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Old 01-04-2011, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Durham
49 posts, read 155,364 times
Reputation: 15

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Durham more liberal than Atlanta? In what parallel universe?
I believe that Durham is more liberal based on my experiences living in both cities. Atlanta burbs still have a well known KKK printing press in action, they banned gay art and took evolution out of their school textbooks. I'm not sure how you can say that they're more liberal than Durham.

To OP - the weather is roughly the same in both cities. Atlanta tends to have more ice storms than Durham in the winter, but Durham has had more snow days than I experienced in Atlanta. Both summers are quite hot and humid, so that might take getting used to if you want to be outdoors for long periods of time. Both cities are within driving distance of mountains so there are plenty of opportunity for hiking, white water rafting, etc.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:30 AM
 
3,263 posts, read 4,678,660 times
Reputation: 1892
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkybutt View Post
I believe that Durham is more liberal based on my experiences living in both cities. Atlanta burbs still have a well known KKK printing press in action, they banned gay art and took evolution out of their school textbooks. I'm not sure how you can say that they're more liberal than Durham.

To OP - the weather is roughly the same in both cities. Atlanta tends to have more ice storms than Durham in the winter, but Durham has had more snow days than I experienced in Atlanta. Both summers are quite hot and humid, so that might take getting used to if you want to be outdoors for long periods of time. Both cities are within driving distance of mountains so there are plenty of opportunity for hiking, white water rafting, etc.
Atlanta is a city of 5.5 million. The existence of conservative suburbs hardly even matters for most, your rather one-sided characterization of them aside. I leave the perimeter maybe once a week, usually to visit family. If you drive half an hour from cental Durham, there's probably no shortage of xenophobes and conservatives either, as is true in the East Bay as well.

If you consider Atlanta, Decatur sounds like a potentially good fit for you: there's plenty of walkable stuff to do, and it's always seemed to me to be a wayward bit of California, stuck in east Atlanta. I think the degree of culture shock is probably going to have a lot to do with where you choose to locate within either city, although for Atlanta I think this is more important.

For all intents and purposes, the weather in the two cities is identical. Atlanta is roughly 2 degrees warmer on average, according to the weather charts.
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Old 01-04-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,106,747 times
Reputation: 15348
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkybutt View Post
Atlanta burbs still have a well known KKK printing press in action, they banned gay art and took evolution out of their school textbooks.
Kindly cite your sources. This is ridiculous.
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Old 01-04-2011, 11:41 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,596,052 times
Reputation: 5669
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidals View Post
Durham is more liberal overall. Chapel Hill - right next door - is Northern California liberal. Durham retains more of a Southern vibe, though it's an arty, funky variation on that vibe.

Of course, more liberal overall, but at such a MICRO level. Who cares if it is more liberal overall if it is only a small microcosm. This is why I don't buy the whole "liberal college town" stuff that is surrounded by country bumpkin land. At least in Atlanta you have a 5 mil metro and a major city, with tons of transplants, companies and international visitors/consulates/restaurant scene. etc. Plus if you need to get out of there you've got the highest traffic airport in North America. NC and around Durham is country as hell IMO. I don't like being stuck in one little area of things to do. When comparing big cities, they work a bit different than small or medium size cities, they attract lots of types from all walks of life. So I don't really view it in terms of oh this place is X percentage liberal... I'm more concerned with Raw #'s... and ATL packs a much higher punch in raw #'s.

It's like people over here saying Madison is more liberal than Chicago... SURE... it is more liberal overall but Chicagoland is pushing 10million people there are way more raw #'s and way to find your place.

Madison is 500k~, Chicago is 10mil~.
Durham is 500k, Atlanta is 5.5mil~ ... similar concept.

ps chapel hill is not close to norcal in social liberal, fooling yourself if you think that.

Last edited by grapico; 01-04-2011 at 11:49 PM..
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Old 01-05-2011, 07:37 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,346,516 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkybutt View Post
I believe that Durham is more liberal based on my experiences living in both cities. Atlanta burbs still have a well known KKK printing press in action, they banned gay art and took evolution out of their school textbooks. I'm not sure how you can say that they're more liberal than Durham.
How can you compare Atlanta suburbs with the city of Durham itself? Compare suburbs with suburbs at the least. In this case, they're both red and conservative as hell.
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,831,684 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Madison is 500k~, Chicago is 10mil~.
Durham is 500k, Atlanta is 5.5mil~ ... similar concept.
While this is technically true for MSA comparisons, one has to consider that Durham is conjoined with another MSA (Raleigh/Cary) and really lives in a metro of 1.8 million.
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Old 01-05-2011, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
1,939 posts, read 3,988,823 times
Reputation: 1249
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkybutt View Post
I believe that Durham is more liberal based on my experiences living in both cities. Atlanta burbs still have a well known KKK printing press in action, they banned gay art and took evolution out of their school textbooks. I'm not sure how you can say that they're more liberal than Durham.

To OP - the weather is roughly the same in both cities. Atlanta tends to have more ice storms than Durham in the winter, but Durham has had more snow days than I experienced in Atlanta. Both summers are quite hot and humid, so that might take getting used to if you want to be outdoors for long periods of time. Both cities are within driving distance of mountains so there are plenty of opportunity for hiking, white water rafting, etc.
funkybutt, you're right I see cross burning everyday...OMG...
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Old 01-05-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,596,052 times
Reputation: 5669
Eh I'm definitely not sold on the merits of CSA data, esp when it quadruples the relevant size of an area. or in case of a place like LA when it expands to the size of entire states at 33,000 square miles. I think a lot of cities use it to make them feel more important than they really are. Also there are other areas that are *almost* a CSA with just a few more commuters % different and it isn't really a fair comparison that one area is say 9% commute, vs 10% then the other region is all of a sudden deemed more important??? Not buying it.
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Old 01-05-2011, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Traveling again
2,535 posts, read 1,970,114 times
Reputation: 6065
Quote:
Originally Posted by calswim View Post
I am from Northern California- Bay Area.

I am looking to study medicine and I am really into the outdoors and being active. I am not into the whole bar scene but I value convenience (close to grocery stores etc), accessibility and acceptance of people from different cultures. I am also considering Washington DC which I feel pretty strong about too. All schools are top ranked with maybe the one in North Carolina slightly higher.. but I have spoke with people and they mentioned that ranking doesnt help with jobs or anything like that.

Primary concern is just culture shock and adjustment since I have never lived outside of the bay area. Thanks!
Gwinnett county should be the first area to visit when you come to Atlanta. Start in Doraville then head north. We have a very large Asian population and it's a great place to live. I particularly like the Johns Creek/Duluth/Suwanee/Buford/Dacula/Lawrenceville/Athens areas the most. You will find plenty of Asian grocery stores, karaoke , restaurants, sauna's, churches, and more. Schools are great too. University of Georgia is in Athens and is a good school.

I agree that you should visit D.C. area primarily Alexandria VA & Baltimore MD both of which have quite a number of Asians. Both Gwinnett County and D.C. metro areas will be welcoming and warm moreso than NC. I have been to NC and it is more of a traditional southern culture there. You may not like it too much.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,346,516 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Eh I'm definitely not sold on the merits of CSA data, esp when it quadruples the relevant size of an area. or in case of a place like LA when it expands to the size of entire states at 33,000 square miles. I think a lot of cities use it to make them feel more important than they really are. Also there are other areas that are *almost* a CSA with just a few more commuters % different and it isn't really a fair comparison that one area is say 9% commute, vs 10% then the other region is all of a sudden deemed more important??? Not buying it.
I think CSA designations have more merit when there is more than one primary city within a region (not an overgrown suburb that has annexed/swelled "artificially," but true additional primary cities), and the Triangle does qualify here. Although split up into two MSAs, it's quite an interconnected/interdependent region.
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