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Old 02-01-2011, 01:45 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,948,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
I'm usually refrain from gloating on C-D, but...





These two graphs pretty much fly in the face of the "no one wants to live in the Atlanta, Houston or Dallas" crowd.
Who exactly is saying that? I think it's more like "no one in his/her right mind" wants to live certain places. Important distinction.

Plus most people don't move to a given place because they think it's so awesome; they're usually driven mainly by practical concerns.
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Old 02-01-2011, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,807,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
All of this will matter more when the "growth states" have a megalopolis equaling the Northeast Corridor. Until then, they've got a lot of catching up to do (especially since NYC, Philly and D.C. just keep getting bigger).

And as far as Illinois, since you mentioned it, you'll note that the population has stabilized after a period of losses, so clearly something has changed and you can't predict the future.
The Sunbelt will never have a Megalopolis equaling the Bos-Wash corridor and everyone knows it. You cannot replicate the seat of the federal government. Plus what does this have to do with growth anyways? My point was rather on point and hard to debate, which was that 74% of America's population growth came from the Sunbelt alone.

As far as Megalopolis's go and what not, I personally don't care if anyone ever measures up to Bos-Wash, they have an impressive Megalopolis, don't care if anyone else ever gets one that can compete.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Also, if we take the broad term of the "Sunbelt", a lot of growth is due to immigration as well. So, it's not like immigration hasn't had an impact on growth in that region.
That doesn't matter though whether it was the minimal term for Sunbelt or the expansive term. If you want to cut it down to the minimal term for Sunbelt, all it takes away is Northern Virginia, Colorado, & Utah. In which case, not really that drastic of a difference either way.

And why does it matter if those people are immigrants or not? They're still people, and the population growth happened there, not in the Frostbelt. The point is the Sunbelt is and was (this last decade) where America's population boom was at.

And I don't see that reversing giving the Frostbelt more growth than the Sunbelt, anytime soon.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
6,836 posts, read 12,861,359 times
Reputation: 1583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
What the hell? This can't be right.
it isnt. the mistake was pointed out earlier.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: South St Louis
3,795 posts, read 3,456,814 times
Reputation: 1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Okay it was in a Table 20, but it doesn't get to specifics on components of change.

Metros that grew by more than 30% include

Provo-Orem, Utah - 47.4% (Growth throughout, gradual slowing of it over the decade's course)
Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina - 41.2% (Fairly consistent growth throughout, but 2008-2009 a bit slower)
Greeley, Colorado - 40.2% although they have a note on it. (Growth throughout, some slowing in time)
Las Vegas-Paradise - 38.3% (Growth throughout, some slowing after 2007)
Austin-Round Rock - 36.4% (Growth throughout, a bit slower in 2008-2009)
Myrtle Beach-North Myrtle Beach-Conway, South Carolina 34.2% (Growth throughout, a bit slower in 2008-2009)
Phoenix, Arizona - 34.2% (Growth throughout, noticeable slowing in 2008-2009 yet still high)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas - 33.9% (Growth throughout, some slowing after 2007)

Cape Coral-Ft. Myers, Florida - 33.1% (Decline from 2008 to 2009, hard-hit by the recession as I recall)
Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord - 31.2% (Growth throughout, a bit slower in 2008-2009)
Boise-Nampa - 30.4% (Growth throughout, a bit slower in 2008-2009)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas - 30.1% (Consistent growth throughout, 2008-2009 actually looks higher than previous years)

Metros that declined by over 1.1% include

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner - 9.6% decline (Grew from 2007 to 2009)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman - 6.6% decline (Consistent decline throughout)
Buffalo-Niagara Falls, New York - 4% decline (Stable from 2008 to 2009)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - 3.1% decline (Stable from 2007 to 2009)
Flint, Michigan - 2.8% decline (Consistent decline after 2005)
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor - 2.6% decline (Consistent decline throughout, I know that contradicts threads here)
Utica-Rome, New York - 2.2% decline (Stable from 2006)
Scranton-Wilkes Barre 2% decline (Basically stable since 2005)
Charleston, West Virginia - 1.8% decline (Basically stable since 2005)
Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas - 1.7% decline (Modest growth since 2006)
Dayton, Ohio - 1.5% decline (Consistent decline throughout)

http://www.census.gov/compendia/stat...es/11s0020.pdf
My question is, why the phenomenal growth in Provo-Orem? I'm sure the birth rate isn't exceptionally high there. So it must be due to people relocating there...... Why??
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:34 PM
 
56,660 posts, read 80,973,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
The Sunbelt will never have a Megalopolis equaling the Bos-Wash corridor and everyone knows it. You cannot replicate the seat of the federal government. Plus what does this have to do with growth anyways? My point was rather on point and hard to debate, which was that 74% of America's population growth came from the Sunbelt alone.

As far as Megalopolis's go and what not, I personally don't care if anyone ever measures up to Bos-Wash, they have an impressive Megalopolis, don't care if anyone else ever gets one that can compete.

That doesn't matter though whether it was the minimal term for Sunbelt or the expansive term. If you want to cut it down to the minimal term for Sunbelt, all it takes away is Northern Virginia, Colorado, & Utah. In which case, not really that drastic of a difference either way.

And why does it matter if those people are immigrants or not? They're still people, and the population growth happened there, not in the Frostbelt. The point is the Sunbelt is and was (this last decade) where America's population boom was at.

And I don't see that reversing giving the Frostbelt more growth than the Sunbelt, anytime
soon.
I don't care so much about the immigration either, but some of it has been illegal and to the point of being a big issue in some parts of the Sunbelt. So, I'm just wondering how much does that effect the population growth?
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Old 02-01-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
1,472 posts, read 3,021,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1greatcity View Post
My question is, why the phenomenal growth in Provo-Orem? I'm sure the birth rate isn't exceptionally high there. So it must be due to people relocating there...... Why??
There is a lot of relocation, but the birthrate is pretty high too. Heavily Mormon region and they tend to have a lot more kids than most other (secular) Americans.
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Old 02-01-2011, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,524,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1greatcity View Post
My question is, why the phenomenal growth in Provo-Orem? I'm sure the birth rate isn't exceptionally high there. So it must be due to people relocating there...... Why??
Because it's Utah, which is a state that has seen an exploding population recently, mostly from relocation.

I'm not sure of the details, but there's definitely something attracting people there!

You can take a look at the scenery around Salt Lake City and Provo - there's one reason.
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:02 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,909 posts, read 12,173,501 times
Reputation: 5697
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Who exactly is saying that? I think it's more like "no one in his/her right mind" wants to live certain places. Important distinction.
Tomato/tomato. Either way, the data suggests otherwise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Plus most people don't move to a given place because they think it's so awesome; they're usually driven mainly by practical concerns.
Don't get me wrong, I do not believe in the idea that people are moving to Atlanta, Houston and Dallas in the millions just because they are "awesome". You are correct that it is primarily because of practical and economic reason. It's just icing on the cake that they are overall pretty nice cities. You'd just wouldn't guess it from some of the rants on C-D.
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 19,578,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
"Lottery revenues and metropolitan population growth are just two of more than a thousand topics addressed in the U.S. Census Bureau's Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2011. The Abstract is perennially the federal government's best-selling reference book. Contained in the 130th edition are 1,407 tables of social, political and economic facts that collectively describe the state of our nation and the world. Included this year are 65 new tables, covering topics such as insufficient rest or sleep, nursing home occupancy, homeschooling, earthquakes, U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions, organic farmland, honey bee colonies, crashes involving distracted drivers and cities with the highest transit savings."

U.S. Census Bureau Releases 130th Edition of Federal Government's Best-Selling Reference Book -- WASHINGTON, Dec. 6, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --

So what might interest this General US forum?

How about from among the nation's 50 largest metro areas in 2009, who had the highest rate of population increase between 2000 and 2009 (Table 21):

http://www.census.gov/compendia/stat...es/11s0021.pdf

1. Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina (41.2% increase)
2. Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada (38.3% increase)
3. Austin-Round Rock, Texas (36.4% increase)
4. Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona (34.2% increase)
5. Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC/SC (31.2% increase)

The Losers (population decrease rate between 2000 and 2009):

1. New York City-Long Island-Northern NJ, New York/NJ (minus 9.6%)
2. Buffalo-Niagra Falls, New York (minus 4.0%)
3. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (minus 3.1%)
4. Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio (minus 2.6%)
5. Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Michigan (minus 1.1%)

Why them (increases and decreases)?
These are still mainly estimates for metropolitan areas and not from the actual 2010 Census.
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,047,678 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Also, if we take the broad term of the "Sunbelt", a lot of growth is due to immigration as well. So, it's not like immigration hasn't had an impact on growth in that region.
Throughout American history, when hasn't immigration had a major impact? It always has. Where the immigrants land, where they end up, where they put down roots, and - of course - where they come from all change from decade to decade, but still, Chinatowns and Little Italies and the whole Boston Irish thing didn't materialize out of thin air. Without Ellis Island and a Great Migration, New York wouldn't be New York.

So if many Sunbelt states are turning multiethnic (some of them at a very swift rate) in the way that the urban Northeast, urban Frostbelt, and parts of the West Coast have been for generations, they are simply developing the same kind of complex diversity (a bit late to the table, perhaps) that has long been enough of an atmosphere in - say - NY or SF that it's generally taken for granted at this point. Acceptance of, or displeasure with this phenomenon is irrelevant.
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