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Old 01-07-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,673 posts, read 33,676,768 times
Reputation: 51867

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"Lottery revenues and metropolitan population growth are just two of more than a thousand topics addressed in the U.S. Census Bureau's Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2011. The Abstract is perennially the federal government's best-selling reference book. Contained in the 130th edition are 1,407 tables of social, political and economic facts that collectively describe the state of our nation and the world. Included this year are 65 new tables, covering topics such as insufficient rest or sleep, nursing home occupancy, homeschooling, earthquakes, U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions, organic farmland, honey bee colonies, crashes involving distracted drivers and cities with the highest transit savings."

U.S. Census Bureau Releases 130th Edition of Federal Government's Best-Selling Reference Book -- WASHINGTON, Dec. 6, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --

So what might interest this General US forum?

How about from among the nation's 50 largest metro areas in 2009, who had the highest rate of population increase between 2000 and 2009 (Table 21):

http://www.census.gov/compendia/stat...es/11s0021.pdf

1. Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina (41.2% increase)
2. Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada (38.3% increase)
3. Austin-Round Rock, Texas (36.4% increase)
4. Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona (34.2% increase)
5. Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC/SC (31.2% increase)

The Losers (population decrease rate between 2000 and 2009):

1. New York City-Long Island-Northern NJ, New York/NJ (minus 9.6%)
2. Buffalo-Niagra Falls, New York (minus 4.0%)
3. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (minus 3.1%)
4. Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio (minus 2.6%)
5. Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Michigan (minus 1.1%)

Why them (increases and decreases)?
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:17 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
"Lottery revenues and metropolitan population growth are just two of more than a thousand topics addressed in the U.S. Census Bureau's Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2011. The Abstract is perennially the federal government's best-selling reference book. Contained in the 130th edition are 1,407 tables of social, political and economic facts that collectively describe the state of our nation and the world. Included this year are 65 new tables, covering topics such as insufficient rest or sleep, nursing home occupancy, homeschooling, earthquakes, U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions, organic farmland, honey bee colonies, crashes involving distracted drivers and cities with the highest transit savings."

U.S. Census Bureau Releases 130th Edition of Federal Government's Best-Selling Reference Book -- WASHINGTON, Dec. 6, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --

So what might interest this General US forum?

How about from among the nation's 50 largest metro areas in 2009, who had the highest rate of population increase between 2000 and 2009 (Table 21):

http://www.census.gov/compendia/stat...es/11s0021.pdf

[b]1. Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina (41.2% increase)[/B]
2. Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada (38.3% increase)
3. Austin-Round Rock, Texas (36.4% increase)
4. Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona (34.2% increase)
5. Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC/SC (31.2% increase)

The Losers (population decrease rate between 2000 and 2009):

1. New York City-Long Island-Northern NJ, New York/NJ (minus 9.6%)
2. Buffalo-Niagra Falls, New York (minus 4.0%)
3. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (minus 3.1%)
4. Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio (minus 2.6%)
5. Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Michigan (minus 1.1%)

Why them (increases and decreases)?
No surprise to me.
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:51 AM
 
56,546 posts, read 80,847,919 times
Reputation: 12490
Keep in mind that the earlier part of the decade probably has a large influence on these numbers. I bet if you look at the last couple of years, you would see a difference.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:23 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Keep in mind that the earlier part of the decade probably has a large influence on these numbers. I bet if you look at the last couple of years, you would see a difference.
Not for Raleigh. It continues to grow rapidly. From another thread that had 3 month growth rates, Raleigh was also the fastest growing.
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Old 01-07-2011, 12:21 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,366,973 times
Reputation: 10919
You looked at the wrong line. That was New Orleans that had -9.6%.

New York City grew by almost 750,000 people.

I knew that couldn't have been right!!!
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Old 01-07-2011, 02:25 PM
 
56,546 posts, read 80,847,919 times
Reputation: 12490
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Not for Raleigh. It continues to grow rapidly. From another thread that had 3 month growth rates, Raleigh was also the fastest growing.
I know that Raleigh would be the exception, but for many areas the growth or population loss has slowed down in the later part of the decade.
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Old 01-07-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,047,623 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Keep in mind that the earlier part of the decade probably has a large influence on these numbers. I bet if you look at the last couple of years, you would see a difference.
I think you maybe right for Phoenix and Las Vegas as the housing bubble hit these cities hard especially Las Vegas. As a result, the population boom slowed down. Austin and Raleigh though kind of escaped that. Don't know about Charlotte. I only focused on the top 5 on that list.
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:11 PM
 
4,811 posts, read 8,811,367 times
Reputation: 2764
It just goes to show that the sunbelt cities are booming while the older cities in the Northeast are not growing as rapidly.
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,794,440 times
Reputation: 4047
It's projected that 88% of the America's population increase for the next 30 years will be in "the Sunbelt". Hey, I believe it, even with "slow downs" I still believe it. Even with "bad economies in some Sunbelt states" I still believe it. It's the reality. And its been the reality since air condition was invented and since Westward expansion to the Pacific initially started off.

There is a reason why the Northeast & Midwest's populations overall only grew by 3% or so apiece. And you want to know whats insane, numerically 1/4th the Midwest's population gains came from Chicago Metropolitan Area alone. 1/4th the Northeast's population gain came from New York City's Metropolitan Area alone.

Not a good sign for those that want to capitalize on "high growth" in those regions. I like New York & Illinois, but lets get real their passed their prime in terms of growth.
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:51 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,833,379 times
Reputation: 699
It also says that Nebrska would grow from 1,711,000 in 2000 to surpass 1,820,000 for the first time in 2030. It surpassed it in 2009 and reached 1,826,000 in 2010 (1,831,000 including military personell).

I'm sure they will revise it to surpassing 1,970,000 by 2040 but will actually do it by 2018. Their projections have been like this every decade.
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