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Old 01-21-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,436,914 times
Reputation: 1440

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Didn't you have this same argument, just in a different thread?
Oh no it's just reality.In 2 years you'll see the effects in population migration and jon growth.
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Old 01-21-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,260 posts, read 5,480,306 times
Reputation: 4594
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
Oh no it's just reality.In 2 years you'll see the effects in population migration and jon growth.
Yes, yes. I forgot about your prognosticating abilities
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Old 01-21-2011, 03:52 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 12 days ago)
 
48,110 posts, read 45,484,200 times
Reputation: 15333
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
This depends on the area of the Northeast or Midwest you are living in though. My area is just as affordable as many, if not most areas in the South. So, the Northeast being expensive is more of a Bos-Wash corridor thing.

Unemployment is also lower in many metros in those region in comparison to the South or West too.

Unemployment Rates for Metropolitan Areas
I can see that, with the exception of Detroit, some of the larger Midwestern metros have unemployment rates below the national average.

Omaha metro: 4.6%
Mpls-St.Paul metro: 6.5%
Milwaukee metro: 7.5%
Columbus, OH metro: 8%
Cleveland metro: 8.5%
Indianapolis metro: 8.7%
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Old 01-21-2011, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,317,013 times
Reputation: 4270
Most of those aren't one-horse towns either. E.g. MSP is not a "one-horse town" and even though it's heavy in agriculture, it is very diverse in other industries as well; such as finance/banking, insurance, healthcare, retail and wholesale foods.
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Old 01-22-2011, 06:55 PM
 
4,811 posts, read 8,813,928 times
Reputation: 2764
You can all laugh at California - we don't mind. But try and remember, California is the eight largest economy in the world. We pick up the slackers in the other 49 states - and don't complain. And by the way, our weather's great.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,299 posts, read 3,397,810 times
Reputation: 2035
I live in NJ and taxes are a small part of why I want to move out. The cost of living in the Northeast in general is pricing out young families. $400-500k for a starter home that'll probably depreciate... no thank you. I love living in NJ, but I don't think I could afford to raise a family here.
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Old 01-24-2011, 06:49 PM
 
551 posts, read 996,858 times
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I think that the high tax states should learn to use their funds more efficiently. Like cut or edit programs that aren't working and doing as they are intended, they need to do benchmarking. However, I still think that things like social services, historical preservation, enviornmental protection, and mass transit still need to be there and that is why I still think many people find places like New York City desirable (although they are usually rich so higher taxes don't concern them as much). The low tax states don't offer those things very much, but that doesn't mean that those things that cause the tax rate to be high are bad. Such as salaries for subway train drivers and pensions for teachers and cops. Are those things bad? I don't think they are bad but places like NYC should keep those things that make them great but simply redo their taxes to get the same or better quality things for less cost on tax payers. I think a lot of the tax burden comes from inefficiency, not necessarily the programs or their intentions being bad in and of themselves. If the high tax states can just use their funds better, they can have better quality services and still keep middle class families from moving away.
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Old 01-29-2011, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,800,777 times
Reputation: 4047
Tax News from Yahoo! Finance
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:31 PM
 
56,613 posts, read 80,910,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
Very misleading article, as NY varies in terms of cost of living to the point where some metros in Upstate NY and in Florida are about the same in cost of living overall. Some might actually be lower in Upstate NY than some metros in Florida.
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Old 01-31-2011, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,800,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Very misleading article, as NY varies in terms of cost of living to the point where some metros in Upstate NY and in Florida are about the same in cost of living overall. Some might actually be lower in Upstate NY than some metros in Florida.
That's not true. I personally know people who are moving because of high taxes, in fact my cousin in San Jose is the next addition to this "moved because of high taxes" he can stay out in San Jose and be miserable like he described on the phone yesterday or he can level off two mortgages, get a high paying job, and have a better family environment right now elsewhere. He's contemplating the idea right now, he moved to California in 1999, and its been 12 years for him (will be in March) and at first he was exceptionally happy, but he had to go through 3 jobs in 1.5 years, has two homes he has to pay for, and he cant take the expenses anymore, last I saw him, he was stressed out like no other to the point where making phone calls to him was outrageously hard, he had black lining around his eyes due to the lack of sleep, and a lot of peoples lives have been like that since the recession. He can stay where he is and be stressed, or he can move, and he's highly considering that, and he has an exceptionally high salary too and even then, its just not enough for him to want to stick around. People go where their families can be better off, it's not a "high tax vs low tax" thing. It's a "where am I better off?" thing. He'll be going to Seattle, from what he's decided upon.

And there are many people that go through that, lets say population gains in any high tax state stays the same year after year, but say in 2007, 5,000 people moved out do to high taxes, in 2008, it was 7,000 people and in 2010 it was 12,000 people, again that is a larger net loss.

And New York shows that with its outmigration pattern.
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