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Old 01-30-2011, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,313,140 times
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I think this is mostly true as well. Baby Boomers practically invented suburbs, which tells me the masses wanted space for their kids. It's certainly not a one-size-fits-all approach, but I think there is some truth there. I have a young family and as much as I want to be closer to the core, I have to think about things that affect my wife and child -- something I never had to consider before.
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Old 01-31-2011, 02:17 AM
 
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A lot of people just sort of give up. "Oh, I have my family now, I'm happy living in a bland cardboard box 20 miles away from anything."
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,396,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CubanfromMiami View Post
Every house looks the same, people are the same, "entertainment" doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house. You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart. I don't know, it just seems like such a horrible way to live. It really perplexes me why people actually WANT to live in suburbia. I don't really mind living in a tiny apartment in the city because I spend most of my time outside anyways. In suburbia, you really are trapped in your house and can't go anywhere.
The houses in my city are much different than what you can see in the majority of Chicago, and in fact, large cities tend to have many houses/apartments that look the same. My walkability score is an 80. In fact, living in suburbia gives me more options to do things outside than living in the city would. I also have access to better schools and a safer neighborhood while not paying the extra taxes not to get that.
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:38 AM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,925,613 times
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If I could afford a nice house somewhere in a city neighborhood I'd be fine with it but suburbs are more affordable and I do not want to live in apartments my whole life. A small town with a decent infrastructure close to a big city would be better than a suburb though.
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Old 01-31-2011, 09:18 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,457 posts, read 14,307,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1208 View Post
A lot of people just sort of give up. "Oh, I have my family now, I'm happy living in a bland cardboard box 20 miles away from anything."
Well, no, they are often near parks and other recreational opportunities, good schools, and probably most importantly they are near lots of other families with children.
People generally tend to like to be around other people that have similar interests. It's why I often see posts that say things like "I'm a young professional looking for a place to live with lots of other singles and a good nightlife"
Why is it so bad that young families want to be around other young families?

Not that the suburbs have a corner on bland and boring boxes to live in either, plenty of city apartments aren't exactly architectural gems. Blech
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Old 01-31-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: South Chicagoland
4,111 posts, read 7,631,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1208 View Post
A lot of people just sort of give up. "Oh, I have my family now, I'm happy living in a bland cardboard box 20 miles away from anything."
20 miles away from anything? Seriously?

The other night, me and some friends went to a bar/restaurant for Chicago style pizza and beer, checked out a record store and caught a movie at the movie theater. In the city, we could've done this but also spent a lot of the night looking for a damn parking spot. Fun, fun.

Don't get me wrong. I love the city. But this comment about suburbia is ridiculous and unfair. Although it's a kind of an accurate description of RURAL areas..

Last edited by urza216; 01-31-2011 at 09:35 AM..
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Old 01-31-2011, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
.... Baby Boomers practically invented suburbs...
Actually, the boomers were largely raised in the suburbs.
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:35 AM
 
1,592 posts, read 2,962,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
People generally tend to like to be around other people that have similar interests. It's why I often see posts that say things like "I'm a young professional looking for a place to live with lots of other singles and a good nightlife"
And when I hear people describe themselves that way it makes me shake my head with embarrassment. Seriously, if I ever heard someone refer to themselves as a 'young professional' in real life I would wonder what the hell their deal was.



You know, people can still live in nice, family oriented neighborhoods that are within city limits. These neighborhoods often are very safe, with lots of nice things to do, have character, and are close to many attractions. I don't have a problem with 'residential neighborhoods.' I wouldn't want to raise a family in an apartment in the inner city or anything.

And especially, given that ALL cities have a LOT of neighborhoods that fit this bill, it makes me wonder why people would choose to live in cookie-cutter bland cardboard box PTA and Minivan bedroom communities where you have to drive for 45 minutes to get to anything cool or interesting, and still have to drive to get to your schools or supermarkets or what have you. I personally enjoy being able to walk to these things and to get a little variety place to place.

A suburb in Buffalo, NY, is not all that different from one in Phoenix AZ, because they are usually all made on the "airport USA" model. Maybe you people don't mind eating at Applebees every meal and shopping at Target all the time, but me, I like a little variety.
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,798,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1208 View Post
And especially, given that ALL cities have a LOT of neighborhoods that fit this bill, it makes me wonder why people would choose to live in cookie-cutter bland cardboard box PTA and Minivan bedroom communities where you have to drive for 45 minutes to get to anything cool or interesting, and still have to drive to get to your schools or supermarkets or what have you. I personally enjoy being able to walk to these things and to get a little variety place to place.
Because most Americans obviously don't mind driving, and the simple fact is that around most major U.S. cities, the cookie-cutter neighborhoods you deride offer quality housing, good schools and safety at lower prices/taxes than the city neighborhoods you love.
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Old 01-31-2011, 12:04 PM
 
1,592 posts, read 2,962,767 times
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Originally Posted by grmasterb View Post
Because most Americans obviously don't mind driving
Yes, that is getting to be a real problem. A lot of Americans prefer the shorter driving times offered by closer in neighborhoods, as well as the option of being able to walk to many places if they so choose.

Quote:
and the simple fact is that around most major U.S. cities, the cookie-cutter neighborhoods you deride offer quality housing
Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Many newer suburban homes are very cheaply made. Many of the older city homes are made with high quality material and craftsmanship that you just don't see any more.

Quote:
good schools and safety
Again, I am not talking about inner city ghettos here. Many city neighborhoods have great schools and are very safe.

Quote:
at lower prices/taxes than the city neighborhoods you love.
Once again, sometimes that is true, many times it isn't. Many suburbs have high home prices and high taxes, combined with the costs of having to drive everywhere, HOA fees, etc.
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