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Old 07-15-2007, 07:28 PM
 
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Project for Public Spaces has a listing of what they consider to be the best use of waterfronts. The link containing this info can be found here. This thread, however, is only going to focus on waterfronts throughout in the U.S. Which cities situated by any large body of water (e.g.: lake, ocean, bay, or river), have utilized their waterfronts the best? Which are the worst?
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Old 07-15-2007, 08:23 PM
 
Location: New Zealand
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I nominate Chicago as one of the best -- the lakefront is a great respite from the concrete jungle. While many other cities have waterfront "parks", Chicago's stands out due to the sheer length and the pretty good upkeep of the park. The lakefront greenery is not confined to a small park -- it runs almost the entire length of the city.

Below are some images I captured during my 3 years there.

Diversey Harbor:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-102.jpg (broken link)

Lincoln Park (by LP Zoo):
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-126.jpg (broken link)

Lakefront near Fullerton Ave:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-117.jpg (broken link)

Magnificent Mile near Oak Street:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-172.jpg (broken link)
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Old 07-16-2007, 06:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzz View Post
I nominate Chicago as one of the best -- the lakefront is a great respite from the concrete jungle. While many other cities have waterfront "parks", Chicago's stands out due to the sheer length and the pretty good upkeep of the park. The lakefront greenery is not confined to a small park -- it runs almost the entire length of the city.

Below are some images I captured during my 3 years there.

Diversey Harbor:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-102.jpg (broken link)

Lincoln Park (by LP Zoo):
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-126.jpg (broken link)

Lakefront near Fullerton Ave:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-117.jpg (broken link)

Magnificent Mile near Oak Street:
http://www.syedfaisal.com/Photo_Albums/Chicago2006/Chicago2006-172.jpg (broken link)
Great pics, Fuzz. Thanks!
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Old 07-16-2007, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Great pics once again, Fuzz! I agree with you. Id also nominate San Diego and Miami Beach.
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Old 07-16-2007, 10:36 AM
 
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Chicago also get a "worst" in my opinion when you go to places like up and down the Waukeegan area.Much old rusted industrial eyesores along the coast that could be a gold mine and help some struggleing areas
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Old 07-16-2007, 10:40 AM
 
Location: New Zealand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanannie View Post
Chicago also get a "worst" in my opinion when you go to places like up and down the Waukeegan area.Much old rusted industrial eyesores along the coast that could be a gold mine and help some struggleing areas
That's not Chicago, that's Waukegan. Going the other way, I'd pick the area around Gary as one of the worst -- I've just driven through the area several times, so I could be mistaken -- perhaps Gary does have a waterfront nirvana?
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Old 07-16-2007, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Tempe Town Lake in Tempe, AZ (Phoenix metro area) has got to be one of the ugliest man-made bodies of water, with the worst planning and biggest waste of water ever constructed:



First of all, it's not a lake; it's a two mile stretch of the Salt River bed which been dry for almost 100 years (diverted to canals), which about 10 years ago, they decided to re-irrigate, using inflatable rubber dams, to create a local attraction. First of all, it's not a lake; you can't circle it-- it's a "river" lined with ugly concrete banks-- you have to go out of your way to go across a bridge just to get across. It's a magnet of mosquitos and other bugs in this dry desert. The water has a greenish color and smells horrible. The small section of Tempe Town Lake which is even halfway convenient to access, the so-called "Tempe Beach Park," is ruined with at least 4 major bridges, including a light rail and a Southern Pacific RR line crossing over in a short space. Not to mention power lines right above you and a freeway right on the other side. It is ugly and claustrophobic. A huge section of the lake borders a major parking lot for Sun Devil Stadium, and about 1 mile section of the lake, about half of the whole thing, is a complete waste, going through undevelopable land bordering a major power plant. I think you get my point now-- they tried to construct a local waterfront, but they ended up creating a monstrosity!
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Old 07-16-2007, 11:10 AM
 
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/\ Haha. Can't have a desert and water it too. Minneapolis' waterfront is a Godsend. Downtown has entire new neighborhoods which have been built recently. Opposite that, is a series of parks, historic mills and commercial spaces. That will also be infilled with housing and attractions while maintaining the historic values. A brand new park was opened this year that takes you onto a peninsula in the river (you can feel mist from Saint Anthony Falls) South of Downtown, the river parkway goes down both sides of the river and into Saint Paul. People run and ride along the parkway on top of the river bluffs. The actual river banks remain wooded. You have no idea you are in the city. Creeks run into the river, Minnehaha has a natural Falls surrounded by a large (and well used) city park. The entire river is encompassed within the larger city park system. The Northside of the river retains its industrial past. In due time, this area of warehouses can be redone to make great neighborhoods and community spaces. Thats what we do with a simple river. Imagine if we had a Great Lake like Chicago.
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Old 07-16-2007, 01:10 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Cleveland at one time had likely the worst waterfront in the nation, hence earning them the name "The mistake by the lake." As for St. Louis, I'm not sure where I'd put our waterfront these days....I know I wouldn't put it among the worst though. At one time our use was excellent, right now given we have such a complex river system I'd say that we still put it to good use with ferry-boats and casinos. In addition, the Mississippi River bluffs contain interesting caves that have been set up as tourist attractions in some areas. Right now our waterfront with the old abandoned factories and pollution I'd say may be getting dragged down, and the East St. Louis side of the Mississippi to me in general seems to be in very bad condition. If St. Louis had a great lake I think our downtown would be in better shape. Minneapolis appears to be making better use of the Mississippi currently than St. Louis in the meantime i'd say.
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Old 07-16-2007, 01:25 PM
 
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I'd have to nominate Seattle as one of the worst. The city could have had a great little downtown waterfront with greenspace and easy public access.

Instead, Seattle followed the advice of Robert Moses and rammed a multi-level traffic viaduct between downtown and the water.

Portland had the same problem - they actually tore down the freeway, relocated it across the river, and created 'Waterfront Park.'
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