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Old 01-14-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 13,162,570 times
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Climate-wise I might think the Pacific Northwest. Tillamook County, Oregon looks to have a decent percent of Episcopalians while also being largely secular.

http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo.../episcopal.gif
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo.../adherents.gif
http://www.city-data.com/county/Till...County-OR.html

Culturally I might guess coastal Maine as they have some of the most English-descended, non-Mormon, towns in the US. York, Maine looks to be around 25.5% English descended and is named for a place in England. The smaller town of Milbridge, Maine is listed as over 40% English-descended.

http://www.city-data.com/city/York-Maine.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Milbridge-Maine.html

Also maybe some parts of Virginia, if you're open to more traditional old-fashioned England.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greene45 View Post
Is there a region in the U.S. that has....
a) the same general climate as Britain
b) looks like england (green with deciduous or mixed forest and rolling hills)
c) towns/villages/cities/communities that feel like england in any way.

?????????

thank you,
James
I don't think you'll find all three of those qualities in one single U.S. region. For the first two, perhaps parts of the Pacific Northwest; for the third, maybe some of the older towns in New England.
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Old 01-14-2011, 11:20 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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If only you can stick Boston's metro area on the coast of Washington state.

Manchester, NH gets my vote anyway.
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Old 01-15-2011, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
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Never been to London but I've heard some people compare Boston to Dublin, which I know is not the same as London but would probably give you more of that European feel I think.
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Old 01-15-2011, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Oxford, Ohio
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You're right, the Willamette Valley does share a similar landscape. I must have overlooked that. I just think as a whole, the western sections of Oregon and Washington are going to be more mountainous instead of rolling hills. Echoing the same sort of sentiments that BPerone201 expressed, I think if you could plop Boston and some New England villages down in the Willamette Valley, you'd have as close to England as you could find in the U.S.
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Old 01-15-2011, 08:10 AM
 
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If you're looking for a city vibe and overall feel your best bet would be Boston. If you're looking at rural geography and weather specifically, as pointed out the Pacific Northwest would best meet your criteria.
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Old 01-15-2011, 12:47 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Boston is the most English in feel of the major American cities, in its culture, architecture, and general layout. Neighborhoods like Beacon Hill, Back Bay, the South End, Charlestown, and Cambridge certainly evoke parts of London.

New England is culturally the closest to Britain that I have experienced among the U.S. regions, although as noted it differs in terms of its somewhat less rainy climate with greater temperature extremes, and a considerably more heavily forested landscape (less farmland).

The towns themselves were however designed with a certain English sensibility, built around village greens for example. The oldest towns in New England are most reminiscent of the Mother Country; some notable examples are Marblehead, MA, Newburyport, MA, Ipswich, MA, Salem, MA, Concord, MA, Sandwich, MA, Newport, RI, Wickford, RI, Mystic, CT, Portsmouth, NH, Kennebunkport, ME, Damariscotta, ME, and Camden, ME, among many others.

Vermont often reminds me of Britain with its New England style villages, green rolling hills, and pastureland, although it is still much more highly forested than most of the UK.

Certainly the Hudson Valley and other parts of Upstate New York are strong contenders for resembling the English landscape, as well as areas of Pennsylvania.

The Pacific Northwest most closely resembles Britain in terms of climate.
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Old 01-15-2011, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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My stepdad has lived in England and said it looks like the Willamette Valley.
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Old 01-15-2011, 03:37 PM
 
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Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia has a stately ambiance reminiscent of historical England, including the costumed craftsmen, architecture, and the many wares for sale in the gift shops, old Episcopal churches, and the names of communities in the area identical to English town and county names.

All 6 of the New England states, as well as the Tidewater Virginia region, have many town and place names identical to English counties and towns, and the speech accent traditionally is non-rhotic. Although relatively few New Englanders today have British ancestry (most come from other ethnic groups).

Last edited by slowlane2; 01-15-2011 at 03:48 PM..
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Old 01-15-2011, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 1,198,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by insightofitall View Post
You're right, the Willamette Valley does share a similar landscape. I must have overlooked that. I just think as a whole, the western sections of Oregon and Washington are going to be more mountainous instead of rolling hills. Echoing the same sort of sentiments that BPerone201 expressed, I think if you could plop Boston and some New England villages down in the Willamette Valley, you'd have as close to England as you could find in the U.S.
Parts of the Oregon Coast kinda resemble Scotland
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