U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Would you ever think about moving to Detroit
Yes 34 39.53%
No 52 60.47%
Voters: 86. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-11-2011, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,005 posts, read 2,451,388 times
Reputation: 246

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jwo85 View Post
So in our local newspaper there was a online article about two friends who visited Detroit, one from New York City and the other from Washington D.C.

They liked the atmosphere and one left their job in NYC and moved to Detroit and the other left in D.C. and headed to Detroit.

Here is the online article for more information.
Detroit's profile grows as investors, young professionals return to city | freep.com | Detroit Free Press

Would you think about ever doing the same thing?
I wouldn't live in the Detroit-Ann Arbor-Pontiac metro even if someone would pay me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-13-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH USA / formerly Chicago for 20 years
3,715 posts, read 5,802,221 times
Reputation: 2609
Quote:
Originally Posted by timeofseasons View Post
I wouldn't live in the Detroit-Ann Arbor-Pontiac metro even if someone would pay me.
I think I could enjoy living in Ann Arbor, and there might be other parts of the Detroit metro I wouldn't mind living in... but I thought this thread was about Detroit proper.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2011, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Chicago
931 posts, read 1,320,697 times
Reputation: 704
My cousin from NC accepted a job at a Detroit TV affiliate and moved downtown about 6 years ago. She loved living in the city at first until a couple shootings took place near her building and she eventually moved, I think to Royal Oak.

I would consider making the move if everything lined up, but I would definitely have to weigh the pros and cons and do some in-depth exploring around the city first. And of course the Mrs. would have to approve (doubtful).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,475,821 times
Reputation: 10928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I'd move to Detroit ahead of many other "popular" cities. I like the "underdog" mentality, it WAS once a very important city, it has great history, it's centrally located, it's geographically beautiful, and I PREFER the weather and its 4 (true) seasons.


Detroit today is very rough and nearly 1/3 of it is abandonded. However cheap cost of living and a wealth of great old buildings are some things it has going for it. The only hope for the city to be saved is for some people like the ones in the article moving there and taking a chance. If enclaves of redevelopment grew around the downtown, MAYBE a part of the city could be saved. For that to happen though the area must be made safe, and somehow the abandoned skyscrapers in downtown Detroit need to be reoccupied or demolished. Obvious abandonment in the downtown will only deter people from investing there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2011, 07:27 PM
 
54 posts, read 119,716 times
Reputation: 45
I'd move back to Detroit in a heartbeat, so obviously I'm not an "outsider." I've never lived in the city proper but was just a mile outside of the border (lived off of 9 mile and 8 mile is the northern border). After years of complaining about the area and just wanting out of Michigan period the chance came and we took it. Now all we want to do is go back. Even if it meant living in the city itself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2011, 08:24 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,586,165 times
Reputation: 5666
Detroit is hurt more by the media than anywhere. Although I'm not itching to move there, I will be pulling for Detroit for sure.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmup8AofWnw

Good Detroit Video shows some of the local scene, and a good beat IMO. Also relevant to this thread... Who's Afraid of Detroit?
I think a lot of people are...too bad.

Last edited by grapico; 01-15-2011 at 08:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2011, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,299,183 times
Reputation: 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Detroit is hurt more by the media than anywhere. Although I'm not itching to move there, I will be pulling for Detroit for sure.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmup8AofWnw

Good Detroit Video shows some of the local scene, and a good beat IMO. Also relevant to this thread... Who's Afraid of Detroit?
I think a lot of people are...too bad.
Thats the Detroit "sound".House music in that video.I LOVE it!And yes I could consider Detroit.I love the old archtecture and its history.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2011, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,811,868 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Detroit today is very rough and nearly 1/3 of it is abandonded. However cheap cost of living and a wealth of great old buildings are some things it has going for it. The only hope for the city to be saved is for some people like the ones in the article moving there and taking a chance. If enclaves of redevelopment grew around the downtown, MAYBE a part of the city could be saved. For that to happen though the area must be made safe, and somehow the abandoned skyscrapers in downtown Detroit need to be reoccupied or demolished. Obvious abandonment in the downtown will only deter people from investing there.
Please provide proof for this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2011, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,475,821 times
Reputation: 10928
One third is a common estimate of the level of abandonment in Detroit. All you have to do is google the words Detroit and abandonment, you will see all the proof you need. If you live in the city you couldnt possibly deny that there is ALOT of abandonment in Detroit. Ive seen it with my own eyes, and if you live there I know you have too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2011, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,811,868 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
One third is a common estimate of the level of abandonment in Detroit. All you have to do is google the words Detroit and abandonment, you will see all the proof you need. If you live in the city you couldnt possibly deny that there is ALOT of abandonment in Detroit. Ive seen it with my own eyes, and if you live there I know you have too.
still is not proof
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top