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Old 01-13-2011, 11:14 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,421,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canes2006Champs View Post
Is it me or is Conservative a bad word on this site?
I think it depends on who you ask.

As far as my comments go, one of my biggest city/region-related pet peeves is when people think that all of the Midwest is ultra-conservative. It wouldn't bother me so much if that were actually true. Although very liberal myself, I have lived somewhere that could be described as solidly socially conservative, and while I personally wasn't thrilled with that, it was certainly the accurate way to describe the town as a whole. And here in Minneapolis it IS socially liberal, yet I KNOW there are people out there who assume that it's some sort of conservative stronghold. Not because they have any evidence or reason to make that argument, but just because they're basing their opinions on unfounded stereotypes.

Just my two cents.
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Old 01-13-2011, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,056,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I'm still surprised at how few people recognize that Minneapolis is a VERY socially liberal city.
I think it is because they have never been here and know nothing about it so are going by stereotypes. I was looking at a poll thread a few weeks ago about what cities people have visited. MSP was the least visited major metro in the country. My experience in real life is that Minneapolis is very inaccurately stereotyped in general, people think it is all chuch ladies and boy scouts.

Last edited by Drewcifer; 01-14-2011 at 12:49 AM..
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Old 01-13-2011, 11:36 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,948,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canes2006Champs View Post
Is it me or is Conservative a bad word on this site?
I've seen the whole spectrum on this site, including some real freaks from both, or should I say all persuasions.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:55 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,973,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canes2006Champs View Post
Is it me or is Conservative a bad word on this site?
I don't know if "conservative" is, but I've found "Social conservative" is generally a bad word on online forums. Social conservatives I think are relatively rare in the tech industry, the arts, academia, and among unmarried people under 40. Those groups I think seem to be more common on Internet forums than in general society.

Also if you're socially conservative you may feel uncomfortable discussing those issues because you don't want to insult people. I've not meant to insult people but my belief homosexual desires, including my own which I definitely have, should not be acted on by Catholics does anger some. I do understand that the desires are much more intense at 18-25, but still I do agree with Church teaching even if I've not entirely lived up to it a 100%. (I've never been with a guy, or even came close, but I've had homoerotic "lust in my heart" on occasion) I also think homosexuality is different than heterosexuality and I don't think I favor using the same terms, like marriage, for it. Those things can really anger people no matter if you say "but I respect if you feel different and I want you to have all the Constitutional Rights."
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Old 01-14-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,573,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I don't know if "conservative" is, but I've found "Social conservative" is generally a bad word on online forums. Social conservatives I think are relatively rare in the tech industry, the arts, academia, and among unmarried people under 40. Those groups I think seem to be more common on Internet forums than in general society.

Also if you're socially conservative you may feel uncomfortable discussing those issues because you don't want to insult people. I've not meant to insult people but my belief homosexual desires, including my own which I definitely have, should not be acted on by Catholics does anger some. I do understand that the desires are much more intense at 18-25, but still I do agree with Church teaching even if I've not entirely lived up to it a 100%. (I've never been with a guy, or even came close, but I've had homoerotic "lust in my heart" on occasion) I also think homosexuality is different than heterosexuality and I don't think I favor using the same terms, like marriage, for it. Those things can really anger people no matter if you say "but I respect if you feel different and I want you to have all the Constitutional Rights."

Nothing wrong with debate, it goes farther back than Catholicism to Plato's Republic when he is discussing the kallipolis (beautiful city). In it he finds no use for homosexual intercourse, and very little use for heterosexual intercourse for that matter. Furthermore, (through Socrates and Glaucon) he discusses how sometimes it might be okay for a male mentor to make sexual advances on a young male pupil as part of the mentorship process.
There are ignorant folks on both sides of the debate for sure.
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,648 posts, read 7,451,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Southern, eastern, and black cities are most likely to be socially conservative (black culture tends to be evangelical-consensus, anti-gay and conservative in its fashion sense, even in the largest cities, these tendencies being inherited from the South). And anywhere in the Bible Belt or to a lesser extent the Mormon Belt.

Of course, some Southern/Bible Belt cities like Atlanta are actually something of a refuge from that culture, and Salt Lake City is likewise a bit of a refuge from Mormon culture, believe it or not. So that makes it more complicated.

I'll try this out though.

Most Conservative:
1. Philadelphia (east coast formal, half black, provincial)
2. D.C. (very formal, majority black, cosmopolitan)
3. Detroit (almost entirely black)
4. Atlanta (the center of the conservative South, but something of a refuge)
5. Dallas (mix of Southern types and cautious family-oriented suburban types)
6. Houston (like Dallas but more cosmopolitan)
7. Boston (open-minded but old-school)
8. Chicago (see Boston, but bigger and not as old)

Most Liberal:
1. Seattle (anything goes, but don't be annoying)
2. NYC (they will judge you, but it's not personal; nothing really shocks them anymore)
3. SF (very open-minded, but very status-conscious)
4. LA (open-minded, but image- and status-conscious)
5. Minneapolis (American Scandinavia, quiet peaceful tolerance)
6. Miami (could be open-minded, for all we know, but hard to see past the attitude)
7. Phoenix (it's in the New Age, individualist West, so it's more liberal than it gets credit for)
I agree about Phoenix. I think the media paints a pretty conservative picture of Phoenix, but with the media, everything seems to be extreme anyways. However, having lived in Chicago, Texas, Indiana, and having family living in the north and east, I find Phoenix to be more socially accepting than many of these other places. Let's not confuse fiscal conservatives with social conservatives. Phoenix is conservative, but in the fiscal sense.
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Old 01-14-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
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Sorry, I didn't notice in your original post you were asking to rank from a specific set of cities. With that said, here is my take on the matter, in order from most socially liberal to socially conservative:
  1. DC
  2. NYC
  3. Boston
  4. SF
  5. LA
  6. Philadelphia
  7. Miami
  8. Seattle
  9. Detroit
  10. Chicago
  11. Minneapolis
  12. Atlanta
  13. Houston
  14. Dallas
  15. Phoenix
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Old 01-14-2011, 04:49 PM
 
704 posts, read 1,503,549 times
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I'm considering metro areas here, so I'm taking the suburbs into account. My city ranking would probably be a little different. Some of these cities--like Atlanta and Houston--really are very liberal cities, but have such conservative suburbs that it tilts them to the right.

San Francisco
New York City
Seattle
Washington DC
Boston
Los Angeles
Detroit
Philadelphia
Chicago
Minneapolis
Miami
Houston
Atlanta
Phoenix
Dallas


A few other big ones that weren't on your list:

Liberal: Portland, Austin, Providence,
Conservative: Cincinnati, Oklahoma City, Kansas City, Denver, San Antonio, Charlotte
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Old 01-15-2011, 02:05 AM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,732,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Great post, you are on the right track. I mean all encompassing, all facets, not just political and not fiscal in terms of poverty programs or just D/R... if that was the case Detroit might be the most "liberal" city in the u.s. but that isn't the case I don't think, same way in the socially conservative direction. Or as you say I think somewhere like NYC might have more R's than Boston... but could be more socially liberal all encompassing than Boston. I don't know myself that is why I made the thread getting locals comments.


"Boston is not exactly trendy compared with, say, NYC, LA, or Miami. Lots of jeans and sweats (some say the climate leads people to dress more for the practical needs of protection from the elements than to look flashy), sports bars, neighborhood pubs, deep-seated pride in the ol' neigh-buh-hood where most members of the same family have lived for six generations, die-hahd allegiance to those Sahwx, etc., etc. This is countered to some degree by an urbane populace in some young professionals districts, but maybe not to the degree seen in notably trendy cities."

This screams to me Chicago as well esp the practical part. I have less experience with Boston but planning on doing another (more thorough) visit in May.
I haven't spent enough time in Chicago to be closely familiar with everyday life all over the city. From what I've heard, there probably are some significant similarities between Chicago and Boston in the area we're talking about. Chicagoans have a reputation for being passionate about the local pro sports teams. Ditto Boston. From what I've heard, in Chicago outside the central city area that visitors see, there is an emphasis on loyalty to one's local neighborhood or section of the city. A big city (maybe more like a giant city, or close to it, in Chicago's case) can feel surprisingly intimate in many outlying areas, because of a culture centered around neighborhood pubs, mom-'n'-pop stores, and deep loyalty to their areas by residents of local small sections of the city. It's as if you don't really have a single monolithic large city, but a close patchwork of distinct small cities and large towns that share the same city government. That's my picture of Chicago. This, along with maybe a certain practical approach to everyday life among the non-yuppie, non-hipster segments of the populace, sounds very similar to Boston's outlying sections. These features seem to me to be more socially conservative in the area of everyday life, notwithstanding more leftward leanings in socially oriented political issues.

Last edited by ogre; 01-15-2011 at 02:55 AM..
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Old 01-15-2011, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
1,168 posts, read 2,535,491 times
Reputation: 1354
Conservative to Liberal

1. Dallas
2. Atlanta
3. Houston
4. Detroit
5. Phoenix
6. Miami
7. DC
8. Chicago
9. Philadelphia
10. Minneapolis
11. Boston
12. Seattle
13. Los Angeles
14. New York
15. San Francisco
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