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Old 12-19-2010, 08:48 PM
 
29 posts, read 52,990 times
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I'm graduating from college this year and starting a job search. Problem is, I'm wide open as to where I want to live, which makes it difficult to start. I've lived in Chicago and Cincinatti and liked both, and am looking in those cities, but I don't want to rule out other places.

Here's what I'd ideally like:

-I'm 23, so a city with a sizable population of young people
-preferably a city, but it doesn't have to be a huge city. Maybe 300k-ish and up
-I don't really like the cold, but I can handle it. I've lived my whole life in the midwest, and I hate the harsh winters here.
-preferably within a day or so's drive of the midwest, where my family is (indiana) This is not totally necessary, it would just be nice.
-I'd like a city that was more dense and walkable rather than sprawling
-More left leaning politically. But I'd prefer a place with political diversity over a uniformly liberal place
-close to outdoor recreational opportunities and has a lot of green spaces
-a place where people are more down to earth and not pretentious

so I know that's a kind of long list and I'll have to settle on some of those points, and obviously I'll be constricted by where I can find a job, but does anyone have any suggestions for me to think about?
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:58 AM
 
726 posts, read 1,871,337 times
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Have you ever visited Denver? Milder weather and seems to meet all your other criteria.
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:19 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geegollygosh View Post
I'm graduating from college this year and starting a job search. Problem is, I'm wide open as to where I want to live, which makes it difficult to start. I've lived in Chicago and Cincinatti and liked both, and am looking in those cities, but I don't want to rule out other places.

Here's what I'd ideally like:

-I'm 23, so a city with a sizable population of young people
-preferably a city, but it doesn't have to be a huge city. Maybe 300k-ish and up
-I don't really like the cold, but I can handle it. I've lived my whole life in the midwest, and I hate the harsh winters here.
-preferably within a day or so's drive of the midwest, where my family is (indiana) This is not totally necessary, it would just be nice.
-I'd like a city that was more dense and walkable rather than sprawling
-More left leaning politically. But I'd prefer a place with political diversity over a uniformly liberal place
-close to outdoor recreational opportunities and has a lot of green spaces
-a place where people are more down to earth and not pretentious

so I know that's a kind of long list and I'll have to settle on some of those points, and obviously I'll be constricted by where I can find a job, but does anyone have any suggestions for me to think about?

In this day and age one has to consider where one can find a job and in your situation build a resume/establish a career track. In terms of a city with a sizable young/single population, a very low unemployment rate (5.8%), a milder four season climate than the Midwest, dense and walkable with great public transit, a reasonable distance from Indiana (8-10 hours), left leaning/yet diverse and lots of green space/recreation.... I would say Washington DC should top your list. The only trade-off is that there is some pretentiousness but not to the degree where you would feel alone. The city is a melting pot of people from all over the country (and the world) and you'll find plenty of people you'll have things in common with. Check out Northwest DC neighborhoods like Dupont Circle, Adams Morgan and Cleveland Park or the Capitol Hill/Eastern Market neighborhoods on the SE side.
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:31 AM
 
704 posts, read 1,504,471 times
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I'd say Denver or Nashville.

- Cold winter: it's colder in Denver than Nashville, but both cities are more mild than what you're getting in the midwest this time of year.

- Size: Nashville is a little bigger than Denver, but both cities and even metros are actually relatively mid-sized and quite manageable. You probably won't feel overwhelmed in either city.

- Politics: Both cities are more moderate-to-liberal in the city itself, and both have mostly very conservative suburbs. So each metro area is politically diverse, and you'll meet a lot of conservatives and liberals in each city.

- Green spaces/outdoors: both cities have tremendous outdoor recreational opportunities. Denver is right next to the Rocky Mountains and Nashville did an incredible job integrating parks--like Radnor State Park--throughout the area. Easily two of the best cities in the country for outdoor enthusiasts. You also have a lot of fishing/hiking/camping/hunting, etc. within reasonable distance of both cities, and people in those cities partake in all of those activities with zeal.

- Young people: Both cities are very popular among young families and to a lesser extent, young singles. But both have a young, active population.

- Down-to-earth: Denver is one of the most grounded places you'll visit. People wear jeans to church, concerts, etc. and they are generally very easy-going. I can't say much about Nashville in that respect.

Other than that, Nashville is obviously a must easier drive home than Denver, but Denver's airport is one of the biggest in the country and flights are abundant.
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Old 12-20-2010, 11:11 AM
 
29 posts, read 52,990 times
Reputation: 19
Thanks everyone!

I hadn't really considered Denver. I visited once, but I ended up staying out in the suburbs the whole time visiting someone, so I don't think I really got a feel for the city.

I have visited DC a couple times, and didn't really feel like it was very friendly but my visits were always pretty rushed and mostly confined to the downtown areas, so that might be why.

I have considered Nashville and some of the other medium and small cities mostly in Tennessee and North Carolina.

Job market is obviously important, and will be the final decider in where I end up, but for now I'm just considering where I want to go first so I can look at the job markets in those places. It's just a little overwhelming to be doing a job search without having any strong preferences of what areas I should be looking in.

ETA: I guess another criteria is that I like cities that feel a little older. I've spent most of my life living in old dying industrial towns, and while I'm not looking for that, cities that are all new and shiny feel cold and unfriendly to me.

Last edited by geegollygosh; 12-20-2010 at 11:23 AM..
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Old 12-21-2010, 02:08 PM
 
56,731 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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What about Lexington or Louisville KY? Perhaps Knoxville TN....
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Old 12-21-2010, 04:47 PM
 
5,707 posts, read 8,773,655 times
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Knoxville is worth considering. There's sprawl here but it's not like you have to go out and visit it every day. Well unless you get a job in the burbs but a reverse commute isn't bad.

Politics is very diverse. The city is moderate to slightly liberal the county fairly conservative.

Everything else fits your list.
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:19 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
Reputation: 19655
Quote:
Originally Posted by geegollygosh View Post
ETA: I guess another criteria is that I like cities that feel a little older. I've spent most of my life living in old dying industrial towns, and while I'm not looking for that, cities that are all new and shiny feel cold and unfriendly to me.
Given that extra criteria I think you should also consider Boston. It's a beautiful city that blends modern with historic quite well. It'd be pretty cool to live and work amongst all of the historical sites/buildings. The city has a lower unemployment rate than most big cities right now (7.0%) and a large young professional population.
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Old 12-23-2010, 08:07 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
908 posts, read 1,567,903 times
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Check out Pittsburgh:

Pittsburgh Hotels, Attractions & Vacation Packages : Pittsburgh PA CVB
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