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Old 03-01-2011, 08:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA7cities View Post
I usually can tell if they are southern or not but it is sometimes hard to pinpoint which part of the south. Some pronunciations where Im from (Norfolk/Va Beach Virginia) would be....

Maryland = Mayerlen, May-ah-lan
Ball & Bald = Baw
Car= cah
Four= fowa
where, wear= wheya
Nothing= nuntin
Party= Pawty or potty
go on ahead= gon' head
Carry your= care yo
looks like= lookin' lyka
Had a roommate in college from Portsmouth, VA. For him, Coca Cola = CoCola, insurance was pronounced INsurance, liquor was licka, I think = I reckon, Norfolk = Nawfk.
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Old 03-01-2011, 09:10 PM
 
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There are several southern accents.

In Appalachian areas, bear, care, hair, fair, wear, sometimes are pronounced bahr, cahr, hahr, fahr, wahr.
But in Richmond VA, for instance, they are traditionally pronounced bye-uh, cye-uh, hye-uh, fye-uh, wye-uh - especially so if those words come at the end of a sentence, causing the speaker to draw them out. (Although this is less true of the younger generation, who in recent years tend to adopt "rhotic" Appalachian type accents instead, pronouncing all their "R's" - this may be due to their listening to country music, since Nashville recording artists tend to have Appalachian accents).

Traditionally, Southern coastal accents have been "non-rhotic" meaning the "R" is left off of unstressed syllables (although coastal Southerners generally DO pronounce R's in stressed syllables - unlike some parts of the world where "R's" are omitted in both stressed AND unstresed syllables - such as England, New England - and formerly parts of eastern Tidewater Virginia).

Southern Appalachian accents by contrast are "rhotic" meaning the "R" is always pronounced, but the dipthong "ah-ee" becomes just "ah".

Southerners often say "cain't" for "can't". Evangelist Billy Graham would even say "cain't" when preaching sermons.

Many of the younger generation of southerners have softened, or completely lost their accents - due to more exposure to the mass media, broadcasting, etc.

You can hear many examples of southern speech on "You Tube". For a very exaggerated Appalachian accent, listen to the early Andy Griffith comedy monologues, or else the first-year episodes of his TV series (starting the second year, he toned it down a lot).

Last edited by slowlane3; 03-01-2011 at 09:37 PM..
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Old 03-02-2011, 03:10 AM
 
Location: Southeastern Tennessee
711 posts, read 977,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
There are several southern accents.

In Appalachian areas, bear, care, hair, fair, wear, sometimes are pronounced bahr, cahr, hahr, fahr, wahr.
But in Richmond VA, for instance, they are traditionally pronounced bye-uh, cye-uh, hye-uh, fye-uh, wye-uh - especially so if those words come at the end of a sentence, causing the speaker to draw them out. (Although this is less true of the younger generation, who in recent years tend to adopt "rhotic" Appalachian type accents instead, pronouncing all their "R's" - this may be due to their listening to country music, since Nashville recording artists tend to have Appalachian accents).

Traditionally, Southern coastal accents have been "non-rhotic" meaning the "R" is left off of unstressed syllables (although coastal Southerners generally DO pronounce R's in stressed syllables - unlike some parts of the world where "R's" are omitted in both stressed AND unstresed syllables - such as England, New England - and formerly parts of eastern Tidewater Virginia).

Southern Appalachian accents by contrast are "rhotic" meaning the "R" is always pronounced, but the dipthong "ah-ee" becomes just "ah".

Southerners often say "cain't" for "can't". Evangelist Billy Graham would even say "cain't" when preaching sermons.

Many of the younger generation of southerners have softened, or completely lost their accents - due to more exposure to the mass media, broadcasting, etc.

You can hear many examples of southern speech on "You Tube". For a very exaggerated Appalachian accent, listen to the early Andy Griffith comedy monologues, or else the first-year episodes of his TV series (starting the second year, he toned it down a lot).
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Old 03-02-2011, 11:47 AM
 
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Southern accents have also evolved over the years. Some elderly southerners resemble Brooklynese - they say "woik" "foist" "thoid" and "boid" ---- for "work" "first" "third" and "bird". You can hear this accent sometimes on old blues singer recordings - or old Amos and Andy shows. Some older southerners even today (both white and black), have this accent.
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Old 03-02-2011, 11:19 PM
 
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"Git" is not the same word as "get." "Git" is an command to depart from the speaker's presence usually in haste. "Get" means to acquite something just as it does in the rest of the English speaking world. Perhaps "get" sounds like "git" to someone who isn't familiar with the dialect and accent, but in context the words mean somethign completely different.
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:15 AM
 
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Accents change with time. Dropping R’s is not really a Southern thing any more, unless you’re African-American or really old.

Things Southerners still say: nekkid, INsurance (Sometimes I hear this on TV commercials voiced by apparent non-Southerners.), TEE-vee, THANKSgiving (I don’t even understand why anybody would stress “giving”—think about how you say almsgiving and giftgiving.), y’all, generally dropping the -erns from directions when referring to parts of a state (Some northern states, such as Michigan, do this, too.), reckon (especially outside of major cities), fixing to (even within major cities), and many others.
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,974 posts, read 3,453,869 times
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"Awww" for the word "All" is a key component of what I find to be a Southern/Country accent.

Ironically we were just in another thread discussing whose accent was more Southern between Chicago or DC. Chicago (blacks at least) undoubtedly say "Awww y'all" or "Aww" for the word "All", unlike DC.
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,296 posts, read 1,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
"Awww" for the word "All" is a key component of what I find to be a Southern/Country accent.

Ironically we were just in another thread discussing whose accent was more Southern between Chicago or DC. Chicago (blacks at least) undoubtedly say "Awww y'all" or "Aww" for the word "All", unlike DC.
DC/MD blacks' Southern accents are unique. "Muurland" for Maryland is a good example. In Baltimore, "dug" for "dog." "Curry" for "carry." Instead of saying "aww y'all" like blacks in Chicago (the blacks that have a southern accent) , MD/DC blacks say "ahhh yah."

Blacks in MD/DC (native ones) almost all have a southern accent, a unique one albeit. Unlike Chicago, where you have some blacks with a southern accent, some with a traditional Midwestern/Chicago accent, and some with a northeastern accent.

0% of whites in Chicago have a southern accent. It's all the Midwestern/Chicago accent. For native whites in DC/MD, it's a pretty good mix between southern, neutral, and some northeastern accents.
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Had a roommate in college from Portsmouth, VA. For him, Coca Cola = CoCola, insurance was pronounced INsurance, liquor was licka, I think = I reckon, Norfolk = Nawfk.
And Portsmouth = Porchmuth
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Old 08-05-2018, 10:21 AM
 
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“Hidy,” a hybrid of “hi” and “howdy,” is a pretty common greeting, especially in rural areas.
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