U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-24-2010, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Traveling again
2,535 posts, read 1,969,059 times
Reputation: 6065

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
Would the South or Midwest be more religious? And would any parts of the US be less than 50% Christian?
IMO the states that are more religious are Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma (midwest); Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas (south). So the traditional south would be the most.

The less than 50% IMO (with the exception of the Amish) would be the northern states of Rhode Island, New Hamp, Conn, Mass, New York, Penn, Michigan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-24-2010, 10:44 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,423,939 times
Reputation: 6703
The OP wasn't suggesting this, but for what it's worth keep in mind that Christian does not mean socially conservative; I often see that viewpoint on these forums. Here in Minneapolis there's a clear religious influence on things (although people mostly keep it to themselves; no one has ever asked if/where I go to church, for example), but for the most part around here it's about as far from social conservative as you can get. Churches here are more interested in addressing social issues like poverty or hunger than they are about gay marriage, although that, too, is a hot topic. Rainbow flags fly from most of the churches in our part of the city, and I know at least one neighborhood church has stopped signing marriage certificates until gay marriage is legalized. I'm not religious and don't go to church, but have attended forums and other events sponsored by local churches, as well as have worked with church members and clergy in shared community iniatives. I really value the work they do for the community, and think it's wonderful to have a place where people can come together to push for what, in our local case, tends to be a very progressive social agenda. Obviously there are some more stereotypical social conservative Christians around here, too, but they are far less visible in the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 10:48 AM
 
1,830 posts, read 3,230,799 times
Reputation: 533
An interesting map that shows no religious identity...



Source: Gallup
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,244,369 times
Reputation: 1802
The Gallup map is quite interesting and supports the notion that the West & New England are less religious. The comment about the upper Midwest is also very revealing. Certain churches tend to be quiet\ tolerant on social issues and just go about doing good things for communities; Lutherans & Episcopalians for example.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 03:46 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,007,201 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by xenokc View Post
As a heathen infidel who lives in the Midwest (KC, from STL) and having been essentially everywhere around the US, I'd have to say that the South is clearly the most fundie religious. Is astonishing the number of Jesus billboards you see in the South, especially Georgia and Northern Florida.

Midwest religious people tend to keep it to themselves (at least in the cities) but there might be a higher % of Xians than in the 'new economy' cities. I do think the East Coast is more traditionally contact religious (not fundie) than the Midwest though. I was walking around downtown Brooklyn a few years ago and a street preacher was at it... the surprising thing was that many stopped to listen. My brother lives in NYC and 'found' religion there, though he is more into theology than religion.

Of the Jews that I know in KC, none practice it. There seem to be more pagans, wiccans and contemporary unitarian types in the KC core, but for the most part, the city core and educated burbs aren't nearly as fundie religious as the rest of MO/KS. Southern MO may as well be included in the South. It's very fundamentalist.
What about all the religious pro-life billboards South of St. Louis?? I've never seen so many in my life. In fact, I've never seen any pro-life billboards outside of that stretch of I-55 (From Cape Girardeau to South St. Louis) That's firmly in the Midwest.

Last edited by Smtchll; 12-24-2010 at 03:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,571,893 times
Reputation: 3235
I see a lot of pro-life billboards here in Minnesota. I think it's the Catholic presence in the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,524,743 times
Reputation: 737
In my opinion...

Most Christian: An L-shaped region stretching from North Dakota to Texas to Georgia.

Least Christian: New England, the West Coast, and other Intermountain West states like Nevada and Colorado (as shown above).

Oh, and Kansas is certainly overly religious. At least the western and central part of it is; I dunno about the eastern part. I drive through KS going between CO and OK a lot and the amount of Jesus / pro-life billboards... Good lord.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 09:25 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,413 posts, read 7,712,582 times
Reputation: 3054
It's a tie between the South-Central states of Oklahoma and Arkansas. If it weren't for southern Texas (Texico)....Texas would be included as well. All other parts of Texas resemble the strong Evangelicalism found throughout Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Louisiana would be included if it were not for the strong French-Catholic influence in southern LA. Northern Louisiana is as firmly Evangelical as the aforementioned states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Traveling again
2,535 posts, read 1,969,059 times
Reputation: 6065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
It's a tie between the South-Central states of Oklahoma and Arkansas. If it weren't for southern Texas (Texico)....Texas would be included as well. All other parts of Texas resemble the strong Evangelicalism found throughout Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Louisiana would be included if it were not for the strong French-Catholic influence in southern LA. Northern Louisiana is as firmly Evangelical as the aforementioned states.
I'd lean more towards Oklahoma than Arkansas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,509 posts, read 7,318,708 times
Reputation: 2023
I'm sure Dearborn, MI is less than 50% Christian. But even if it isn't, its one of the least(if not the least) Christian place in this country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top