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Old 12-19-2010, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
1,604 posts, read 936,346 times
Reputation: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Yes most of Indiana, most of Michigan and all of Ohio are in eastern time. This is not how it is supposed to be however, as when the time zones were created all of Indiana and all of Michigan were central time as well. Part of western Ohio also was central. THis was changed in the first part of the 20th century for shipping and railroad reasons. The east coast bosses wanted it this way. If you get an old atlas from the early 20th century it clearly shows these areas as central time. Ohio is the only midwest state that should have any part of it in eastern time. The reason there is daylight till after 10pm in Michigan every summer is because the state is in the wrong time zone. A few years back I was in Boston and called my wife back home in Michigan one morning. The sun was up and it was daylight out there, but back home in Michigan it was still pitch black. Very strange to me that we could possibly be in the same zone as Boston 900 miles to the east, but it is. For some reason there are still alot of people who live in Michigan that erroneosly believe we ARE in the central time zone. I guess that is what seems logical to most people, but logical and reality are sometimes very different.
I think sunset in Michigan during the summer is more like 9:15-9:30 or so, unless maybe you're in the western Upper Peninsula. Regardless, time zones typically cover about an hour's worth of sunrises and sunsets, so there's going to be variability. If most Michigan was in the central time zone, if you called somebody in central Nebraska, for example, you would have the same problem.
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Old 12-19-2010, 01:22 PM
 
Location: St. Louie
732 posts, read 794,022 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Umm, Pittsburgh is not an East Coast city, so that leaves the Midwest unless you've unearthed a new geographic region. Louisville and Cincinnati are often referred to as gateways to The Midwest (from the South) and are not thought of as Southern cities, so yet another new geographic region??? And where do you suppose Cleveland is in all of this??
Pittsburgh is a Northeastern city. Definitely not Midwestern.
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Old 12-19-2010, 02:44 PM
 
12,173 posts, read 11,890,042 times
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Pittsburgh might be clinging to the Northeastern edge geographically but in terms of identity is clearly Midwestern.
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Old 12-19-2010, 03:52 PM
 
Location: St. Louie
732 posts, read 794,022 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Pittsburgh might be clinging to the Northeastern edge geographically but in terms of identity is clearly Midwestern.
Rustbelt? Yes
Midwest? No
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Old 12-19-2010, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,385 posts, read 1,196,999 times
Reputation: 2088
Pittsburgh is interior northeast, like Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, etc. Louisville isn't part of the Midwest either, it's in the south.
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:14 PM
 
933 posts, read 956,136 times
Reputation: 522
Wow.. The only place that doesn't recognize Nebraska (or other great plains states) as part of the midwest is here on city-data.

Go figure..

That's okay with me though. Nebraska has a very good economy and is growing moderatly, but healthy-like. Has 10 fortune 1000 companies headquartered there in a wide variety of industries. Cost of living is very low and has one mid/large metro in Omaha and another just 23 miles of fields from another in Lincoln where a total population of 1.185 million exists (was 1,050,000 but is growing 115,000 - 140,000 this decade [obviously official number released in march]).

Call it great plains, call it west, call it central or call it midwest. All that matters is it is a state on the rise in all facets.
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:21 PM
 
6,225 posts, read 5,405,156 times
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I've always seen the midwest as anywhere from Youngstown to a little past the Missouri River, and from the Upper Peninsula to the Ohio. Pittsburgh always seemed "eastern" even though it's a rust belt city like Cleveland.
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:46 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
4,354 posts, read 4,921,339 times
Reputation: 2903
Default Interesting places to visit in the Midwest

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssnydo View Post
Hi everybody-

I have lived in the western US my whole life, currently in Colorado. I have family in the midwest and therefore have spent a good amount of time out there and may want to move there in the near future. I am not a bleeding-heart liberal (in fact I am a happy owner of several firearms) but would like to live somewhere accepting of different types of friendly people, maybe a a music scene, good-looking girls would be a plus, and maybe a younger population. I'm an architecture student and enjoy going out, having fun, and meeting people.

I've been to Chicago and upper Illinois near Wisconsin, St. Louis, the Ozarks, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Are there any other cities or towns anybody can recommend that would be a fun place for a young man to visit and potentially to live? I've heard Madison, WI is cool, and Dubuque, IA looks beautiful.

Thanks for any suggestions.
Here are a few suggestions for Ohio.

Ohio

Cleveland: Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Art Museums, Fountain Square, Metroparks Zoo, Aquarium, Orchestra, Great Lakes Science Museum
Canton: Football Hall of Fame
Cincinnati: Union Terminal, Art Museum, Underground Railroad, Aquarium
Sandusky: Cedar Point Amusement Park, Lake Erie Islands nearby
Hocking Hills
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 7,138,664 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Hocking Hills
I'm so glad you are familiar with this!

The Old Man's Cave area in particular is fantastic.
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Old 12-20-2010, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 1,235,451 times
Reputation: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Gary, East St. Louis, Flint, and Youngstown are all interesting places to visit.
yeah if you want a ghetto tour. XD
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