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Old 01-03-2011, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,049,051 times
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North Carolina:

Boone - (year round population ~14,000, plus 14,000 App State students, and at least 30,000 2nd home tourists during warm months). It's one of the most densely built towns in the state, with the entire town shoved into a deep valley at 3350ft in the Appalachian Mountains. The area around the university is quite urban in its' look, with an older 'small-town' downtown immediately north of that. Lots of zig-zaggy narrow streets and lanes, small-lot houses.

Salisbury - One of the oldest cities away from the NC coastal plain. Population around 30,000 now, precisely halfway between Charlotte and Greensboro. Several low-rise early 20th century skyscrapers, and as the downtown is on a hill, it has more of a skyline than your typical Southern city of 30,000. A nice victorian district. Ugly, ugly strip-mall hell on the outskirts though.

Elizabeth City - One of the oldest towns in the state - colonial era. Around 20,000 now, fast becoming an exurb of the Hampton Roads area in Virginia. Lots of old, dense, rowhouse-type neighborhoods, which are otherwise rare in NC.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Springfield and brookline MA
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Amherst Massachusetts and Northampton Massachusetts
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:49 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,909,254 times
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Every big city has satellite cities.

In Detroit it's Pontiac and Mount Clemens. In Chicago it's Joliet and Waukegan, In New York its White Plains and Elizabeth, NJ. In Los Angeles its Aneheim and Burbank. In Atlanta its Marietta an Peachtree City. In Philadelphia its Norristown and Candem, NJ. In Indianapolis its Greenwood and Carmel.

Mount Pilot in The Andy Griffith Show (the supposedly "big" city people in Mayberry were always talking about handling their "business" at) was a satellite city to Raleigh.
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,490 posts, read 16,176,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidals View Post
Elizabeth City - One of the oldest towns in the state - colonial era. Around 20,000 now, fast becoming an exurb of the Hampton Roads area in Virginia. Lots of old, dense, rowhouse-type neighborhoods, which are otherwise rare in NC.
Rowhouse neighborhoods in Elizabeth City? That's news! For its size, I think New Bern is the most impressive Inner Banks town, though there are many charming small hamlets all around that region.
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,049,051 times
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LOL - wellll I'm drawing on OLD memories of when I was last through there, so I might be mixing up my NE NC cities! I'll stand by the others though. New Bern - another good mention.
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Old 01-04-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: 304
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My whole state is made up of "micro cities"

West Virginia---- Charleston, Huntington, Morgantown, Wheeling, Parkersburg, Clarkesburg, Fairmont, Beckley, ect...........
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Old 01-04-2011, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Northfield, MN
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Youngstown Ohio seems to fit that description pretty well
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Old 01-04-2011, 09:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
I guess that'd work.

But, what I was looking for, is a small city with different neighborhoods, a built-up downtown, and a unique culture.
Hibbing, MN, Dubuque, IA
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Old 01-06-2011, 05:19 PM
 
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Yea in Minnesota you got Hibbing, Virginia, Grand Rapids, Bemidji, Mankato, Winona, and probably more.

Duluth is also exceptionally large for its size but there's historical reasons for that as is well discussed in the Duluth forum.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:16 PM
 
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Auburn, NY; Ithaca, NY; Burlington, VT; etc.
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