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Old 07-03-2011, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Armsanta Sorad
5,660 posts, read 6,856,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
True, but your grandparents or great-grandparents are probably from the South.
They are.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Ft.Lauderdale/Miramar FL
180 posts, read 351,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UTHORNS96 View Post
I'm surprised Miami's % of AA's is so high.
Why so surprised?
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Ft.Lauderdale/Miramar FL
180 posts, read 351,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderful Jellal View Post
2000 it's old, the african immigration to the US exploded you know (30,000 in 2000 / 124,000 in 2009), they'll have an impact..You can see the impact of the somali immigrants in Minneapolis for example.
In Miami they have AA, sure, but don't underestimate the haitian immigration, the US welcomed 200,000 of them for 2001-2009, and South Florida is their main destination, and they have more babies than AAs too.
The Haitian population down here does have more babies but, there are more AA's then Haitians.
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Old 07-03-2011, 11:56 AM
 
15 posts, read 14,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanti View Post
The graph with the percentages of blacks with bachelors degrees shows who really is the true black capitol of America. Washington D.C. not only has the richest per capita Black Americans but the most educated, passing San Jose which has less than 70,000 blacks in its metro area and is a niche technical market for blacks. Raleigh and Nashville are pleasant surprises both passing Atlanta in educational attainment this decade. Although Atlanta also gained in percentages of educated blacks it seems like they are receiving a lot more quantity over Quality. I know a lot of people with not even a high school degree who moved to Atlanta and Charlotte and I thought they were crazy but it seems to be the trend. On the other hand Raleigh's not that much of a surprise being that its one of D.C. cousin cities. Nashville is the real surprise gaining over five percentage points in bachelor's degree attainment amongst blacks surpassing D.C. in numerical gains.
"the richest per capita Black Americans " is because the cost of living in DC is higher. You do understand that, right?
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Old 07-04-2011, 02:57 AM
 
46 posts, read 65,547 times
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D.C. has the largest Black professional class percentage wise of any city in the country period, thats why Black households making over $200,000 annually in the D.C. area more than triples the Atlanta area and adding Baltimore it quadruples. Due to the cost of living in the D.C area present and future Black migrants to the D.C. area will more likely hold at the minimum a four year degree. D.C. in general is more of a white collar city than Atlanta and probably always will be because the economy is purely knowledge based. Atlanta has to be given credit for creating a large Black professional class in a city with a semi-logistics economy but in D.C. intellectual capital is what makes the city move. This is the same reason that the Raleigh Durham area has more Black professionals percentage wise than Atlanta because their economy is also based off of intellectual capital. D.C. may not be the Black cultural capital of America but throughout America's history it has been the Black intellectual hub. From Fredrick Douglass, the most famous Black intellectual during the 19th century to Carter G. Woodson, the father of Black history a large percentage of America's Black intellectuals have either migrated to, was raised in or spent a significant amount of time in D.C. Names like Thourgood Marshall and his mentor Charles Houston to Vernon Jordan and Eric Holder set the standards for Black lawyers are all Washingtonians one way or another. In the military world Benjamin O'Davis sr. and jr. to Colin Powell all are Washingtonians. In the medical field Charles Drew, the most famous Black doctor, to Matthew Henson the legendary Black explorer are all Washingtonians. There is a number of reasons that D.C. has such a large percentage of Black intellectuals but the main reasons in my judgement is large percentage of free Blacks before emancipation, the lure of educated Blacks to the city during reconstruction, the federal government which tries to be even handed in hiring practices and Howard university, the school which has probably produced more Black professionals than any other school in the nation.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:38 AM
 
56,642 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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^ To supplement the post above, look at the history of Dunbar High pre-1955. Thomas Sowell - "The Education of Minority Children"

Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)
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Old 07-04-2011, 11:49 AM
 
46 posts, read 65,547 times
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^I forgot to mention Dunbar High which in it's own right is iconic being the first Black high school in America. Their first list include the first Blacks to graduate from West Point and Annapolis, the first Black woman to hold a degree, the first Black federal judge,the first black professor of a major university and the first Black cabinet member. Most of my family on my mother's side were all educators starting from my great grandmother in Mississippi. During the great migration the family members who had a college education flocked to D.C., the family members who didn't have a college education migrated to Chicago, the Quad Cities, Ohio and Los Angeles. Even today I still have family members migrating from Mississippi up to D.C. to either work for the federal government or take teaching positions.
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Old 07-04-2011, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Armsanta Sorad
5,660 posts, read 6,856,070 times
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One reason I wouldn't move to the South is due to the stereotypes.
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Old 07-04-2011, 03:57 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,333,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by West of Encino View Post
One reason I wouldn't move to the South is due to the stereotypes.
Too bad you couldn't take the time out to experience it for yourself.

And based on some earlier discussions, I believe a lot of those stereotypes you're speaking of are actually from the 50's and 60's if I remember correctly. I'm not saying that things have turned a complete 180 since then all across the region, but stereotypes from that era are horribly outdated. Otherwise, why are Blacks from other regions of the country moving here in droves and staying?
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Old 09-20-2011, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,293,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanti View Post
D.C. has the largest Black professional class percentage wise of any city in the country period, thats why Black households making over $200,000 annually in the D.C. area more than triples the Atlanta area and adding Baltimore it quadruples. Due to the cost of living in the D.C area present and future Black migrants to the D.C. area will more likely hold at the minimum a four year degree. D.C. in general is more of a white collar city than Atlanta and probably always will be because the economy is purely knowledge based. Atlanta has to be given credit for creating a large Black professional class in a city with a semi-logistics economy but in D.C. intellectual capital is what makes the city move. This is the same reason that the Raleigh Durham area has more Black professionals percentage wise than Atlanta because their economy is also based off of intellectual capital. D.C. may not be the Black cultural capital of America but throughout America's history it has been the Black intellectual hub. From Fredrick Douglass, the most famous Black intellectual during the 19th century to Carter G. Woodson, the father of Black history a large percentage of America's Black intellectuals have either migrated to, was raised in or spent a significant amount of time in D.C. Names like Thourgood Marshall and his mentor Charles Houston to Vernon Jordan and Eric Holder set the standards for Black lawyers are all Washingtonians one way or another. In the military world Benjamin O'Davis sr. and jr. to Colin Powell all are Washingtonians. In the medical field Charles Drew, the most famous Black doctor, to Matthew Henson the legendary Black explorer are all Washingtonians. There is a number of reasons that D.C. has such a large percentage of Black intellectuals but the main reasons in my judgement is large percentage of free Blacks before emancipation, the lure of educated Blacks to the city during reconstruction, the federal government which tries to be even handed in hiring practices and Howard university, the school which has probably produced more Black professionals than any other school in the nation.
Thurgood Marshall is from Baltimore.Vernon Jordan was born and raised in Atlanta.Colin Powell is from New York and was Commander of Fort McPherson before becoming the head of the NSA.

As far as "intellectual capital".Thats no runway either.The largest consortium of Historical Black Colleges and Universities called The Atlanta University Center in which one of its institutions,the Atlanta International Theological has produced more African American pastors and theologians than any other institution in the world.Of course the other well known members in that consortium are Morehouse,Spelman and Clark Atlanta.

WEB Dubois: professor of history and economics at Atlanta University
Booker T Washington:The Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition Speech was an address on the topic of race relations given by Booker T. Washington on September 18, 1895.
Presented before a predominantly white audience at the Cotton States and International Exposition (the site of Piedmont Park) in Atlanta, Georgia, the speech[1] has been recognized as one of the most important and influential speeches in American history.


Not to mention the Morehouse School of Medicine .A 2010 study ranked MSM as the number one medical school in the country in the terms of social mission. The social mission score used in the study evaluated schools on percentage of graduates who practice primary care, work in health professional shortage areas, and are underrepresented minorities.[2]
[edit]Presidents of Morehouse School of Medicine
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