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Old 12-22-2010, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,989,946 times
Reputation: 5397

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
As Dannyy said : it's not important at all.
You must learn your maths better.

It's more than 27 million people added, the third best decade of the US demographically.It's the same number as the baby boom era ! It's just HUGE !
Other industrialized countries are jealous about this.

Look at this article if you like stats
2010 Census: South and West Advance (Without California) | Newgeography.com
I must learn my maths better?
Where was my math wrong?

If someplace has 100 people and added 50 more compared to another place that has 10,000 people and adds 100, where is the more impressive growth?

Adding more people isn't always impressive. Adding more people along with the same percentage of growth in industry is impressive.

I live in Florida and while it has been one of the top growth areas we need to add more industry here to go along with it.
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Northridge, Los Angeles, CA
2,685 posts, read 6,378,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
Have you seen what the rapid growth in Australia has done? No doubt the US can support much more, and I am not worried anytime soon. But Australia is home to 22.5 million, and they are already talking about desalination.
Well, Australia and the United States have vastly geographic makeups with different water needs. Australia is a pretty arid continent, with something like 80%+ of the area being taken up by the outback, and another 10% being inhospitable rainforest in Queensland and Northern Australia (around Darwin). There's only a small area that could be settled, and that is mostly around the coast. However, I will say that some of the world's largest underwater basins are in Australia, they are being used more quickly than they are being replenished (especially by grazers and farmers).

The United States, on the other hand, has the same problem but only in the Western United States (though much smaller in scale). Water isn't such a pressing issue in the densely populated Northeast and Midwest due to the regular rainfall, the presence of many aquifers, and the Great Lakes. Interestingly enough, even if you took the Western US by itself (1/3 the US land area), it would still have a larger population than Australia with a higher growth rate (71 million at 13.8% growth vs. 22 million at 13.1% growth)

Despite all this, humans have a resiliency to survive anywhere. Quality of life is another issue, but I think we'll be fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
I live in Florida and while it has been one of the top growth areas we need to add more industry here to go along with it.
I think the slow down growth should be a time where the US updates it's industry and infrastructure for the 21st century, especially in some of the higher growth states. I agree with you wholeheartedly.
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,197 posts, read 31,574,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Actually, the South has its haves and have-nots too. Texas and the south Atlantic states are where the lion's share of population growth has been. Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi all grew at rates below the national average. Of course, Louisiana is understandable (Hurricane Katrina), but not the other three states.
Alabama's growth seems to be happening in certain areas. For example, if you drive through Baldwin County you'll see new subdivisions, apartment complexes, and shopping centers being built everywhere, it has exploded in growth in the last decade. On the other hand, some of the rural counties in the center of the state (the black belt) seem to be stagnant.
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:04 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,770 posts, read 8,821,706 times
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Couple of projections: Florida will easily overtake New York in the 2020 census as most populous state #3.
Georgia and North Carolina will continue to battle it out and will both approach 10.5 to 11 million (wow!!).
Arizona and Washington state will probably approach the 8 million mark.
Tennessee will leapfrog both Massachusetts and Indiana to reach about 7 million plus or minus.
North Dakota will be the only state never to top 1 million. lol
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Old 12-23-2010, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Northridge, Los Angeles, CA
2,685 posts, read 6,378,834 times
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If anyone is interested in projections, US News released some (although I get the impression that the statistics they cite are a bit dated. The census bureau needs a new model)

How the Census reshapes government - USATODAY.com

United States 2030: 363,584,435

On average, each representative (if kept at 435) will represent 835,826 people per district.

The rest of it seems sort of interesting, because it relies on a whole list of assumptions such as:
1) Sunbelt will always continue to grow (even that's becoming less and less of the case IE: Florida, Nevada, and Arizona have had at least one year of more people moving out than in)
2) International migration will be the same as today and not taper off (again, becoming less and less of the case due to the state of the US economy)
3) Economic conditions remain relatively stable (yeah, as we all know, things can change within a year or two)

It will be interesting to watch over the next few years to see how correct these projections are.
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Old 12-23-2010, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,452,954 times
Reputation: 1440
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Couple of projections: Florida will easily overtake New York in the 2020 census as most populous state #3.
Georgia and North Carolina will continue to battle it out and will both approach 10.5 to 11 million (wow!!).
Arizona and Washington state will probably approach the 8 million mark.
Tennessee will leapfrog both Massachusetts and Indiana to reach about 7 million plus or minus.
North Dakota will be the only state never to top 1 million. lol
For Florida it's certainly possible, if the economy recovers
And you shouldn't make fun of North Dakota, this state's population growth is coming back : low unemployment, more diverse economy (oil, gas, wind power, high-tech with Microsoft).I imagine a great decade for this state.
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Old 12-23-2010, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Southwest Michigan/Miami Beach Miami
1,949 posts, read 2,761,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
North Dakota will be the only state never to top 1 million. lol
And Wyoming. . lol
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Old 12-23-2010, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,186 posts, read 10,325,696 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
For Florida it's certainly possible, if the economy recovers
And you shouldn't make fun of North Dakota, this state's population growth is coming back : low unemployment, more diverse economy (oil, gas, wind power, high-tech with Microsoft).I imagine a great decade for this state.
Its recovering don't worry
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