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Old 09-20-2011, 07:41 PM
 
605 posts, read 1,234,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northstar22 View Post
I guess the reason it bothers me is that it's self-segregationist - blacks all moving to one place instead of integrating into the larger society, like in Canada (yes, I know Canada has a much smaller black population). Also, I know blacks aren't the only people to self-segregate -- every group has done it at some point, it's the American way, sadly.

As far as the South being backwards, well, it is in many ways. It's come a long way since the 1950s, but it still has the nation's highest poverty rate, highest teen pregnancy rate, lowest education rate, highest crime rate and largest number of hate groups. Plus, the far-right politics of the region aren't really my thing (not to turn this into a political thread).

Obviously, not all of the South is like what I described above, and blacks tend to move to the more progressive regions like Atlanta and Houston (I don't consider Florida part of the South). Obviously, as I'm not culturally black and have deep roots in the Midwest, I can't fully understand what draws blacks to the region over, say, Seattle, Colorado or New York. There's nothing wrong with blacks (or anyone, for that matter) moving south, I just wish the Midwest was more of a destination.
The only thing that worries me is that African Americans may become increasingly marginalized as other immigrant populations come into the United States. The number of blacks in elite schools is ridiclously low compared to Asians and whites.

If the economic/social situation for blacks does not change, overtime blacks will remain a large underclass while Asians/whites/and a small percentage of successful Hispanics control the top tiers of American society.

If you look at the stats Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority. And Asians and Hispanics are intermarrying more with whites and distancing themselves from blacks more and more as the gap between classes expand. Even though the white proportion of the population is decreasing the definition of whiteness will eventually expand. While the dichotomy between non black and black remains. The number of blacks is fairly low (holding at 12 or 13 percent) compared to the expanding populations of immigrants from Asia and Mexico. Furthermore the political power of blacks is decreasing compared to other ethnic minorities.
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Old 09-21-2011, 08:45 AM
 
56,531 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skihikeclimb View Post
The only thing that worries me is that African Americans may become increasingly marginalized as other immigrant populations come into the United States. The number of blacks in elite schools is ridiclously low compared to Asians and whites.

If the economic/social situation for blacks does not change, overtime blacks will remain a large underclass while Asians/whites/and a small percentage of successful Hispanics control the top tiers of American society.

If you look at the stats Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority. And Asians and Hispanics are intermarrying more with whites and distancing themselves from blacks more and more as the gap between classes expand. Even though the white proportion of the population is decreasing the definition of whiteness will eventually expand. While the dichotomy between non black and black remains. The number of blacks is fairly low (holding at 12 or 13 percent) compared to the expanding populations of immigrants from Asia and Mexico. Furthermore the political power of blacks is decreasing compared to other ethnic minorities.
Keep in mind that Asians are still only about 5% of the US population and not all Asians are the same. For instance, SE Asians have poverty rates on par with Blacks and are dealing with many of the same issues in their urban neighborhoods.

Also, African immigrants are the most educated in the US. So, it's not like there isn't black immigration and many of those immigrants come educated.

Also, education rates have increased for Blacks, in spite of a gap between racial groups. So, it's not like Blacks are getting an education and while many of the top tier schools might not have a relatively high percentage of African Americans, some do and many go to colleges that are still good, along with the Historically Black Colleges.

Then, you have to keep in mind that even among Blacks, interracial marriages have increased as well, but not as high as it is for other minority groups and the bulk are still marry intraracially. Actually, the trend for other minority groups is reversing, as more immigrants from those groups enter the US and see more potential partners within their own racial/ethnic group.

If anything, I wouldn't say that the definition of Whiteness will change based on it's history and if anything, the way we look at race might change as a whole. With that said, the socialization of race, which is the biggest factor, would need to change. I'm not necessarily holding my breath though.

I don't know if the political power is decreasing, as more Black folks move South, it in turn can create a bloc in politics. That will become more complex as Blacks continue to be more mobile and could shift political ideology or even form more political ideologies based on what is going on. Even in urban areas outside of the South, with some cities actually still increasing in Black percentage, this could be the case as more Black people get into positions of authority/power.
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Old 05-01-2012, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,993,100 times
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Saw this interesting graph in an article about Dallas.

“YEARLY AVERAGE” OF NEW AFRICAN-AMERICAN RESIDENTS 2006-2010
Prepared by the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., From: D Magazine : Why Young Black Professionals Are Wary of Dallas

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Old 05-01-2012, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Denver
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Surprised to see Baton Rouge so high, much larger metros draw less blacks?
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Crown Town
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Surprised to see Baton Rouge so high, much larger metros draw less blacks?
I'm sure that's attributed to Katrina. Also in that article I linked, it says the larger metros that are missing from the list, places like NY and Chicago have been losing black population, so that's why they're not on the list.
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Old 05-01-2012, 01:46 PM
 
56,531 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
I'm sure that's attributed to Katrina. Also in that article I linked, it says the larger metros that are missing from the list, places like NY and Chicago have been losing black population, so that's why they're not on the list.
Good point about Katrina. Places like Salt Lake City and Provo-Orem in Utah were areas where people were sent to after Katrina.

Another factor could be the major areas are feeding smaller areas in the same region. So, a lot of former NYC area residents may go to areas like Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown, Syracuse, Rochester, Scranton-Wilkes Barre and Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton.
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Old 05-01-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,042,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
I'm sure that's attributed to Katrina. Also in that article I linked, it says the larger metros that are missing from the list, places like NY and Chicago have been losing black population, so that's why they're not on the list.
Unless I keep missing it, the obvious omission is DC and they aren't losing Blacks like that.
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Old 05-01-2012, 02:36 PM
 
29,888 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Unless I keep missing it, the obvious omission is DC and they aren't losing Blacks like that.
I thought the same thing. That's a big omission and I'm pretty sure they'd be a bit high on this list.
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Old 05-01-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,993,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Unless I keep missing it, the obvious omission is DC and they aren't losing Blacks like that.
If that's "net migration", it wouldn't suprise me if DC is not in the top 50.
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,042,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
If that's "net migration", it wouldn't suprise me if DC is not in the top 50.
Why? DC's black population overall was the 4th fastest in the nation in the last decade behind Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston, I believe, and many of those came from the Midwest and Northeast. I do know many DC area Blacks moved to North Carolina and Southern VA. But many moved back as well. Surely it received more than Rochester, New York.
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