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View Poll Results: Would you ever think about moving to Detroit
Yes 34 39.53%
No 52 60.47%
Voters: 86. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-19-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,290,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by detroitlove View Post
still is not proof
I don't like beating a place down and I am on record for stating how I have hope for Detroit's future.Especially with its controversial (but needed current mayor).But I gotta say I have heard abandonment numbers even higher than that.Hear are some that info here:

Quote:
Today, not only is nearly half of Detroitís 138 square mile area vacant, beautiful architecture is left with no hope of use. There is simply not enough demand to sustain the amount and character of architecture.

Detroit has over 10,000 vacant homes. The combination of prevalent abandonments and rampant arson has led the city to purchase entire blocks and raze them

It is unclear just how much vacant office space there is in the central business district, but there are at least four skyscrapers that are currently completely empty and abandoned:
Zachery Fein: Photography - The Abandoned City of Detroit
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,520 posts, read 7,463,600 times
Reputation: 10925
The best hope Detroit has is too do what mayor Bing suggested. Tear down abandoned buildings, move people out of neighborhoods that have alot of abandonment. Let the empty land return to woodland or be made into parks. Concentrate people and resources in the best neighborhoods, encourage more development in those areas. Ignoring the fact that large parts of the city are abandoned will not help anyone. Part of the reason Detroit is unmanageable is because the city is trying to police and service a large geograpical area which is at least 1/3rd abandoned. This is expensive and ineffective. The first step toward restoration of order would be to concentrate the resources the city has in the areas that still are salvageable. In the end you would end up with a much smaller city, but one that has functioning neighborhoods, and a city with alot of vacant usable land, and alot of greenspace. Decades from now those things may help fuel redevolpment and maybe even growth if the govemental and social problems of Detroit improve by then.
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Old 01-20-2011, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, in between the Moose's butt and nose.
4,969 posts, read 7,319,004 times
Reputation: 1721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
I wish them luck, but Detroit is in the very very beginning stages of urban renewal in areas. A lot of investment in the city has come from companies outside of the city and state. It doesn't even seem like many in the metro area have faith in the city; look at the folks in the suburbs. In fact, Cleveland based Forest City was the company that renovated the Book Cadillac building.

Many areas of the city have taken on the urban prairie method, and I see that being a good start for Detroit because so many neighborhoods look like open fields now. But Detroit needs people like that. But I wouldn't do it.
They were saying that 16 years ago when I was there......
save for the blocks next to the Joe and the sports stadiums, I hear the rest of it (or most of the rest) still looks awful....
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Old 01-20-2011, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,809,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beenhereandthere View Post
They were saying that 16 years ago when I was there......
save for the blocks next to the Joe and the sports stadiums, I hear the rest of it (or most of the rest) still looks awful....
you hear.....that's the problem people hear, not experience
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Old 01-20-2011, 08:39 PM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,785,879 times
Reputation: 4428
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
I wouldn't care if it was 2020. My answer would still be NO!

I'm no urban pioneer and do not like big cities of any kind. I wouldn't care if the crime rate was zero and they had the best schools in the country.
If you don't like living in big cities of any kind, why does your location say Chicago area?

Are you living there because you had to relocate there? Do you live on the far edges of the metro area?
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Old 01-20-2011, 08:43 PM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,785,879 times
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From what I know about metro Detroit (I have been there a few times, and find the area fascinating) I would move to downtown, midtown/Wayne state area, or the Palmer Park/Sherwood Forest area.

If you love old historic mansions, and want to fulfill the dream of being able to afford one, and don't have to worry about kids, Detroit has that going for it.

Because Detroit was fairly wealthy back in the day, the housing that is not abandoned/falling apart is pretty awesome.

Houses built in Detroits heyday were/are bigger with bigger lots than what you even find in Chicagos bungalow belt.
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,118,463 times
Reputation: 6110
Zachery Fein: Photography - The Abandoned City of Detroit this was a real eye opener and one of the saddest things I have ever seen. Having said that, I kind of fell for Detroit after looking at the pictures. There is so much beauty there and I hope it isn't lost.
The scenes of the train station were especially poignant (?), I thought, like stepping back into another time.......and the pictures of the abandoned police station, courthouse, hospital, it is unbelievable. Thank you for posting this photography site.

If I were many years younger and could take the cold, I could like Detroit. What a history, it makes me teary eyed.
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