U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-13-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,960,068 times
Reputation: 3080

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Footballfreak View Post
I never will understand the hatred towards the suburbans. Maybe it's all the hipsters and yuppies or people thinking they're better because they don't own a car. How is living on top of everyone without any space and being at the mercy of a bus or train schedule good living? Even with gas being over $3 a gallon, a car brings in freedom. You can go and have your own set schedule.
I'm one who grew up in the burbs (for the most part anyway)
I've seen and experienced the advantages and disadvantages of living in both an Urban and a Suburban environment. But you do realize you're being just like those yuppies/hipsters (in suburban form) when you go against urban living after "not understanding" why people have so much hatred against the suburbs, right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-13-2010, 09:28 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,909 posts, read 12,166,359 times
Reputation: 5697
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
A lot of people are saying they are everywhere but whereas houses like that make up 75% of the mid to late-century stock in a city like Albuquerque, you would be hard pressed to find more than a few neighborhoods like that in the NYC suburbs.
While I won't venture a guess at what the percentage is, I can happily report that the bolded is actually quite funny considering the post World War II New York suburbs (one in particular) were pretty much the template for all suburban areas around the country AND (here the important bit) the development of the ranch style house this thread is all about:

Levittown, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
In 1949, Levitt and Sons changed focus, unveiling a new plan which it termed a "ranch" house. Larger, 32 feet (9.8 m) by 25 feet (7.6 m), and more modern, these homes were only offered for sale, with a planned price of $7,990. The ranch homes were similar to the rental properties in that they were built on concrete slabs, included an expandable attic but no garage, and were heated with hot-water radiant heating pipes. Five models were offered that were substantially identical with differences in details such as exterior color and window-placement. Again, demand was high, requiring that the purchasing process be streamlined as the assembly process had been, reaching the point that a buyer could walk through the process of selecting a house through contracting for its purchase in three minutes. This ranch model was altered in 1950 to include a carport and a built-in television. In 1951, a partially finished attic was added to the design.

Levittown in the 1950s (What, did you think the suburbs of New York City were wall to wall brick rowhouses?)
Blueprints for a Better 'Burb - NYTimes.com

So the next time someone says that the Sunbelt cities popularized suburbia, you can correct them and say "Nope. You can thank the New Yorker William Levitt aka the father of modern Suburbia."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2010, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 19,568,102 times
Reputation: 11067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Footballfreak View Post
I never will understand the hatred towards the suburbans. Maybe it's all the hipsters and yuppies or people thinking they're better because they don't own a car. How is living on top of everyone without any space and being at the mercy of a bus or train schedule good living? Even with gas being over $3 a gallon, a car brings in freedom. You can go and have your own set schedule.
All hail the almighty car and car house...I see it as garages and cars make people think they are better than pedestrians/bicyclists etc....NOT the other way around.

As I have walked and biked I've had bottles and insults hurled my way...I never knew it went the "other way" with pedestrians bombarding automobiles....ROFL....thanx for setting us straight!.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2010, 09:14 PM
 
4,811 posts, read 8,812,285 times
Reputation: 2764
Every person who chose to live in the suburbs did so by free will. Nobody held a gun to their heads. I don't know why that is such a hard concept for some. I know that some folks are gung-ho about urbanism, and that's great for those folks, but most people don't want to live downtown, and freely choose not to.
If more people wanted (demand) urbanism than it would have happened (supply). But that's simply not the case. You can clearly see where the demand was by looking at where the supply was/is. And that is in the suburbs.
I understand you want urbanism. Great for you! Find enough other people who want it (create a demand) and then it will happen (supply). But as much as you try, you can't force it down the throats of folks who don't want it. And most folks don't want it.

BTW, you can have your life. I would not want it, it's not for me. It's for you, and that's great. But different strokes for different folks. In this case, most people don't prefer your "different stroke".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
While I won't venture a guess at what the percentage is, I can happily report that the bolded is actually quite funny considering the post World War II New York suburbs (one in particular) were pretty much the template for all suburban areas around the country AND (here the important bit) the development of the ranch style house this thread is all about:
I grew up in the New York City suburbs, Westchester County, and the vast majority of neighborhoods are filled with Colonials, Cape Cods, Victorians, Federals, Dutch Colonials. The only places that you see Levittown style houses are in areas that didn't develop until very recently, the 60s, 70s and later, which makes up a fairly small proportion of the housing stock within 100 miles of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top