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Old 12-30-2010, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 4,132,815 times
Reputation: 1396

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
We're talking about two very different things. I was saying that yes Chicago has definitely built a lot of condo and residential towers especially in South Loop this past decade. But I was also saying that Chicago has built way more office buildings than it has residential buildings in the last decade. And Chicago only built those office buildings off demand because it needed to do that, where the office vacancy rates for last decade showed Chicago had to build more to keep up with expansions in businesses or new businesses altogether moving into the Loop.

As for residential, I agree. Chicago is like Miami there, it has been on a strong focus to infill more and to infill faster, and it built those in speculation, the whole "if we build some attractive towers, with lower costs, in a desirable area of the city, more people will come here and will supply a larger hosuing boom!'. That mentality is just dumb, and areas that have done that on a larger scale like the entire city where almost all the buildings built in the city were residential built off speculation, like Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and others they haven't been having a great time during this recession at all. And those residential towers are sitting empty, vacant, not used... that's the sad reality of it all.

Skyscrapers Built From 2000-2010:
New York City = 517
Chicago = 203
Miami = 135
Houston = 74
Atlanta = 73
Las Vegas = 68
San Francisco = 49
Los Angeles = 27

Miami & Las Vegas look impressive don't they given their size. But all those skyscrapers built, how many of those from either city do you think were actually for office or business use? Not many of them were.

Majority of the ones built in Miami & Las Vegas were for residential use. Majority for New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, & Houston were for office and business use with a smaller share in residential.

Los Angeles & Atlanta were about even in residential & business or office use skyscrapers.
It's pretty low for Houston no ? Miami is impressive
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Old 12-30-2010, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,180 posts, read 4,957,401 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
It's pretty low for Houston no ? Miami is impressive
No Houston is moderately leaning on high (As in it built an impressive amount for its size). Think about the size difference of these cities. Houston at the start of the last decade was only 4.6 Million people in its metropolitan area and grew to become 6.1 Million. Atlanta was in the same position as Houston. So both Atlanta & Houston pulled their weight and beyond compared to peers. You'll notice Dallas (Which in its Metropolitan Area is comparable sized to Houston & Atlanta) isn't on the list because it added far less than Los Angeles in the last decade. It added 22 skyscrapers over 12 stories. Fort Worth added a decent number but nothing too high.

Chicago & New York City as you recall are both known for having the largest skylines in the country by far. The numbers they added are to be expected of them both. I never expected anything less from them.

Now the most impressive of the bunch are Las Vegas & Miami. Las Vegas's Metropolitan Area hasn't even reached 2 Million people yet and it added 68 skyscrapers in the last decade alone. That is double the number that Tampa actually has altogether and Tampa is a much larger Metropolitan Area than Las Vegas. Miami a metropolitan area that is comparable in size to Atlanta added an impressive amount for its size, but it added them mostly out of speculation, which is why its housing crisis is a major setback to its economy. Miami built way to much and cant sell out everything it built. Las Vegas too. Both Las Vegas & Miami overbuilt on skyscrapers, they built more than they needed too and their economies are partially suffering because of that.

Los Angeles for the 2nd largest city and metropolitan area was less than I was hoping for. But Los Angeles hasn't ever really been known for going through any insanely fast skyscraper boom in its history like the way New York City, Chicago, Houston (1970's & 1980's), Atlanta, Miami, & Dallas (same time period as Houston) have. Especially Chicago & New York City.
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Old 12-30-2010, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 4,132,815 times
Reputation: 1396
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
No Houston is moderately leaning on high (As in it built an impressive amount for its size). Think about the size difference of these cities. Houston at the start of the last decade was only 4.6 Million people in its metropolitan area and grew to become 6.1 Million. Atlanta was in the same position as Houston. So both Atlanta & Houston pulled their weight and beyond compared to peers. You'll notice Dallas (Which in its Metropolitan Area is comparable sized to Houston & Atlanta) isn't on the list because it added far less than Los Angeles in the last decade. It added 22 skyscrapers over 12 stories. Fort Worth added a decent number but nothing too high.

Chicago & New York City as you recall are both known for having the largest skylines in the country by far. The numbers they added are to be expected of them both. I never expected anything less from them.

Now the most impressive of the bunch are Las Vegas & Miami. Las Vegas's Metropolitan Area hasn't even reached 2 Million people yet and it added 68 skyscrapers in the last decade alone. That is double the number that Tampa actually has altogether and Tampa is a much larger Metropolitan Area than Las Vegas. Miami a metropolitan area that is comparable in size to Atlanta added an impressive amount for its size, but it added them mostly out of speculation, which is why its housing crisis is a major setback to its economy. Miami built way to much and cant sell out everything it built. Las Vegas too. Both Las Vegas & Miami overbuilt on skyscrapers, they built more than they needed too and their economies are partially suffering because of that.

Los Angeles for the 2nd largest city and metropolitan area was less than I was hoping for. But Los Angeles hasn't ever really been known for going through any insanely fast skyscraper boom in its history like the way New York City, Chicago, Houston (1970's & 1980's), Atlanta, Miami, & Dallas (same time period as Houston) have. Especially Chicago & New York City.
It's really surprising for LA, a large city as LA should be in the top 5 ^^
I guess Houston did well, but I expect more for this decade.
Sunbelt cities are ambitious, I wonder why no sunbelt city wants to build the tallest skyscraper in the US, just to say "Chicago and NYC are over, it's there no lol".
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Old 12-30-2010, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 4,132,815 times
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Oh, and for the OP : Moscow has the best skyline in Europe now

http://s57.radikal.ru/i157/1001/53/0b3ec9f7314e.jpg (broken link)









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Old 12-30-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,180 posts, read 4,957,401 times
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^ Frankfurt also has a great skyline for Europe. London is going to have a great one too someday.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenaudFR View Post
It's really surprising for LA, a large city as LA should be in the top 5 ^^
I guess Houston did well, but I expect more for this decade.
Sunbelt cities are ambitious, I wonder why no sunbelt city wants to build the tallest skyscraper in the US, just to say "Chicago and NYC are over, it's there no lol".
I am positive they will one day build more Supertall's.

But traditionally Chicago invented the first skyscraper, New York City invented the first Supertall (a building over 1,000 feet/300 Meters). So both of those cities have always been ahead of the game. Every 5 years, Chicago proposes a new ambitious "the country's tallest" project along with other supertall's. New York City constructs a lot of supertalls also.

The rest of the country builds tall skyscrapers but mostly in the 500-800 feet range. I know that sometime in the future some city in the sunbelt will go through and build another few supertall's. Miami, Houston, & Atlanta are the best bets for that happening.
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:52 AM
 
9,106 posts, read 13,459,115 times
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^ they also have transit networks that deliver millions of rides in each city each day. It's easier to build up and have tons of highrises when you don't have to depend on people trying to drive everywhere. Chicago grew its highrise stock by over 20% in the 2000's. I believe New York did by over 10%. That's pretty good growth in one decade.

I believe New York has around 5,500 highrises, and Chicago has around 1,100 with 16 more under construction and 92 awaiting development. Back just a few years ago there seemed to always be dozens underconstruction with well over 100 planned. Things are picking back up though - I was just reading that there are 3-4 buildings starting up in the downtown area. Chicago wasn't as overbuilt as say Miami. 2009 was a really bad year for downtown condo markets, but things are actually improving pretty quickly. Back in 2009 the downtown supply of condos shot up to almost 4 years as all activity basically stopped - but that has slowly dropped down to around 10 months. While they'll put up rental or mixed use towers, I think it'll be a few years before the condos start going up again. This year will probably see the supply come back in line with what you'd like, and then prices should rise again until it promps another wave of building.

I'm guessing the 75 or so in Houston and Atlanta are probably around 20% for those cities as well.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 01-24-2011 at 10:02 AM..
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Old 01-24-2011, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,274 posts, read 1,667,550 times
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I've heard chatter on other sites that a new skyscraper is coming to Cleveland in the not too distant future ... quite possibly an insurance company or a bank, from what I've gathered. The information that I've stumbled upon is "sketchy" at best ...

I guess we will just have to wait and see what develops ... I do have a feeling that the brand new MEDICAL MART and FLATS EAST TOWER may serve as a catalyst for even more new construction in the downtown area of Cleveland.

On a side note, those photos of MOSCOW are beyond AMAZING ... WoW!!!
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,409 posts, read 1,237,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
U.S -- yes, somebody will boom, probably on one of the coasts or the dirt cheap major cities in the South/Sunbelt.

Minneapolis/St. Paul -- no, not anytime soon.
It is funny you should say that because Minneapolis is one of the few US cities with an office tower in the works right now. United Properties is working on a 15 to 30 story tower at 1001 Nicollet across the street from the Target headquarters, there are renderings for it on the ESG Architects website. Final plans are supposed to be released in the first quarter of this year. There is also a 22 story office tower in Milwaukee that is supposed to begin construction this summer, and I believe one in Houston as well. None of these are huge projects, but it is a start.
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
1,408 posts, read 1,342,361 times
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New York City didn't really have a building construction recession, just delays that lasted till around Oct 2010. I believe New York actually builds more high buildings than the entire United States combined.

Current New York City construction stats:

- 4 Supertalls are under construction.
- 4 Supertalls are Approved for construction.
- 5 Supertalls proposed/plans.

Total Supertalls in various development stages: 13

- 6 Skyscrapers are under construction.
- 4 Skyscrapers are Approved for construction.
- Around 15 Skyscrapers are in proposal/planning stages.

Total Skyscrapers (not including Supertalls) in various development stages: ~25

Total Highrises (not including Skyscrapers, etc) in various development stages: over 70-80... hard to count lol.
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