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Old 12-20-2010, 08:32 PM
 
43 posts, read 97,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtownboogie View Post
I know this is going to sound crazy to some of you, but I have a real liking of "rustbelt" cities. I find old rusty wharehouses and brick buildings appealing to the eyes. Does anyone else feel like this?
You've got to come to The Triple Cities in upstate new york, Johnson City and Binghamton especially have lots of old abandonned factories
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Old 12-20-2010, 11:26 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,543 posts, read 7,479,752 times
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I love the rust-belt cities -- the old industrial sites, brick warehouses, railyards, etc. I grew up in Michigan, in a small town. Most of Michigan is small towns and farmland, interspersed with suburban Applebee's areas. I moved to Pittsburgh a few years ago. Last year I bought a circa 1909 brick row-house in McKees Rocks, a declined industrial neighborhood just outside Pittsburgh.

I have taken many pictures of gritty areas in and around Pittsburgh and McKees Rocks. To see my photo tours (and pictures of my row-house project), click on this link:

Discovering Historic Pittsburgh
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Old 12-20-2010, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,619,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
I love the rust-belt cities -- the old industrial sites, brick warehouses, railyards, etc. I grew up in Michigan, in a small town. Most of Michigan is small towns and farmland, interspersed with suburban Applebee's areas. I moved to Pittsburgh a few years ago. Last year I bought a circa 1909 brick row-house in McKees Rocks, a declined industrial neighborhood just outside Pittsburgh.

I have taken many pictures of gritty areas in and around Pittsburgh and McKees Rocks. To see my photo tours (and pictures of my row-house project), click on this link:

Discovering Historic Pittsburgh
Thanks for posting this. I'm also from Michigan, and most of the state is NOT rust belt. It's forest, farmland, small towns and suburbia.
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,902 posts, read 7,700,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
Thanks for posting this. I'm also from Michigan, and most of the state is NOT rust belt. It's forest, farmland, small towns and suburbia.
What state IS mostly rust belt?
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Old 12-21-2010, 08:44 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,543 posts, read 7,479,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
What state IS mostly rust belt?
Ohio and Pennsylvania
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,522,953 times
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No state is mostly rust belt. Just portions of the older urbanized areas in those states.
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Old 12-23-2010, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
624 posts, read 1,210,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleCities View Post
You've got to come to The Triple Cities in upstate new york, Johnson City and Binghamton especially have lots of old abandonned factories
To be completely honest I wouldn't visit a state/region to just go see these "rustbelt" cities/towns but if I was to head out that way I would make a point in driving through them. I think if I was a truckdriver I would definitely make a drive through these cities that people have mentioned.
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Old 12-23-2010, 06:23 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 6,019,515 times
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Quote:
To be completely honest I wouldn't visit a state/region to just go see these "rustbelt" cities/towns but if I was to head out that way I would make a point in driving through them.
It would be possible to structure a road trip hitting various "rusty" cities (or, more accuralty, places that had a lot of older industrial development and working class neigborhoods...getting away from the touchy "rust belt" moniker...)

You'd have to do your research though, before heading out, since this isnt the kind of stuff tourists go for or are pushed by the AAA or travel agents (unless its something exceptional, like Lowell, Mass).

What I do is I go to the library and read up on the states, staring with those old WPA Federal Writers Project "American Guides", which often have specific chapters on cities as well as "old road" travel itinerarys. These guides will direct you to the major industries of that day (which was the 1930s and early 1940s, usually) in a city (or even small town) as well as (sometimes) ethnic neighborhoods and local landmarks. So a very good start if one wants to seriously explore Rust Belt America, or similar places outside of the usual Rust Belt geographic definition.

I've used the WPA guides as a starting point in exploreing "rust belt" places in Indiana, Ohio, PA, WVA, upstate NY, and Connecticut.

Beyond that I use phone books (looking up old parish churches, indicating where ethnic neighborhoods might be, and bars and delicatessens or food stores), the census American Factfinder data (for latino and immigrant areas), and the internet for other stuff, say, google streetview, blogs, etc.

To do this kind of tourism or travel is very much DIY...you have to really care about what you want to see to put the effort into it...its not like booking a cruise or going to, say, Gatlinburg or Disney World.
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Old 12-24-2010, 04:10 PM
 
Location: west mich
5,740 posts, read 5,898,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
The rustbelt cities are just going through a terrible economic clunker period, but it will soon be over. People are not leaving these cities because other cities are better, but are leaving because they have to take care of families as well as themselves.
This region is beginning to level out and will soon be on an upswing. Too many great cities here that just have had a terrible economic experience.
There are only two options for these cities - either bring back manufacturing or diversify. Detroit's vacant lots are being recycled into corporate farmland. It's as though history is repeating!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
Everybody move to duluth!!!
Yep, when it turns tropical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
I have taken many pictures of gritty areas in and around Pittsburgh and McKees Rocks. To see my photo tours (and pictures of my row-house project), click on this link:
Discovering Historic Pittsburgh
Great photos & presentation, but the music is very sad imho.
I have old photos of Detroit's industrial southwest which, unfortunately, require scanning & processing before I can post them. A somewhat major undertaking, but I'd love to be able to do a presentation such as yours.
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Old 12-24-2010, 04:18 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,092 posts, read 5,483,306 times
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Rust Belt cities are cool.

It was the "rust belt" reputation that inspired me to go out of my way to drive through Youngstown, Ohio on my way home from D.C. a couple of weeks ago.
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