U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-17-2011, 10:55 AM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,426 times
Reputation: 804

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogwalker425 View Post
I would choose a suburb over a city any day. The older I get, the more people get on my damn nerves and I don't want to be around them if I can help it. I am starting to think a more rural life would be the way to go. I can't stand the noise of cities. I need peace and quiet, and yes, I like having a car.
I can definitely understand the appeal of rural living. Unfortunately, too many small towns are either dying or becoming touristy or suburbanized.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-17-2011, 12:59 PM
 
2,881 posts, read 4,616,426 times
Reputation: 3584
I can live in urban, suburban or rural places, but I'm pretty adaptable. That's not to valorize myself--I just have a small life!: By urban I don't mean a big corporate and cocktail life; by suburban I don't mean a huge manicured yard with dogs, three cars and a $100K kitchen; and by rural I don't mean an organic farm or vineyard. No, just a pretty nondescript existence.

Each of those choices carries compromises. If determinedly density minded urban folk don't think they face lifestyle compromises, well...take the #9 San Bruno bus in SF every day for 5 years. Watch 3 buses pass you by because they're too crowded. And when one finally stops, squeeze in like a sardine (no exaggeration) and then try and extricate yourself when you have to get off. Face at least four panhandlers not ten steps out your front door. Expect the occasional bum to get really P.O.'d when you say no.

Urban life will lose its charm too, like everywhere else. It's not all writing columns for the free weekly, sipping cosmos and reading Tom Wolfe on a park bench waiting to meet fascinating strangers. Anyone want to live in the 'burbs, go for it. Find the life you like. It's not like other choices are gonna disappear if you really want to pursue them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2011, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Murika
2,526 posts, read 2,599,526 times
Reputation: 1919
I am an urban dweller - the bigger, the better. I like the noise, the business, the hustle and bustle, the 24-hour-anything goes approach to life, etc. I have spent my entire life in cities - in Europe and in the US. I LOVE city life.

Then I had a kid - and my needs changed. Now, I live in a suburb of a major city. My kid can go outside without being exposed to lots of traffic, pollution, noise, etc. In return, I can no longer walk out of my front door and into the corner store.

That said, not all suburbs are the same. I completely understand your point and can very much relate. In reality, I was scared at the prospect of living here. That said, I managed to find a suburb where I do not need a car. My community is linked by roughly 100 miles of recreational paths - I can walk or bike to the store, schools, restaurants, etc. I can even take a golf cart if the weather is inclement.

I think that there is a time in everyone's life to live in a given environment. As time progresses, needs change and what once seemed incredibly desirable suddenly become a bit more burdensome.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2011, 04:35 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,446,012 times
Reputation: 6543
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
I can definitely understand the appeal of rural living. Unfortunately, too many small towns are either dying or becoming touristy or suburbanized.
Yes, that's true. The ideal situation for me would be a small town or some place out in the country that's still close to a bigger town/city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:05 AM
 
90 posts, read 256,286 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh for Pity's Sake! If someone does try to break down the stereotypes of the suburbs, an "urbanista" comes along and says "Who can afford that?". I don't know where you live, PD. In metro Denver there are affordable homes in walkable suburbs. If you think they yards are small in the burbs, take a look at the yards in the cities.
Not sure why me mentioning the prices for homes shown in PPs enticing photos made you angry. It shouldn't be surprising that such large beautiful homes in accessible walkable suburbs would cost and arm and a leg in most large metro areas.

FYI, we live in NYC, where all I said is pretty accurate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:09 AM
 
90 posts, read 256,286 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Maybe. The first few sentences were directed at Ogre's examples "these suburbs..". You seemed rather defensive.
Thank you! Exactly. I said "We find ourselves priced out of most of such nice walkable suburban/urban areas when it comes to metro areas where we tend to find employment in our fields."

I was specific to the areas where we lived (NYC and Bay Area) and others similar large metro areas where professional in our fields tend to find jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:20 AM
 
90 posts, read 256,286 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
It is true that most of the suburbs I showed in my earlier post are very upscale towns. I'm not absolutely sure about this, but I think Cleveland Heights may be an exception which may be more of a middle-class town, maybe even working class in some neighborhoods. Keep in mind that the original post seemed to portray ALL suburbs as the bland land of ranch houses and strip malls. I did not mean for my post to be an in-depth treatise on the variety of suburban landscapes to be found across the U.S., only a few examples to briefly point out that the OP's blanket view of suburbia is inaccurate.

In fact, here in the Boston area where I live, I know of plenty of suburbs which, by the standards of the Boston area, are not overly expensive, which offer various combinations of public transit, local shopping within walking distance for many residents, and interesting architecture--often more like houses with some nice architectural appeal rather than large buildings, since we are talking about suburbs here, but nice architecture nonetheless.

My observation has been that suburbs vary widely in the degree to which they display those characteristics generally viewed as typically suburban. Some suburbs are not very "suburban" at all, except in the sense of having many single-family, detached houses. Others have some of the charactristics the OP describes while lacking others of those features, with those very "suburban" characteristics in many cases being mixed in with some of the features of genuine small towns or outer urban areas. And you can see this mix of characteristics in suburbs of various economic levels. Not all suburbs are the purely "suburban" cliches described in the opening post.
I have to say the photos you posted were more like a tease. That's the first thing that came to mind. I never said that I agree with the OP, I don't as a matter of fact, just actively looking to move to a nice place with easier commute to our jobs and getting frustrated. Pretty much to get a decent, and, I don't mean nice and large, like in your photos house, we have to look in over a million dollar price range in places like NYC and SF Bay Area, that are commute friendly, walkable, have great schools. I am not familiar with Boston or with Denver the other poster mentioned. One of our friends lives in DC area and says the same thing I am saying as far as how expensive such nice suburbs are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 06:41 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualDreamer View Post
I have to say the photos you posted were more like a tease. That's the first thing that came to mind. I never said that I agree with the OP, I don't as a matter of fact, just actively looking to move to a nice place with easier commute to our jobs and getting frustrated. Pretty much to get a decent, and, I don't mean nice and large, like in your photos house, we have to look in over a million dollar price range in places like NYC and SF Bay Area, that are commute friendly, walkable, have great schools. I am not familiar with Boston or with Denver the other poster mentioned. One of our friends lives in DC area and says the same thing I am saying as far as how expensive such nice suburbs are.
Where in the NYC area are you looking?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-30-2011, 12:03 PM
 
6,742 posts, read 6,550,322 times
Reputation: 5059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clyde81 View Post


Just wait until the gas prices reach $5 a gallon and the surburban folks going to be complaining about they can't drive to work, school, shopping, nightclubs, sports games, etc.
I...agree. I've come to the morbid conclusion that gas is nowhere near expensive enough. Hell, make it $10 a gallon and get some of these bozos off the road.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-30-2011, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,043,716 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by CubanfromMiami View Post
Every house looks the same, people are the same, "entertainment" doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house. You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart. I don't know, it just seems like such a horrible way to live. It really perplexes me why people actually WANT to live in suburbia. I don't really mind living in a tiny apartment in the city because I spend most of my time outside anyways. In suburbia, you really are trapped in your house and can't go anywhere.
As other posters have said, suburbia is boring and bland for a young single or even a young couple. But when you start having kids and getting a family established, the suburbs become a lot more appealing. Also, the lifestyle of those in their late 30s and 40s is much different than someone in their 20s. The "family" lifestyle is much more compatible with suburbia than the "party" lifestyle of twentysomethings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top