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Old 01-10-2011, 03:21 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,856 posts, read 22,953,196 times
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The obvious thing to me is many people don't like density and don't hate cars. In fact I would gather, from the evidence, the majority of Americans dislike density and love cars. I'm not personally real fond of cars, but there's plenty of traffic in cities and navigating the foot traffic there is not always what I'd deem "walkable."

I think the advantage of a suburb are you can go to the city for the things cities offer, but you can be in a quieter and generally safer place with plenty of room. According to Pew Research suburbs have the most contented people.

Suburbs Not Most Popular, But Suburbanites Most Content - Pew Research Center

And I don't think it's just with married people who have kids. I know of at least one unmarried person who likes suburbs for the reasons I mentioned. They tried to get along without a car and be in the city, but managing train schedules was a pain for them. Some people also just like the control and carrying ability having their own car brings.

Still I don't know that I'd like a suburb as I'm not that eager to be near a big city, they often sound expensive, and they do seem a bit too conformist for me.
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Old 01-10-2011, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,701 posts, read 4,667,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CubanfromMiami View Post
Every house looks the same, people are the same, "entertainment" doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house. You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart. I don't know, it just seems like such a horrible way to live. It really perplexes me why people actually WANT to live in suburbia. I don't really mind living in a tiny apartment in the city because I spend most of my time outside anyways. In suburbia, you really are trapped in your house and can't go anywhere.
Actually much of what you said is just not true in most cases. I have lived in suburbs or small towns most of my life, and rarely have I ever seen a neighborhood where all of the houses look the same. The closest to that I have seen are areas where there may be 4 different models that alternate up and down the streets, with varying colors. but I have never seen one of these "cookie cutter" neighborhoods you always hear about.

And to the question in general- people want to live in suburbia because it is superior to living in the actual city! Suburbs are generally easier to navigate- traffic is not so heavy- you can get a real single family home instead of just a row home or condo, you can have an attached garage, you can have a yard, etc, etc, etc. And people in suburbs are not trapped in their homes any more than you are trapped in your tiny apartment- they play in their yards, they go for walks through the tree-lined peaceful neighborhoods, they go to the parks, they have so many outdoor activities they can do.
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Old 01-10-2011, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
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I am 26 years old and prefer suburban, or even rural living over city living. I grew up in a semi-rural town, and then lived in NYC for almost 2 years, and now I'm back in the suburbs of CT. Suburban living is superior IMO because you get peace and quiet, less crowding, less traffic, less people in your face, and less diseases and sickness. Having a car is great, because you can throw large items in the trunk, instead of carrying stuff in the freezing cold, walking around the city. That was awful and I would never do it again. Winters are easier in the suburbs, because you can get in your car and turn the heat on, but in NYC, you have to walk in the freezing cold with windchills and it really sucks!
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,569 posts, read 6,016,359 times
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You can live in the city with a car.

Where the hell did people get the idea that everyone in the city relies on public trans?

And it's fine raising kids in the city.
I was raised in the city.

All these stereotypes are annoying.

There are parts of Chicago where the houses all look the same.

There are suburbs around Chicago where the houses are all unique.
Suburbs that are walkable.
Suburbs that are ghettos

Suburbs and the cities mesh together. They just don't spontaneousness turn into something else across the border.
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH USA / formerly Chicago for 20 years
3,714 posts, read 5,790,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clyde81 View Post
I do not understand why folks like the suburbs as well. Suburban life is pretty generic. If you closed your eyes, and were magically transported from one to another, they would all look alike: the same cookie cutter houses and McMansions, the same old malls with the same old chain stores, the same corporate restaurant food chains from cheap fast food to the up-scale. Folks tend to look alike as well. And there is little individuality. I prefer living in the city because they are melting pots of cultures and folks. They are more diverse. There is much more to do. I tend to think folks move to the suburbs because it's a better place to raise a family.
Oh, geez. Many suburbs are like that, yes. Many others are not.
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Old 01-10-2011, 11:41 PM
 
Location: NYC/Orlando
1,968 posts, read 3,577,421 times
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I love suburban living.. or at least, the suburb that I grew up in and come home to on breaks. There's abundant entertainment- I live 5 minutes from Universal Orlando and 15 from Disney World. I'm about the same distance to two major malls, multiple outlets, a bunch of marketplaces with restaurants, groceries, etc. And downtown isn't far away. I much prefer this way of life to NYC, where getting anywhere is a hassle with subways, buses, etc... I can only comfortably afford one grocery store and it takes me about 40 minutes to get there.
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Old 01-11-2011, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Orlando Metro Area
3,593 posts, read 5,839,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brinkofsunshine View Post
I love suburban living.. or at least, the suburb that I grew up in and come home to on breaks. There's abundant entertainment- I live 5 minutes from Universal Orlando and 15 from Disney World. I'm about the same distance to two major malls, multiple outlets, a bunch of marketplaces with restaurants, groceries, etc. And downtown isn't far away. I much prefer this way of life to NYC, where getting anywhere is a hassle with subways, buses, etc... I can only comfortably afford one grocery store and it takes me about 40 minutes to get there.
Not all suburbs are created equal and a good portion of Orlando's are good examples of such. We have lakes peppering the suburbs/city that provide for backyard access to professional wake boarding, skiing, tubing, fishing, boating, etc. Our suburbs have many clusters of retail, restaurant, nightlife, and other fun things to do, spread conveniently throughout the metro so going DT isn't necessary unless desired. We also, as you pointed out, have suburban lifestyles that grant the ability to frequent amazing entertainment options like theme parks, dining, shows, shopping, and more. Not to mention our weather allows for all of this year round. Sure breaks the mold of cold, snowed in, boring suburb with nothing to do.

Ahhh Suburbia:

My own picture taken last winter lol
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Old 01-11-2011, 01:21 AM
 
1,083 posts, read 1,927,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
suburbia is good for raising kids.
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Old 01-11-2011, 01:22 AM
 
1,083 posts, read 1,927,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by throatguzzler View Post
suburbs are peaceful and a safe-haven for couples with children.
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Old 01-11-2011, 01:28 AM
 
1,083 posts, read 1,927,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nedergras View Post
Yeah if you consider manual labor most of your life as happiness, I guess if it keeps you busy enough to stop you from actually thinking about life then yeah anyone doing it would be happy or so they think. Also whats considered urban life in most North American cities isn't really urban on a worldly level anyway.
Can I flush this post?
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