaps Mississippi or Alabama.

My own best estimates, based on my extensive travel, as well as information seen:

Kentucky: 99% Deciduous, 1% Evergreen
Tennessee: 93% Deciduous, 7% Evergreen
Virginia: 81% Deciduous, 19% Evergreen
North Carolina: 64% Deciduous, 36% Evergreen
South Carolina: 56% Deciduous, 44% Evergreen
Georgia: 52% Deciduous, 48% Evergreen
Florida: 54% Deciduous, 46% Evergreen
Alabama: 60% Deciduous, 40% Evergreen
Mississippi: 62% Deciduous, 38% Evergreen
Louisiana: 80% Deciduous, 20% Evergreen
Arkansas: 94% Deciduous, 6% Evergreen




Northern evergreens are more diverse in number, in general. However, many of those same evergreens can be found in the higher elevations of the Appalachians throughout the South.
Yes i know my point was that overall the North has a higher % of deciduous from my observation. Yes the South has more deciduous than evergreen, but by a lesser margin. And that is true in the mountains maybe because of the climate there is an abundance of deciduous trees as well as some spruce, hemlock, etc. And I noticed the south has different types of evergreen, different pines less spruce, etc. I know there are white pines and spruce and hemlock just like there are probably some loblolly further north but percentage wise it's more loblolly/long-leaf/slash in the south and more white pine/spruce/hemlock up north. We also have some cedar in the Charlotte area I'm not sure how much they have up north I'm pretty sure there is red cedar and juniper types up there too.
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Old 12-07-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,334 posts, read 17,109,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N130 View Post
I'd say coniferous trees make up less than 5% of the trees in NYC, probably 1-3%. I see them everyday, there's not a little bit but compared to deciduous trees their numbers are very very small. They're not so much the one's you see in the more Northern parts of the US & Canada, they don't look like those. I'll try to find pics.

I hate the way deciduous tree dominate so much lol, they're ugly in the Winter.

Edit: Now after googling around I'm assuming The Eastern White Pine is one of the trees I'm talking about.

They look similar to this but smaller and the branches aren't as spread out.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...obus_trees.jpg
Hmm I agree with mostly everything but I'd say coniferous trees make up slightly more than 1-3% in some spots, just slightly more to maybe 4-7%. But I guess it depends on where in NYC you go, even within NYC there's a lot of geographical & geological differences.
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