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Old 12-07-2010, 06:47 PM
 
759 posts, read 1,673,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
The most fashionable people in the Chicago area in my opinion are upper middle class/upscale African Americans, and some young Polish/eastern European immigrants.
Yes, I would agree with this. Especially upscale African Americans.
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Old 12-09-2010, 01:42 AM
 
Location: Chicago
721 posts, read 1,575,365 times
Reputation: 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohio248 View Post
Chicago is a cool town, but has absolutely nothing to do with NYC. It also doesn´t appear to have anything to do with Melbourne or your specific preferences.

I would reiterate that Seattle sounds the closest to what you may be looking for, though it could be a bit on the small side. And if you return to NYC, try south of 23rd or Brooklyn.
Chicago and New York are similar...you know it as well as I do. Chicago may not be a clone of New York, but both cities offer similar services. Am I wrong about that? Can you prove it with a reliable source? I didn't think so...

Last edited by Bo; 12-12-2010 at 08:07 AM.. Reason: Updated quote to match original. Removed portion of reply that was orphaned.
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Old 12-09-2010, 04:44 AM
 
759 posts, read 1,673,598 times
Reputation: 358
Moderator cut: orphaned Seattle sounds up your alley.

Chicago has absolutely nothing to do with NYC. And it has nothing to do with Melbourne, or any of your listed preferences.

Check out Seattle, and see if it´s a reasonable size for your needs. If not, try some other neighborhood in NYC, or perhaps check out a few other West coast cities.

Last edited by Bo; 12-12-2010 at 08:08 AM.. Reason: orphaned - the posts you were replying to were edited
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Old 12-10-2010, 07:29 AM
 
17 posts, read 49,631 times
Reputation: 30
I've been thinking and leaning toward Chicago.

These may seem like stupid questions, but what do "average" Chicago folk aged 21 - 35 do after work and on the weekends? Are they sports mad (please no, I would love to escape the words Cricket and Football)? Is there a big fine dining scene there? Festivals? Markets?

Rental wise, I have been looking around the loop, streeterville, goldcoast, near northside. Any other recommendations?

I never realised how cheap quality apartments were there (compared to NYC and Sydney, both very expensive places to live), I'm shocked. I pay lots more for lots less in Sydney.

Realistically LA is out, as I don't have a licence and never really intend to get one. Although there is public transport, it is limited compared to other cities. I'm not big on the beach or sun, or any culture related to it.

[SIZE=3][SIZE=3]Seattle does seem more what I am looking for, but the size is an issue. Does anyone know of a blog or site dedicated to Seattle that I can check out?

Re: NYC - I must be surrounded by aesthetically pleasing architecture and streets It sounds a little princess, but it honestly affects my mood. Run down buildings, ****ty looking streets, crappy shopfronts make me sad. I always loved the UWS as it was the most beautiful part of the city imo.

Any intel on Toronto?
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Old 12-10-2010, 12:43 PM
 
5,837 posts, read 10,805,612 times
Reputation: 4429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dncr View Post
Wow, you nailed it! I'm boosting! That's why you chose to only quote the part of my post that discredited you. You know everything else I've said is accurate.

Chicago and New York are similar...you know it as well as I do. Chicago may not be a clone of New York, but both cities offer similar services. Am I wrong about that? Can you prove it with a reliable source? I didn't think so...

People often say that Chicago is like a smaller, cheaper, friendlier version of New York. One that is more "livable" "cleaner", without all the hype, but with all the opportunities, excitement, culture, etc.

Problem is, once you say this, seriously, there is no reason why Minneapolis-St. Paul or Seattle can't say the same thing. The Twin cities has an incredible theater district, very vibrant, and educated, etc. Or Atlanta, or Dallas Fort Worth

The argument about Chicago being a scaled down version of New York is totally empty because you can take other cities 1/3 to 1/2 the size of Chicago and say the same thing.

New York: 8 million people, in a metro area of 21 million, with city pop density of 26,000 pp/sqmi

Chicago: 2.9 million people, in a metro area of 9.6 million, with city pop density of 12,500 pp/sqmi

Minn-StPaul: City proper (together) 650,000, metro area 3.2 mil, Minneapolis density is 7,000 pp/sqmi

Seattle: About the exact same as MSPL

Dallas Fort Worth: 1.2 mil in Dallas, 650,000 in Fort Worth. 6 mil in metro area, although pop densities are low due to annexation of farm land to SE of Dallas (3,600 pp/sqmi)

Atlanta: smaller than DFW: 500,000 in city, 5 mil in metro area, 4,000 pp/sqmi


Again, no can make the argument that Chicago and New York are similar.

This logic about Chicago being similar to New York only applies to Chicago for the Loop, Mag Mile, Gold Coast, and parts of River North. Sout Loop and Streeterville look so new, that they are practically "sunbelt" (think Miami) that don't look the least bit east coast (this is what you get in a midwestern city that had wharves, and railyards on the edge of downtown for a good chunk of the cities history). And Lincoln Park and beyond look like other cities.
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Old 12-11-2010, 10:38 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,222 posts, read 23,744,506 times
Reputation: 11669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melbournian87 View Post
I have lived previously in NYC for 12 months (UWS) and it was great, but in the end, the people just shat me to tears. Neurotic people complaining to me whilst lining up at Chase about a 2 minute wait. People seemed angry about life, I felt it rub off on me.

So, moving to the States or Canada permanently this time.


New York seems like the obvious option. I live in Sydney these days (crap hole with no soul), but grew up in Helsinki and then lived in Melbourne for 10 years. Melbourne is my favourite city in the entire world. I am trying to live somewhere that reminds me of Melbourne.

For those that aren't familiar with Melbourne

*Around 4 million people
*Excellent transport system (trains, trams/light rail, buses)
*CBD with suburbs that lead out to beaches, forests (beaches are nice, but not important)
*5 star dining and shopping
*Culturally rich city, huge arts and music scene
*Lots of gorgeous architecture
*Many parks and open spaces
*Diverse. Mixed races, gay friendly, cliquey but not always pretentious
*Good nightlife, excellent bars and late night venues
*Fashion forward
*Very cool place in general
*Melbourne people are very go with the flow. We have the whole 8 hour day system in Australia. Work is not a focus of peoples lives, rather spending time with friends and out and about.
*Weather is 35 - 70 in winter generally. 75 to 110 in summer, but the past few summer have been getting to 115 (winter weather is perfect, I prefer it cold. I find summer too hot in Australia).


I have been to LA previously, but never stayed there long enough to judge it. I have the feeling, peoples personalities may annoy me from what I read on this forum. Yes Melbourne is a bit of a hipster town and has a very pretentious fashion and arts scene, but people aren't concerned with how much you earn there.

Chicago I went to for 2 weeks, but mainly for work. What I saw of, I loved. The people dressed (on average) better than people in New York. There seemed to be a big enough creative scene, shopping and nightlife and people were friendly. I never caught public transport besides taxis, so how does it compare to NYC? I stayed in the Gold Coast and ventured to surrounding areas. It's lovely, but I think it may be too small and perhaps boring?

Seattle, I have never been to. A few people I know told me it was cool. The weather is very similar to Melbourne and had a similar "feel" to it. Can anyone give me any Intel on it? I've done searches on here, but in comparison to say Chicago and Ny?

Finally, Toronto. Been their briefly a few years back for work. Nice place. Seems to have everything I am looking for, but it can get very cold and it's..canada. I don't know too much about Canada.


About me - 24 years old, single, female, take home around $150k per annum after state and federal tax in NY for example, Self employed, work is no issue. Don't drive. Felt safe in NYC, so crime isn't an issue.


Suggestions and things I should consider?

Thanks
San Francisco really sounds like something you can get behind. It satisfies absolutely every criteria you've listed.
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Old 12-12-2010, 10:17 PM
 
205 posts, read 440,080 times
Reputation: 82
Chicago is one of my favorite cities, the downtown area is great and the waterfront is amazing. IMO Toronto is the closest city I can think of to Chicago, they are both massive cities on the great lakes with huge downtown's....and spread into endless suburban sprawl.
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Old 12-13-2010, 12:49 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,483,001 times
Reputation: 11862
I'm not jealous, but you're 24 and already earning $150,000? You can't be long out of uni. Good on you anyway...

Curious as to why you want to move to America permanently? Are you sure you'll be able to settle there permanently?

I know Melbourne well but have never visited the US (probably next June). I've heard Seattle is the closest to Melbourne in weather, vibe etc. It's also only slightly smaller.
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Old 01-01-2011, 02:01 AM
 
76 posts, read 75,319 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melbournian87 View Post
I have lived previously in NYC for 12 months (UWS) and it was great, but in the end, the people just shat me to tears. Neurotic people complaining to me whilst lining up at Chase about a 2 minute wait. People seemed angry about life, I felt it rub off on me.

So, moving to the States or Canada permanently this time.


New York seems like the obvious option. I live in Sydney these days (crap hole with no soul), but grew up in Helsinki and then lived in Melbourne for 10 years. Melbourne is my favourite city in the entire world. I am trying to live somewhere that reminds me of Melbourne.

For those that aren't familiar with Melbourne

*Around 4 million people
*Excellent transport system (trains, trams/light rail, buses)
*CBD with suburbs that lead out to beaches, forests (beaches are nice, but not important)
*5 star dining and shopping
*Culturally rich city, huge arts and music scene
*Lots of gorgeous architecture
*Many parks and open spaces
*Diverse. Mixed races, gay friendly, cliquey but not always pretentious
*Good nightlife, excellent bars and late night venues
*Fashion forward
*Very cool place in general
*Melbourne people are very go with the flow. We have the whole 8 hour day system in Australia. Work is not a focus of peoples lives, rather spending time with friends and out and about.
*Weather is 35 - 70 in winter generally. 75 to 110 in summer, but the past few summer have been getting to 115 (winter weather is perfect, I prefer it cold. I find summer too hot in Australia).


I have been to LA previously, but never stayed there long enough to judge it. I have the feeling, peoples personalities may annoy me from what I read on this forum. Yes Melbourne is a bit of a hipster town and has a very pretentious fashion and arts scene, but people aren't concerned with how much you earn there.

Chicago I went to for 2 weeks, but mainly for work. What I saw of, I loved. The people dressed (on average) better than people in New York. There seemed to be a big enough creative scene, shopping and nightlife and people were friendly. I never caught public transport besides taxis, so how does it compare to NYC? I stayed in the Gold Coast and ventured to surrounding areas. It's lovely, but I think it may be too small and perhaps boring?

Seattle, I have never been to. A few people I know told me it was cool. The weather is very similar to Melbourne and had a similar "feel" to it. Can anyone give me any Intel on it? I've done searches on here, but in comparison to say Chicago and Ny?

Finally, Toronto. Been their briefly a few years back for work. Nice place. Seems to have everything I am looking for, but it can get very cold and it's..canada. I don't know too much about Canada.


About me - 24 years old, single, female, take home around $150k per annum after state and federal tax in NY for example, Self employed, work is no issue. Don't drive. Felt safe in NYC, so crime isn't an issue.


Suggestions and things I should consider?

Thanks

I haven't been to Melbourne, so I don't know what the weather or "feel" of it is. But I have lived here 3 years and can give you some insight.

First off, the negative:
-There are a lot of gloomy, rainy days. The sun does shine sometimes, and it even gets warm here in the summer, but most of the time it is just gloomy and dark outside.
-The traffic can be a nightmare, and there isn't much in the way of public transportation (although it can be done).
-It's expensive. There is a high tax rate (close to 10%!).
-The people here can be pretentious and standoff-ish. Not all of them, but a lot. People rarely smile, and are usually seen with their earphones in, staring at the ground.
- Nightlife (if you're straight). Most bars and clubs will have 6 guys for every girl.


But there are good things too:
-This is one of the most beautiful areas in the country. Mountains, water, and lush green everywhere. Lots of parks.
-There is a lot to do. Lots of museums, places to see live music, etc..
-Fairly stable economy. The economic recession didn't hit Seattle quite as hard as some other places.
-This is a very laid back place (but not really fashion conscious).
-It's also very gay friendly. I'm straight, so I have no idea what the nightlife is like at gay bars. But I know there are several.
-There is a huge arts/music scene here. Lots of outdoor public art and sculptures, several art museums, and lots of galleries.

There are good and bad things about this place...I hope my insight helped!
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Old 01-02-2011, 09:59 PM
 
Location: outer boroughs, NYC
905 posts, read 2,584,991 times
Reputation: 442
Chicago is quite colder than New York in the wintertime. You'll notice it, but you'll get used to it without much trouble if you've lived in NYC. Outside of winter, the weather is pretty similar - it rains a bit more in New York, I think.

Chicago is definitely a big sports town, probably the biggest of any you've mentioned. But it's such a huge and diverse city that you can still easily ignore it. People aren't going to think you are strange for not being into sports. It definitely has what you want in terms of food and cultural attractions, and during the summer, there's street festivals practically every weekend.

Someone mentioned San Francisco - you might want to give that one some thought.

Also, Brooklyn. I grew up in the NYC burbs, lived in Chicago for a year, now I'm in Brooklyn - I don't know that we are any less neurotic than Manhattanites, but it's definitely more laid-back. Regarding architecture, on your income you could easily afford to live in, say, Brooklyn Heights or Park Slope, which are absolutely beautiful neighborhoods, with tree-lined streets and gorgeous brownstones. I honestly think they are more beautiful than anywhere in Manhattan, including the UWS. Anyway, it's something to consider. Chicago's great, though.
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