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Old 01-13-2011, 01:56 AM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,726,416 times
Reputation: 4583

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"Every house looks the same,"

Hmmm, well . . .

Lake Forest, IL:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv21999.php

Shaker Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc264.php

Brookline, MA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv15833.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv17016.php

Cleveland Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc218.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv15195.php

"people are the same,"

Like the people in the suburban neighborhood where I grew up. My family may have been the most "all the same" people at our end of the street, because my parents were both raised in the middle class, but then there were: the self-made business executive next door; the Iranian woman doctor next door on the other side; the family across the street whose father's parents were refugees from the Russian Revolution who had escaped across the Black Sea under gunfire from the Bolsheviks; the family around the corner whose father was an Italian immigrant who had run a truck farm in his early years in the U.S.; the Chinese economics professor, refugee from the Maoist Revolution, around the corner in another direction; down the road a mile or so, the son of Italian immigrants, who ran a successful trash collection business; the family down the street who moved around and had lived in a number of U.S. metro areas because the father was a business executive who was transferred every few years.

Most of them white, yes. Not "diverse" in the sense of mixed races people often mean when they say they want "diversity," yet a rich diversity of backgrounds and stories to tell.

"'entertainment' doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house."

Like those poetry readings I used to go to at a bookstore in one of those awful, sterile strip malls; the Revolutionary War historic sites in the suburbs of Boston and Philadelphia; the Civil War historic sites in D.C.'s northern VA suburbs; the art museum at Oklahoma University in the OKC suburb of Norman, which has recently received a gift of what is said to be the most impressive collection of Monet paintings at any U.S. university museum; the Air & Space Museum branch at D.C.'s suburban Dulles Airport; the Strategic Air Museum in the suburbs of Omaha; the Thai restaurant within walking distance of my sister's home in the suburbs.

"You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything . . ."

Shaker Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc263.php

Lake Forest, IL:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc13159.php

"and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart"

Brookline, MA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc14573.php

Alexandria, VA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc16847.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc38127.php

Wellesley, MA:

http://blog.rutledgeproperties.com/f...wellesley4.jpg.

Drab places, those suburbs. Why would anyone want to live there?

Last edited by ogre; 01-13-2011 at 03:00 AM..
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Old 01-13-2011, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
624 posts, read 1,203,856 times
Reputation: 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by CubanfromMiami View Post
Every house looks the same, people are the same, "entertainment" doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house. You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart. I don't know, it just seems like such a horrible way to live. It really perplexes me why people actually WANT to live in suburbia. I don't really mind living in a tiny apartment in the city because I spend most of my time outside anyways. In suburbia, you really are trapped in your house and can't go anywhere.
Oh please, I bet you live in a suburb or in a suburban setting in Miami, almost everyone in this country for the exception of NYC I think live in the surburbs of their respective metro.
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Old 01-13-2011, 06:41 AM
 
Location: South Chicagoland
4,111 posts, read 7,632,491 times
Reputation: 2030
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew61 View Post
Unfortunately, crime and drugs and all that sort of thing do eventually tend to migrate to suburbs, at least in some areas.
No "migration," necessary. Crackheads and petty street criminals are bred in 21st century suburbia. They're a product of their poor, run down, suburban environment.

A rough neighborhood is a rough neighborhood. It doesn't matter where it's located on the map.
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Old 01-13-2011, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
187 posts, read 479,639 times
Reputation: 186
Crackheads are mostly in the suburbs anyways...
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:12 PM
 
90 posts, read 256,264 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
"Every house looks the same,"

Hmmm, well . . .

Lake Forest, IL:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv21999.php

Shaker Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc264.php

Brookline, MA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv15833.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv17016.php

Cleveland Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc218.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesv/picv15195.php

"people are the same,"

Like the people in the suburban neighborhood where I grew up. My family may have been the most "all the same" people at our end of the street, because my parents were both raised in the middle class, but then there were: the self-made business executive next door; the Iranian woman doctor next door on the other side; the family across the street whose father's parents were refugees from the Russian Revolution who had escaped across the Black Sea under gunfire from the Bolsheviks; the family around the corner whose father was an Italian immigrant who had run a truck farm in his early years in the U.S.; the Chinese economics professor, refugee from the Maoist Revolution, around the corner in another direction; down the road a mile or so, the son of Italian immigrants, who ran a successful trash collection business; the family down the street who moved around and had lived in a number of U.S. metro areas because the father was a business executive who was transferred every few years.

Most of them white, yes. Not "diverse" in the sense of mixed races people often mean when they say they want "diversity," yet a rich diversity of backgrounds and stories to tell.

"'entertainment' doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house."

Like those poetry readings I used to go to at a bookstore in one of those awful, sterile strip malls; the Revolutionary War historic sites in the suburbs of Boston and Philadelphia; the Civil War historic sites in D.C.'s northern VA suburbs; the art museum at Oklahoma University in the OKC suburb of Norman, which has recently received a gift of what is said to be the most impressive collection of Monet paintings at any U.S. university museum; the Air & Space Museum branch at D.C.'s suburban Dulles Airport; the Strategic Air Museum in the suburbs of Omaha; the Thai restaurant within walking distance of my sister's home in the suburbs.

"You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything . . ."

Shaker Heights, OH:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc263.php

Lake Forest, IL:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc13159.php

"and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart"

Brookline, MA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc14573.php

Alexandria, VA:

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc16847.php

http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc38127.php

Wellesley, MA:

http://blog.rutledgeproperties.com/f...wellesley4.jpg.

Drab places, those suburbs. Why would anyone want to live there?
These are beautiful photos of really nice neighborhoods. The question is, how much will it cost for a new family to move to one of these areas at today's prices? Lucky for you if you grew up in one of these areas and own your home at a purchase price of 30 years ago. We find ourselves priced out of most of such nice walkable suburban/urban areas when it comes to metro areas where we tend to find employment in our fields. The places that are affordable and safe are usually further away from amenities, jobs, lack public transit options and tend to have either uglier type of old housing stock or newer HOA subdivision construction, where you cannot do anything with your yard/home without approvals, yards are tiny and neighbors are pretty close by and there is nothing within reasonable walking distance.


I am sure everyone would want to live in a beautiful walkable residential city neighborhood or a nice suburb, especially in one of these mansions you have photographed The problem is, it's super expensive and out of reach for most families to try to settle in such places without inheritance.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:52 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualDreamer View Post
These are beautiful photos of really nice neighborhoods. The question is, how much will it cost for a new family to move to one of these areas at today's prices? Lucky for you if you grew up in one of these areas and own your home at a purchase price of 30 years ago. We find ourselves priced out of most of such nice walkable suburban/urban areas when it comes to metro areas where we tend to find employment in our fields. The places that are affordable and safe are usually further away from amenities, jobs, lack public transit options and tend to have either uglier type of old housing stock or newer HOA subdivision construction, where you cannot do anything with your yard/home without approvals, yards are tiny and neighbors are pretty close by and there is nothing within reasonable walking distance.


I am sure everyone would want to live in a beautiful walkable residential city neighborhood or a nice suburb, especially in one of these mansions you have photographed The problem is, it's super expensive and out of reach for most families to try to settle in such places without inheritance.
Oh for Pity's Sake! If someone does try to break down the stereotypes of the suburbs, an "urbanista" comes along and says "Who can afford that?". I don't know where you live, PD. In metro Denver there are affordable homes in walkable suburbs. If you think they yards are small in the burbs, take a look at the yards in the cities.
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh for Pity's Sake! If someone does try to break down the stereotypes of the suburbs, an "urbanista" comes along and says "Who can afford that?". I don't know where you live, PD. In metro Denver there are affordable homes in walkable suburbs. If you think they yards are small in the burbs, take a look at the yards in the cities.
That's because all of the suburbs Ogre posted ARE extremely expensive and unaffordable (Shaker Heights might be an exception, I don't know). There was no mention of Denver suburbs. PD's response was reasonable considering the suburbs posted.
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtownboogie View Post
Oh please, I bet you live in a suburb or in a suburban setting in Miami, almost everyone in this country for the exception of NYC I think live in the surburbs of their respective metro.
Umm. No one lives in cities? You make it sound like cities have 0 population.
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Philly
126 posts, read 268,116 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by CubanfromMiami View Post
Every house looks the same, people are the same, "entertainment" doesn't really include anything other than going to ____'s house. You can't really walk anywhere. You need a car for everything and shopping consists of little else than going to the local strip mall or Walmart. I don't know, it just seems like such a horrible way to live. It really perplexes me why people actually WANT to live in suburbia. I don't really mind living in a tiny apartment in the city because I spend most of my time outside anyways. In suburbia, you really are trapped in your house and can't go anywhere.
I agree with this. i hate suburbs!

Before anyone says that I probably hadn't ever tried living in one, I have

I lived in a city until I was about middle school age, and i lived there until I was finished high school. I don't think suburbs really are a good place to raise kids. I have many reasons to think that, but one of my main reasons is that there is no way of getting around in the typical suburb, because most people in suburbs dont walk or take public transportation. Like you said, you need a car for everything.

I like to walk, but walking through the suburbs is so boring, with all the cookie cutter homes, it's kinda like your walking down the same street over and over again, and walking in the suburbs usually means you have to walk pretty far. To me, walking through the city is fun. You see a lot of interesting people and places, and parks and stuff, and there's always something to do close by!

Living in a suburb as a teenager before you have your own lisence and car is THE WORST! Everything is so spread out and far away. You can't walk anywhere, and you cant take a bus or anything. If you don't have a ride as a kid you are STUCK in your house all day. I remember spending countless days sitting at home bored, because I had no way of getting anywhere.

They are not good places for kids to live, because kids can't do anything if they live there. They have no way of getting around. They can't drive. They will be stuck in their house all day, or their lawn, or whatever

I was kinda lucky though, because I lived maybe like 7-8 blocks from a bus stop. But the suburban buses take SOO LONG. They would come once every hour or so, (except for early in the morning they were kinda frequent, but I am not a morning person) plus I would have to pay extra money for a transfer, because I would take the bus to a train station, and then take a train into the city. The extra money was not much, but I would also have to pay that extra money for the rides back, and I probably wasted a lot of money doing that if you add up every extra dollar I spent, than just if i lived in the city still, and didnt have to pay extra money everytime I wanted to not be extremely bored all the time.

I also had a hard time trying to find a job, because I wasn't very close to anything, and its hard to pay for a bus+train (hard to pay for anything, actually) when your a teen thats not making any money.

If your a teen living in the suburbs, and you have a license, and a car, you can actually get around, BUT there's no where really to go in a typical suburb. If you want to drive to the city, instead of taking a bus, you have to sit in traffic, pay for gas, and pay for parking. Tbh, i hate driving. An average suburbanite that drives into a city for work can spend a couple hours a day in their car. To me, no house is big enough to waste so much time of your day and your life. It's more expensive that public transit (gas and parking) and you have to sit in rush hour traffic, getting angry,honking and yelling, cursing at people and having angry people honking, yelling, and cursing at you. ugh

Yeah, big cities have a lot of traffic, but I think city's traffic is more of a negative for suburbanites than city people, and I'll tell ya why: a lot of suburbanites say they like the "peace and quiet" and be able to drive into the city. a lot of city people don't drive. If you live in the city your already there! If you want to get to a different part of the city, you can walk, or take public transportation.
You can have a car and live in the city, and a lot of people do, but I don't like to.

I also think lawns are overrated. grass is just grass. it's nothing special.

City living has its negatives too. I know that. Like:

not as safe- there are safe areas of every city, and I hate when people from the suburbs act like crime is high everywhere in the city (I'm not saying all people from suburbs think this way, but I've heard a lot of stuff like that when I lived in the suburbs) I think it's better to grow up in a safe area of a city, rather than perfect suburbia where nothing ever goes wrong, because most people that grow up in the city are USUALLY more aware, and more street savy.

homeless beggers
schools (not all inner city schools are bad, but a typical suburban school is usually better than a typical inner city school)
and some people don't like noise and activity always going on
some people don't like crowded areas
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I can see why people could like suburbs though, because some people like perfectly safe, quiet, big homes, a lot of space, not too crowded, and driving.

Everyone is different though. to suburbanites:

it's perfectly safe, so they don't have to worry about anything
the quiet is nice and peaceful
the big homes are nice because they have room for a lot of stuff and people and space
they can enjoy a peaceful walk with not a lot of people around
and they enjoy driving

BUT to me:
Peace and quiet = boring and nothing going on + nothing to do
I don't need a big home, because I would rather live in a small apartment with a lot to do around me, because I'd rather not spend time at home; I'd rather be out
crowds = a lot going on, a lot more to do, etc. plus I like people
driving is aggrevating. I'd rather just pay 2 bucks for a quick bus or subway (actually I don't pay 2 bucks, I buy tokens)

I'll give you guys safety though.

I could go on, but I went on long enough, so I'm gonna end this soon.

Suburb people: don't be mad or offended or anything, all this is my opinion. Everyone has different opinions. Let's agree to disagree
feel free to disagree with my post if you want.

My parents were born and raised in the city, and they chose to have me born in the city, and have me spent the first 10 or 11 or whatever years of my life in the city, but after moving to the suburbs, they like it better now, and told me I will change my mind when I get older, but I don't see that happening EVER
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Old 01-14-2011, 07:40 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's because all of the suburbs Ogre posted ARE extremely expensive and unaffordable (Shaker Heights might be an exception, I don't know). There was no mention of Denver suburbs. PD's response was reasonable considering the suburbs posted.
You're being argumentative tonight. PD's post was pretty generic, about all suburbs, IMO.

To wit:

Quote:
The places that are affordable and safe are usually further away from amenities, jobs, lack public transit options and tend to have either uglier type of old housing stock or newer HOA subdivision construction, where you cannot do anything with your yard/home without approvals, yards are tiny and neighbors are pretty close by and there is nothing within reasonable walking distance.
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